Trey

Is it worth it to rebuild these parts?

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Should I try to have this rebuilt, or just throw it away?

20190309_100433.jpg

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I don't know what the issues are with this unit but an '88 has a one year only motor and pressure hose assembly, so I would at least save those parts.

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Do you know of a place I can send it to be rebuilt so I have a spare? It is for a 1988.

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That is the problem..........if there is someone rebuilding them,  I don't know who it is.    We had a couple places 10 years back, but the volume was so low they quit doing them.

You did not mention what is wrong with the unit pictured.........the most common problem is the accumulator (that black ball),  next is the pressure switch,  then a toss-up between the pump motor and the relay.

I agree......DO NOT throw it away,  there is probably only 1 thing wrong with it and the other parts could help another Reatta owner keep his car on the road.

Check the history/reference section and there is lots of information on testing and checking the unit.

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Posted (edited)

The master cylinder portion of the units rarely go bad but the most common parts to go bad in order are the accumulator, pressure switch and the pump/motor. 

This is an '88 unit and the pump/motors are quite hard to find so definitely save the pump/motor, accumulator and the pressure switch. 

( the difference between the '88 units and the '89-90 units is for '88 they used a hose going to the master cylinder and the later ones used a steel line. The pumps and master cylinder are taped different. )

As long as you are saving those pieces just save everything.

Very often if the brake fluid has not been changed about every five years the valve body on the side of the unit can also be bad so that is also nice to have as a spare.

Ronnie has on his sight instructions on how to test accumulators.

If battery and ground are applied to the two terminals on the motor and it runs it is probably good.

Remove the connector on the pressure switch and look inside. If you see even the tiniest drop of brake fluid next to any of the five pins, the switch is no good. With no seepage the switch can still be bad but most likely good.

I always have all of these parts available but if you have a Reatta you can save some money in the future.

 

Edited by Jim (see edit history)

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I may not be the best steward of this part. Would anybody like to buy it from me? I actually have two.

 

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Maybe Jim or Marck at East Coast Reatta might be interested. I have 5-6 of them myself...

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Posted (edited)

I'm new here. Hi. I know who can rebuild these Teves units. Power Brake XChange in Pittsburgh. They did my accumulator for 250. They do the whole systems as well.

Edited by Voiceboy
Typo (see edit history)

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