jeff_a

Peerless For Sale Department

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I thought it sold, but I looked at the auction site again which says it did not sell.

You have the only 1916 V-8 Peerless in the world....and that should be worth something!

By any chance have you seen the story up in the General Discussion Forum about someone trying to fit the water distribution pipes on his 1915 Standard Eight with the Herschell-Spillman engine? The thread is: "1915 Standard Eight Roadster" and Bob,"vwlfan", has had new pipes made and can't get them to seat properly. I thought maybe you had taken those pipes on and off a few times over the years even though they'd be originals.

----Jeff

Edited by jeff_a
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just some questions, i have a 1926 peerless roadster that is not in running condition but exterior is in good condition. it has a boat tail. does anyone have any idea what i could value it at?

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I did not see the discussion forum about sealing the water manifolds on the Hirschell-Spillman V-8. This engine should be identical to my 1916 Peerless V-8. I had to make new manifolds for mine out of brass, the originals were steel and rusted out. Mine are flanged that go into the block and are sealed with split nuts and packing. The split nuts screw into the block tightening the packing against the flange and swelling against the block.

Peerless changed this and the 1917 V-8 water manifold had a flange with two bolt holes that sealed with a red rubber gasket between the flange and block. RHL

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more clarity

just some questions, i have a 1926 peerless roadster that is not in running condition but exterior is in good condition. it has a boat tail. does anyone have any idea what i could value it at?

Dear Traci,

Thank you for taking the effort to join the AACA Forums and posting your first message on the Peerless Forum. That's fantastic to hear about your Peerless! Such a desirable body style. Do you have a Model Six-80 with a cast-iron-crankcase six {carburetor on left side of engine}, a Model Six-72 {aluminum Peerless six with carburetor on right}, or a Model Eight-69 {aluminum Peerless V-8}? The only 1926 Peerless Boat Tail Roadster I can think of is in Africa. Where do you live? I live in Idaho, USA and have a 1928 Peerless Mod. 6-80 Boat Tail Coupe.

The question of car values is a difficult one, as monetary values of antique cars are neither constant or rational. Based strictly on their rarity compared to fellow thoroughbreds Packard and Pierce-Arrow, I would be tempted to say running Peerlesses should be worth $50,000*** and running restored ones $100,000*** A condition #5- 1927 Peerless converted into a farm truck sold for $1,200 in CA a couple of years ago...and a 1910 Brewster-bodied Peerless Victoria Landau sold for $469,000 in Maine about the same time. These are the lowest and highest prices I've heard of for Peerless in recent years.

About 3 years ago I averaged the asking and selling prices for Peeresses for sale in various places and came up with an average price of $19,000 for 15 cars, once I removed all the brass cars. As you know, Brass-Era cars in nice shape tend to bring a lot of money(some of these had just sold for $96,000, $180,000, $330,000, etc.).

----Jeff

***That doesn't mean they are...just that if rarity alone determined price, those might be starting points for these cars. Remember, there are more Duesenbergs around than Peerlesses...4 times as many Pierce-Arrows...and 16 times as many Packards.

Edited by jeff_a
A lot more additions. (see edit history)

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Dear Traci,

Thank you for taking the effort to join the AACA Forums and posting your first message on the Peerless Forum. That's fantastic to hear about your Peerless! Such a desirable body style. Do you have a Mod. Six-80 with a cast-iron-crankcase six {carburetor on left side of engine}, a Mod. Six-72 {aluminum Peerless six with carburetor on right}, or an Eight-69 {aluminum Peerless V-8}? The only 1926 Peerless Boat Tail Roadster I can think of is in Africa. Where do you live? I live in Idaho, USA and have a 1928 Peerless Mod. 6-80 Boat Tail Coupe.

The question of car values is a difficult one, as monetary values of antique cars are neither constant or rational. If it were up to me, any running Peerless would be $50,000 and up and any restored one $100,000 and up because of their rarity compared to fellow thoroughbreds Packard and Pierce-Arrow. A condition #5- 1927 Peerless converted into a farm truck sold for $1,200 in CA a couple of years ago...and a 1910 Brewster-bodied Peerless Victoria sold for $469,000 in Maine about the same time.

----Jeff

im not sure about the engine ill have to check with my grampa. the car is located in oregon

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You did ask "what I could value it at", so I will try to answer it to the best of my knowledge. Value is easy: it's just what one person considers good and is kind of subjective. However, you were probably trying to get at the question: "Is it worth anything monetarily?" I haven't seen your '26 Peerless Boat Tail Roadster in person and am not an antique car appraiser. I did notice that you have a color photo visible by clicking on the highlighted "1" underneath your display name. The good news is that you have a rare breed of car and quite the desirable body style!

Old Cars Weekly has a book you can buy with pre-WWII car prices on it*. I don't have one of those. The Standard Catalog of American Cars, 1805-1942, Vol. I was reprinted about 2 years ago. The 1996 edition has estimates of prices based on the condition #1 through #5 system and I have the 8 pages from that book relating to Peerless. Based on that, a '26 6-80 Roadster was listed at 4200/5200/8400/15,700/29,000. $4200 would be their estimate for a rough condition "#5" car. $29,000 would be for a "#1" car, perfect condition, exactly as it came from the factory.

A '26 6-72 Roadster was listed as: 4700/6100/9900/19,000/33,000. No listing for a 1926 8-69, though Peerless did build them. They are listed for 1927 at: 5200/6800/11,300/23,000/36,000. Please remember that these estimates are imprecise and 17 years old.

