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Saw this clean little 1964 Dodge Dart at the post office today....


keiser31
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50th Anniversary for Dodge / Dodge Brothers,

 

and while our '66 Dart was a red GT convertible with black bucket seat interior, 3-speed Torque-Flyte tranny, and special order (for the dealer's wife) 318 ci engine,

a 225 ci Slant-6 with either automatic or 3-on-the-tree could easily outlast the original purchaser's grandchildren, given modest maintenance.

 

Edited by Marty Roth
typo, and additional note (see edit history)
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Has anyone come up with a good answer as to why early Dodge Brothers vehicles bore the Star of David as an Emblem?

John and Horace Dodge were not Jewish.

 

I've heard it said that the Dodge Brothers Star of David may have been an "In-Your-Face" gesture toward Henry Ford. 

Their hatred for Henry Ford is well-documented,

as is Ford's extreme antisemitic  history.

 

 

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The story a lot of folks go with is that the "D" is a delta (or triangle) and the two brothers intertwined the two deltas and made the star creating Dodge Brothers, and had nothing whatsoever to do with the Jewish religion, positively or negatively. You may notice that the deltas are two colors instead of all one color.

DB emblem in tile.jpg

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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A brianj gave a pretty complete dissertation on this topic in AACA forum on Dec 21 2011, including some other posters (like keizer31) thoughts on pyramids (a universal symbol of power), delta (Greek D), the whole intertwining thing, as well as some observations on the possible freemasonry aspect (their symbol is similar, a 3 point draftsman's compass pointing up and a 3 point carpenter's square pointing down), with further thoughts on machinists fraternities etc. Most research indicates the correlation to the "Star of David" is at best coincidental. Many phrases or symbols of the past have been given modern meaning without provenance, this is likely one of them. 

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