CatBird

Pressurized oil system questions?

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Just recently acquired 1927 Speedster. It has a pressurized oil system and filter.

When I get a "new" car, I like to go fluids. When I check the oil level with the upper petcock (on the hogshead) a quantity of oil comes out. Usually this is an overabundance of oil, and I open the petcock and let it run until level, but the oil filter and system is higher than the petcock.

Does the oil pressure system use the same level of oil, ie, open the higher petcock?
 

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Posted (edited)

Hard to say because no one knows what the person did (or tried to do) when they installed the pressurized system. I would take the lower inspection cover off and see what is going on inside.

 

I am assuming the oil pump is scavenging oil from the bottom of the crankcase (the hogs head is above the crankcase) and then pushes it through the external oil lines, then it goes into the  area above the lower inspection cover and into the filter and as the filter fills up, it goes back into the crankcase. I wouldn't think there is any need to have oil above the upper petcock, but I wouldn't know for sure until I looked inside and saw what the engine builder had in mind. I don't see any reason for extra oil but I might be missing something. 

 

Most of the time when someone installs pressurized oiling on a Model T, they fit a later aftermarket, internal oil pump (VW is often used) to the rear of the engine block and it is driven by the end of the camshaft. Of course, this would be inside the engine so you would not be able to see it unless you took the whole transmission cover assembly (hogshead) off. Another way of doing it is to install an external oil pump using the generator mount or the timer area (in front of the camshaft). However, if you do it this way you will have to forego either the generator or modify the ignition system location (timer, distributor or ?). 

 

Hope this makes sense. 

Edited by motoringicons (see edit history)
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On custom oiling systems, I like to drop the pan, pull the valve covers, and run a pressure pot on the system to see how everything is functioning. Also, it's a good way to check for cracked lines...........we use the pot in the shop several times a year, and it holds about 15 gallons of oil, which we can regulate the pressure........works great to check the oil pressure dump also. 

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motoringicons, I allowed some few oil drip out and it did not have only about an ounce from the upper petcock, and it looked relatively clean. I think it is appropriate to the oil level.

 

The Ruckstell was slightly overfilled and the viscosity was about like thin honey. Also clean. The car was well maintained. Somebody really loved it.

It even has a tandem trailer (of course not needed with a Model T), and it is also very well done. Custom for the car. It has matching hubcaps, from a 1950s car. I can see the driver/owner taking it to meets/races. I wonder how it competed. I cannot find any images on Google. It would seem it was a "significant car" in it's day. 

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A remote oil can or "pot" that acts like an oil pump that you hook up to the cars oiling system. It basically applies oil pressure at any number of pounds you dial it in at to check for excessive oil bells by, leaks, and to see if all parts of an engine are being lubricated. Many expensive cars have pre oilers on them, which makes pressure in the engine BEFORE you even hit the starter. Common on airplanes as well. If you have pre war cars, it's a required item. 

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