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Looking good! I wish I had done mine in red at the time of paint, but mine were originally black and not knowing any better at the time... :P Now get them mounted!

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  • 3 months later...

Yesterday I sent the Super to the garage I use when I don't want to do the work.  Had the temporary core plug replaced, along with the rear main seal, oil filter and the oil pan gasket. Today the bottom of the engine is dry for the first time since I can remember. I may have bought that rear main seal kit almost 15 years ago, and it is one of three I bought when I wanted to do the job and could not find the others.  I'll probably choke when I see the bill tomorrow,  but I am pretty happy about it all today.

 

Yes, I know I should have done it myself.  But I spent the money anyway.  The nice thing is this garage guarantees their work and I know for a fact that they honor that warranty if needed.

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1st hiccup.  Oh, it is still dry underneath, but I haven't really run it either.  Hope to get it out Saturday.  Instead I went to talk to the mechanic who did the work and discovered we got oour signals crossed on the core plug replacement.  The one I wanted changed was the rear one on the passengers side.  But he found the front one on the drivers side was leaking, so he did that one instead.  So it will be back to the shop soon to get that temporary one replaced.

 

Now I need a gasket for the oil filter housing to block joint.  That's the one I hear is stamped steel and no longer available.  Anyone have any ideas on a suitable replacement?

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Cars has the composite gasket. Fusick has none.  I ordered up a pair.  But today I got some driving in and noted no leaks under the car.  So I cleaned up the mess of drip pans to really test it.  Meanwhile,  if I must say so myself,  this car is just a total pleasure to drive!  I even waxed it today in prep for our Regional.  Ya hoo!

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Ah, so, not everything is bright in Buick world.  Looks like the oil leak is higher up.  Much higher up.  like in the top part of the head gasket on the drivers side.  Oye! 

It's a relatively small leak, so I'm not too worried.  I've been driving it like this for quite some time so I can wait to address it.  But I am going to try a new valve cover gasket, and straightening the flange on that cover just to see if by chance that is the core problem. 

 

Also, since I never re torqued the head bolts after the valve job in 1988, I am thinking of re torqueing that one head.  Just don't know if it's adviseable to do it with the engine cold, or better if the engine is warm or better still if the engine is operating temperature?  I still need to review the shop manual but are there any opinions on this question?

 

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If not the valve covers, it might be at the cylinder head.  Two sources that I had to deal with and both involved the 0.015" steel head gaskets which I still use.  One, the oil feed to the rockers comes from the front of the engine and since the heads are interchangeable that oil feed tries to go down the back of the engine, but is supposed to be blocked  New head gasket with sealer will fix.  Two, there is not much clamping force on the top of the head gasket where the pushrods go through  the block, head and gasket and oil can get through and between gasket and block or gasket and head.  New head gasket and sealer will fix.  I had a little success by removing the intake and valley cover and smearing  sealer in that area.  Or live with it until the heads need to be removed.

While you have the valley cover off this is a good time to clean it.  (There is an excellent article in the Buick Club publication on how to do it; the procedure on my website and Mudbone's video is clearly inferior!)

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Thanks Willie. I have been thinking about this a lot today and I was pondering that with the law of gravity, it is near impossible for the oil to leak at this junction of the head and block.  The oil has pooled in the small gap between the head and block at the first two cylinders on the drivers side.

59b70094c63da_Enginecloseup2.thumb.JPG.78b72db2954bdad01d64d132a8d935fb.JPG

 

59b70095bfbda_Enginecloseup3.thumb.JPG.15a7c0597a8682a82c6e5153e8a2053a.JPG

 

Being there is a slight tilt of the engine front to rear, it only makes sense that this has to be at least one leak, as the oil should not flow uphill to this spot. 

 

What I now wonder is if there is a possibility that what I really have is a valley cover oil leak at this area? Perhaps  with splatter inside the motor oil gets to the bottom of the valley cover and then drips out of a bad gasket seal at this area?  It is hard to take this engine apart since it has been running so well.  But I was thinking maybe I should go as far as the valley cover, and that will give me a chance to clean the valley cover like you said, and see if it still has a leak after a new gasket with some sealer.

 

I was also thinking that maybe all these small gaps could be cleaned with brake cleaner, dried, and then sealed with black RTV before re fitting the intake manifold?  I can't think of anything detrimental to doing something like that. 

 

 

Edited by JohnD1956 (see edit history)
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  • 5 months later...
45 minutes ago, JohnD1956 said:

Ya-hoo. New tires on order. Gonna be a long two weeks waiting for em.  But it snowing again right now anyhow. 

Two weeks is long enough for you to put the car on stands; dismount the tires to check the wheels for straightness; have them blasted and either powder coated or painted.  I like red.:lol:

On these narrow rims have the assembly static balanced with all of the ugly weights on the inside.

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4 hours ago, old-tank said:

Two weeks is long enough for you to put the car on stands; dismount the tires to check the wheels for straightness; have them blasted and either powder coated or painted.  I like red.:lol:

On these narrow rims have the assembly static balanced with all of the ugly weights on the inside.

 

True  Willie, but then I wasted money on those new rims I got last year.  The ones with the new 15" safety rim welded onto the early factory buick rim centers, which are already checked for true, primed, painted red,  and just sucking up space in my shed.

0504171031[1].jpg

painted new rims.jpg

Edited by JohnD1956 (see edit history)
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13 hours ago, JohnD1956 said:

True  Willie, but then I wasted money on those new rims I got last year.  The ones with the new 15" safety rim welded onto the early factory buick rim centers, which are already checked for true, primed, painted red,  and just sucking up space in my shed.

Either I missed that or forgot because you are so slow at moving projects along. ;)

What tires did you decide on?

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24 minutes ago, old-tank said:

Either I missed that or forgot because you are so slow at moving projects along. ;)

What tires did you decide on?

 

Yes, I am guilty of being a slow poke.  I move at the speed of my discretionary income. :unsure:  I went for the Diamondback II's.

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I hear the Diamondback IIs are the best white walls you can buy. DOT certified with an actual date code and everything, and the way they impregnate the white wall is superior - or so I've heard. Definitely take pictures when they come in!

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

Had the alignment done by a 76 year old guy who is still active through his local body shop business.  He pronounced the front end in great shape although there is a little play in the idler arm, and I had the pass side front wheel bearing extremely loose, and he had to adjust the lash in the steering box.   It definitely seems better now but I will know more after taking it this weekend to Rhinebeck, NY. 

 

Frank said I must not have had the right side wheel bearing seated properly, as he took up the nut three full turns.  I also realized I failed to follow the proper procedure in the manual for adjusting these.  There are 4 steps in the manual:

1) tighten the bearing till all looseness is gone

2) rotate the wheel/drum to seat the bearing

3) loosen the nut till the bearing is just loose

4) retighten till there is no play in the bearing and then put the cotter pin into the nearest hole in the spindle. Note, the preload should be no more than I/12th turn of the nut.

This last part is where I messed up.  Instead of tightening to the next hole, I loosened the nut to what was the nearest hole.  Oh well, live and learn.

 

I just hope I have not wrecked that passengers side wheel bearing running it close to 500 miles that loose.  

 

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 On step four I was told to hand tighten the nut then go tight to the next hole for tightness on the bearing. How accurate this is I don't know but it's worked out for me with zero issue. 

 

Lucky you found someone local that wants to touch it! I get stuck with pie pans a grocery bags, a bubble level and and degree indicator. :P

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The last time this came up, some people here thought these ball bearings should have a tiny bit of slop (like Timkens), and others thought a slight preload.

 

Here is New Departure's information from 1952, and it sounded to me like it would leave the bearings preloaded:

 

http://chevy.oldcarmanualproject.com/manuals/1952sbb/52bb12.htm

 

I repacked the wheel bearings on my Pontiac yesterday. I had to replace one outer bearing. I used the method linked above, with a beam-type torque wrench. The procedure did result in slight preload on both sides.

 

Cranking the nut down to 200 inch pounds (I did that while spinning the wheel, even though New Departure didn't mention that) just seats the bearing in case it isn't. Then, you back it off.

 

The 50 inch pound final setting is the interesting part. Pulling on the beam torque wrench with one finger, that was an obvious place. At exactly 50 inch pounds, the torque starts to rise suddenly. There was no doubt at all where the "magic spot" was. It was much less obvious on the side that had a new bearing of slightly different design, but it was still there. On one side, the pin slipped in. On the other side, after loosening to the nearest cotter pin hole, there was still the slightest bit of preload.

 

I think Beemon's method would have exactly the same result.

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)
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18 hours ago, JohnD1956 said:

he took up the nut three full turns

Yikes!  It must have been cocked in a bind when you assembled.  The two times I ran into that was when we discovered that the one race for the inner bearing was wrong; another was one of those plastic cage replacement bearings (outer) that did not match the race (balls too big).

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3 hours ago, old-tank said:

Yikes!  It must have been cocked in a bind when you assembled.  The two times I ran into that was when we discovered that the one race for the inner bearing was wrong; another was one of those plastic cage replacement bearings (outer) that did not match the race (balls too big).

 

Geeze!  How did you determine the inner race was wrong? 

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I did say that,

I put it all they way to the spark plugs, under the covers.  I did remove the insulators at the rear of the covers and in the top guide brackets, so I so I could put the insulation in one piece the entire length.  I even put a length of it on my gas line from the fuel pump as far back as I could get it beyond the drivers exhaust manifold.  I think it made a big difference in both locations.

 

 

IMG_3470.JPG

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Thank you for sharing, I may do something similar here pretty soon! I was under the hood of my mom's 2004 Chevrolet S10 with the V6 Vortec motor and they have it exactly the same as you do from the coil pack.

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  • 1 month later...
  • 1 month later...

So, after thinking about the posts on the 1954 century sedan GA to NC thread, by wndsofchng06,  yesterday, I was motivated to get the Super out to check out my own heat riser valve situation.  Looks like my run of trouble free driving may be coming to a close.  Today was the first time since I bought the commercial battery,  in November 2009, that it did not have enough reserve to start the engine.   If it had caught at first,  I would have been okay, but by the third attempt it was obviously running down. So, I threw the charger on it. I guess 8.5 years on that battery is a pretty good run.  Just wish I had used the car more in those 8.5 years!

 

Anyway, last night I took it for a ride with the intent to document the engine temp after a run. It was a very low humidity day around here and I headed for the next town to the north of me.  The trip was only 6 miles, but there is a decent stretch of straight-away  road with 55 MPH speed limits.  The temp gauge was right on the N for the short trip.  And when I got to the next town I pulled off into a convenience mart to turn around.

 

By the time I idled through the parking lot, it had climbed to what I think is the 195* temp zone, which is about a third of the way between the N and H on my factory gauge. It was probably close to entering the red zone but didn't go there. 

 

 Along the way back I stopped and checked,  and sure enough , if I still have a valve in there, it would have been in the closed position. I say "if I have a valve in there" because I vaguely recall at one time the valve may have been folded in half.  But I am not sure of that.  I would think if there was a complete valve in there I would have been experiencing some serious overheating. If I am right about the folded over valve then at this point I was probably running half restricted exhaust on the passengers side.  The good news is the valve spins freely. 

 

So I temporarily wired the valve in an open position and took it out for another ride,  but as soon as the sun went down the ambient temperature was dropping and who knows how much that affected the test run?   However, using the same route,  the gauge was distinctly below the N during the drive. And on the turn around, it rose to slightly over the N while idling for a minute in the convenience store parking lot.  Then back below the N as I traveled back .

 

On the way home I pushed it a bit harder in the straight-away and right at the end of that road section I pulled into another lot.  I set the timer for 2.5 minutes, and sat there, engine idling, trans in drive.  At 2.5 minutes the needle was here:

 

1325962647_2018720enginetemptest.thumb.jpg.5238fcd9df842e59753ac2a36f778b7e.jpg

 

And within 3 miles after leaving that parking lot the temp was back to just on the N.

 

Today I checked the adjustment on the thermostat for the heat riser valve.  Again, the good news is the pin I thought was missing is still there.  And the thermostat may been off,  as in too tight.  However what I do not have is the two stops that limit the travel of the valve.  And the thermostat spring is not strong enough to hold the valve in any location so the weights fall to their natural position which leads to that closed valve indication.

 

I re wired the unit open for now while researching and determining what to do next, and to take it out today for another test run.    I hate pulling the pipes off, but may do so just to see what I do have in there regarding the valve.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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