*2013 Collector Car Price Guide see: oldcarsweekly.com, price: $21.99

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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There is a 1931 Peerless Master Eight Sedan for sale in Florida. Ad is currently on the Buy/Sell Forum, with photos. I think the automobile has been in the same family about half a century.

Here's someone's chance to have one of only 12 car collections in the world to have what I call the Triple Crown of Car Collecting: one each of "The Three Ps of Fine Cars"! Price is $33,000. Poster's display name is: rwoodland. Thread last updated: 11/7/12.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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Guest BJM
just some questions, i have a 1926 peerless roadster that is not in running condition but exterior is in good condition. it has a boat tail. does anyone have any idea what i could value it at?

Traci

I monitor prices on all cars but so few Peerless cars change hands it is difficult. I would go with Jeff's price guide estimates but also, you may not know what a #1 or a #6 car is. Typically a #1 car would be as it left the showroom or in this case, an "over-restored" restored car now.

You stated yours in not running, but as Jeff notes, it is one of the maybe 2-3 most desirable 20's body styles, being an open car, boattail car.

What are your intentions? Do you wish to sell it? If so, provide this forum with at least 10 photos and describe it's status - such as when was the last time driven? and we can probably get you within $2000-$4000 in "worth". I suspect if it needs full restoration, but is solid, then look for it to be valued at $6,000 to $13,000. If it only needs sorted engine-wise, that is maybe an engine tune up with some parts replaced, then the value may be $10,000 to $20,000.

The issue is that so few Peerless cars change hands that this creates a double edged sword, so to speak.

Knowledgeable people in the collector world know of Peerless but don't necessarily clammer to own them. The true brass era Peerless cars are highly sought, but the collective pool of monied collectors is very small.

By the 1920's Peerless cache among the elite was waining, as they built several somewhat pedestrian cars engine wise, while maintaining fine coachworks and chassis assembly. This at a time when the competition was heating up, so for sure, the issue with your car selling for top dollar has far more to do with the limited collectibility then with the actual car. I hope that makes sense, but in a nutshell there is not a huge market for the car, and you must be patient at a price-point to find that collector that will purchase it.

I have a very rare car, which was offered on ebay a couple of months back at merely $1000 and received no bids, but had 50+ folks "watch" it, indicating that it is a "buyers" market and people are very careful to pull the trigger. I am parting the car out to recoup some of my money and one very rare part garnered only a $1 bid!

When I discussed this with a prominant collector of the car, he stated that my parts have value but no one presently is restoring one of thsi car and so no one needs the part BUT if they did then they would have to pay whatever to get the part, then it has more value.

Such is the case with your Peerless, if you find the right buyer and can find just 2-3 buyers interested, then a higher price will result in it's sale. I have seen some auctions on TV where a few buyers were interested in the car and drove the price up, but then only 2 in the crowd went back and forth for the car, raising the price of course, but basically, at that time, indicating that only 2 people were interested in that car's purchase.

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Bryan,

I don't know if we'll hear from the poster who owns the 1926 Peerless again or not. I kind of hate to answer questions about how much a car is worth. The answer is, technically, go to the best auto appraiser you can find and pay them $300-600 plus expenses to look at the car in person. Problem is, how long is that accurate?

Some people say that things like auctions, Craigslist and e-Bay determine value. Personally, I think that's a bunch of "barnyard acids". Auctions determine what the guys who happen to be there have in their pockets, feel like paying, or don't feel like paying but circumstances lead them down the path of overpaying (this could include following what's trendy, or bidding big to show who's boss). In a perfect world, I guess, the right auction could be found for every car. I will admit that some auctions bring good prices for sellers, but I've seen the opposite.

If this 1926 Peerless Boat Tail Roadster were in the same condition as the 1929 Essex Boat Tail at Hershey this year, I would think it to be just as valuable......even though the Essex was a factory show car and aluminum-bodied. Peerless always had more of a name than Essex, and a Peerless 6-80 had quite a bit more engine, too. It's not a postwar mass-production car but is a hand-built model from a low-production, high-prestige luxury car maker. Pre-Cadillac, pre-Rolls-Royce, Pre-Duesenberg. The fact that there aren't car price-guide books that keep up with Peerless prices is more the publishers fault than the cars -- a fair number of sales are occurring. The auctioneers and price guide publishers just haven't caught up yet. If they did, it might make it harder to buy one of these cars, 'cause the price might go up a little. In a sense, Peerless cars and trucks not being as collectible as exotics 25 years ago or muscle cars 5 years ago is a good thing. Corvettes, Mustangs and tri-five Chevies are pretty trendy these days, but they made millions of them. My feeling is that Peerless will someday travel in the same circles as Duesenbergs, Marmon 16s, Shelby Mustangs, and Dodge Daytonas, collectibility-wise. Meanwhile, antique car aficianados who are interested in the car for its contribution to U.S. auto history rather than investments will be able to find them at reasonable prices.

Sorry to get up on a soapbox,

----Jeff

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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Jeff

Given the small number of Peerless in the market place, I agree that you need different make comparables like the Essex to derive value. I am just glad that Peerless cars keep popping up for the "Known Peerless List"

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I happened to stop by on my way to purchase a 1929 Gardner in Oregon and looked at the Peerless. At first glance it looks like an older restoration that has sat in a barn for 30 years. The engine never was drained and the block cracked. The mice got to the top and some of the upholstry and the moisture of Oregon has started to eat its way into some of the body. Most of the plate work looks like it is deteriating from the inside. So when you really looked at the car close up it needed a full restoration. The wood though did seem solid throughout the car. Would be a neat little car once it is restored again. But I felt like the price had to reflect the fact the car needed a full restoration. The car had a cool exhaust whistle on it. