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1935 chevrolet clocks


woodremover
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2 hours ago, woodremover said:

But have not seen the clock marked GM before , what was it used in ??

I can be corrected in this, but I believe GM marketed a handful of Chevrolet fleet passenger cars and taxis as unmarked GM's or GMC's and sold at GMC dealers.   Since GMC never offered a passenger car in their lineup, and some municipalities and other large users of GMC trucks and buses did a huge volume amount with a local dealer, GM apparently did sell a few Chevrolet sedans either without identification, or under a GMC label.

 

Craig

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In 1933, there were taxicabs called "General" (not GMC), though I believe they were built by GMC as Yellow Coach and Yellow Cab had apparently been rolled into GMC around that time. They were NOT Chevrolets. They look like Pontiacs, but they aren't that either. Two remain. One restored and one rusty shell. The owner of the restored one has posted here. Did they continue to make "General" cabs through the 1936 era?

 

This is the first I have heard of the unmarked (or GMC marked) Chevrolet cars. It would be a hoot to own one. Do any remain?

 

Back to the clock, if it is a Chevrolet part, and you post it on https://vccachat.org/ , it is almost a given someone will know.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Bloo said:

In 1933, there were taxicabs called "General" (not GMC), though I believe they were built by GMC as Yellow Coach and Yellow Cab had apparently been rolled into GMC around that time. They were NOT Chevrolets. They look like Pontiacs, but they aren't that either. Two remain. One restored and one rusty shell. The owner of the restored one has posted here. Did they continue to make "General" cabs through the 1936 era?

That is correct, the cabs marketed through GMC dealers were called "General" cab, and were not Chevrolets.  They were made until 1938.  The taxicabs were on a longer wheelbase than the standard Chevrolet passenger cars, but Chevrolet-badged taxicabs were available.  Here is a 1938:

 

38_Chev_Taxi.jpg

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This is from the same company that would become Westclox and brought us the famous BigBen and BabyBen alarm clocks. I've worked on the alarm clocks and they are pretty well made. This is probably an impulsed, electrically rewound mechanical movement from what I deduce from the photos and patent drawing. From my experience the month and date of manufacture is usually stamped into the movement plate (often on an inside face though).

 

Westclox.jpg

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Here is the movement in the clock . This is a spare clock for parts .There is a set of points on the lower right hand side with springs attached.When the points close the electric cylinder at the top winds the clock and opens the points.as the clock winds down ,it closes the points once again and the electric cylinder rewind the clock again .works as a normal clock would but instead of manually winding the clock the electric cylinder and points do it for you .. 20211225_102753.jpg.10ce72c4827fde52835636d35638d324.jpg

Edited by woodremover (see edit history)
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Thanks! As FYI the points don't need to be super clean like on a distributor....I mean just reasonably clean. What is important is the trip mechanism is clean at all pivot points. I've worked on a few clocks like this: a Poole and a university's master regulator clock. The key is to get it to trip as infrequently as possible. That means it's running with high efficiency.

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