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Xander Wildeisen

What are your thoughts on this car?

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Oh, what the heck. Might as well stick my neck out and see if I can lower my approval rating.

 

Artistic endeavors are often fraught with perils of misunderstanding.

Still, I can't think of a better way to waste tens of thousands of dollars than to take a bunch of extremely rare and valuable historic auto pieces and butcher them until nobody likes the result.

If I were ten years younger, and wealthy, I would have loved to take the truly rare Hupp and work to restore it to the work of art it was.

But that is me.

 

The fact is, any hotrodder with a bit of artistic tendency, could take any of a thousand common empty shells of '30s/'40s/'50s cars, and make something as extreme or cartoonish as that thing.

, Without destroying a piece of history.

 

Foot, firmly in mouth, and facetiously, me.

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I wondered earlier if the front fenders might not look so massive if there were wheels/tires under them to provide some perspective. Then the picture of the red modified Cord in post 23 came along and I can see that any tires would be dwarfed under the visual weight of those fenders. I think that the true beauty of the Cord lies in the gorgeous clean lines of the coffin-nose front end. These fenders distract greatly from that.  In some ways the Cord might look best with the least in the way of fenders -- simple cycle fenders, perhaps.

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Cords are amazing design creations , sacrilege to alter , bit like tacking bits on to a Henry Moore sculpture, sad 

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The bold and bulbous grille on this car makes the large bulbous fenders acceptable. 

 

Screen Shot 2017-10-19 at 3.28.35 PM copy.jpg

 

I love Woodlights normally, but in the company of these large elements, I'm uncertain.

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That car pictured above is also very large. So the size of the fenders needed to fit the turning tire, are in scale/proportion to the rest of the car. The head lights look good, but need to be a touch bigger to be in scale, IMO.

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15 hours ago, zipdang said:

Plate glass grille? That's a new one on me.

 

This car shows a lot of forward thinking.

However that straight axel with the transvers spring is old tech.

I wonder if he is describing the GMC V6s that are bolted together.

Also wonder where the exhaust exits. Looks like right at the rear tire.

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One piece block and one piece crank.

So not bolted together, just looks that way.

Obviously not the original exhaust manifolds.

 

I remember back in the day when a cab over truck with one of those V6s came in with a knock.

It seems that the in house mechanic did a tune up on it and when he started it up it had a knock.

He had all of the take off parts laying on the floor of the truck and I noticed that one of the spark plugs had the electrode missing.

Guess where I found it.

The spark plugs drop in from the top and not that easy to get to.

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No, those are the original exhaust manifolds. If I recall right everything about these engines were from the V6s except the block and crank. I don't recall details about the oil system.

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I meant the headers on the car in question.

The manifolds on the stock engine look to just be duplicates of the V6 as I would have expected.

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Sorry, Jack. I misunderstood. I don't know how many of you are familiar with these GMC V6s, but they were able to produce remarkable amounts of torque. They were really coveted by guys who hauled loads and, especially, those who drove in the mountainous parts of our land. They could be ordered in a standard GMC pickup. As far as the V12 version goes, I remember that they also found some use in industrial applications. I read about one that was used to drive irrigation pumps.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GMC_V6_engine

 

 

Edited by Hudsy Wudsy (see edit history)

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Makes a ton of torque and barely off idle according to the interview.

I don't remember ever seeing one of the twelves but remember a ton of the sixes.

Of coarse these were new when I was coming up. Don't see them much anymore.

I do remember that the V6 got terrible mileage. But could tow a load.

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If I were one of those who enjoys collecting and restoring engines, I think I might have one displayed in my collection. There were interesting and unusual engines, especially being made by one of the big three.

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I dug around in Hudsys link and there is a clip of it running.

Albeit is kind of far away.

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On ‎10‎/‎23‎/‎2017 at 11:32 PM, Xander Wildeisen said:

I think there is one right around the corner from me. Sitting in a parking lot, in front of a auto salvage company.

 

Is that the V-12?  If so, a photo would be appreciated (at least by me).

 

Cheers,

Grog

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One of the last gasoline big truck engines to be introduced, if not the last. Diesels were already taking a big share of the heavy truck market. The big GMC V12 was a powerful motor but got 2 -3 MPG which is why it never caught on and was phased out after a few years.

 

They made a V6 version too. The V12 had its own block and crankshaft but shared heads with the V6. The V6 was similar in displacement to a typical V8 but was heavier, torquier, made less HP and burned more gas. But they would haul a heavy load with no trouble.

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