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63 Riviera rust


Guest gpsscottbc
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Guest gpsscottbc

Greetings to all on forum. I recently acquired a 63 riviera to make into a ratrod/daily driver. However, after removing the interior I found the rust to be quite extensive. Especially around the door support pillars, floor braces/panspost-101578-143142593536_thumb.jpg and area behind the rear wheel wells where the body attaches to frame, we're talking holes you can drop a golf ball through. Is it possible to fix the body without removing it or is the old girl too far gone? Its a car with manual windows, no air conditioning or other options, bare bones for a car of that status. The engine is out of car and would love to drive it but if I need to get another one i will. Any help is greatly appreciated.

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Welcome. A lot of what you've pictured is typical, but most of the time it's one place of the other. Unlike yours which seems to be everywhere. Search the archives for similar posts to see what others have done. I would say that if you have to pay to have it done, you'd be better off looking for something else. If your skills are good and you have the time and equipment, go for it. New floors, and trunk pans are available in the aftermarket. You'll have to make your own braces, rockers, body mounts, etc. The third picture is mostly sky, not metal, so I'm having a hard time even recognizing it. :eek:

Ed

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Guest clamshells

Mad skills and allot more time than money. If you're trying to make a name for yourself in the metal work/restoration business this a ideal before for you. Anything can be done with a sheet of metal if you have the tools and the time (there is that pesky T word again).

If you have good running gear, interior, trim, glass etc another shell might be a consideration. But no one says it cannot be done. Good luck and stick around.

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Greetings to all on forum. I recently acquired a 63 riviera to make into a ratrod/daily driver. However, after removing the interior I found the rust to be quite extensive. Especially around the door support pillars, floor braces/pans[ATTACH=CONFIG]256330[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]256331[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]256332[/ATTACH] and area behind the rear wheel wells where the body attaches to frame, we're talking holes you can drop a golf ball through. Is it possible to fix the body without removing it or is the old girl too far gone? Its a car with manual windows, no air conditioning or other options, bare bones for a car of that status. The engine is out of car and would love to drive it but if I need to get another one i will. Any help is greatly appreciated.

"She Gone"...this cant be a Colorado car, right? You should be able to find a MUCH nicer start right in your own backyard. Good luck,

Tom Mooney

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I was all about saving it until the last picture. The floorpans aren't that big of a deal. They sell them for 52.79 a piece and there are 8 total. Looks like you need maybe 6 of the 8, maybe less. Once you start talking about replacing structural metal i'm out unless it is patch jobs. The floorpan patch panels will go from the rocker panel to about an inch up on the transmission hump. Anything after that you have to make yourself.

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Guest gpsscottbc

Thanks for input that's the clincher the engine was making alot of noise and the old Dynaflow was making alot of noise and the old Dynaflow was acting like it was in neutral when you would come to a stop. I'm thinking a new purchase is in order and selling this as a parts car.

Edited by gpsscottbc (see edit history)
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Guest gpsscottbc

No Im thinking it was purchased for a northern clime, with salty roads. Michigan, Wisconsin comes to mind. I'm not much of a welder but could maybe hack it together for something but would prefer something to take to Viva las Vegas next year....

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Yep Ed. Mine was sitting for 28 years and had a leak. Drove it for 50 miles and seemed to stop. Still original fluid in it. Need suggestion for what best fluid to add or change. Thinking of just topping off. Shying away from modern synthetics. Read stories about problems after adding them to early trannys. Best fluid for the original, non rebuilt Dynoflows?? Anyone?

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The problem is that the seals may be 50 years old. What type of fluid may not matter if it won't hold any in the case. I guess you could always run around with a case a fluid and figure it in to your gas consumption for joy rides, but i would get tired of adding two quarts every time i filled it up:o

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There is a good chance the original oil is in the car and still a whale oil base. It was the best transmission fluid you could get. Like refrigerants, the newer blends and synthetics are all based on second choice materials. Save the whale oil if you can.

Bernie

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You can't be serious. Are you really telling a guy that his 50 year old transmission fluid is going to be good to go and a better alternative than anything else at present? That is taking it way too far guys. Keep your original air cleaner cover and battery tray, but if you think 50 year old transmission seals and fluid are good to go, i'm going to have to call you nuts.

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Guest dwhiteside64
Whales can live to be 200 years old. 50 year old whale oil is probably like 20 year old testosterone - POTENT.

Wow if only this was true for us crusty old fellers! :rolleyes:

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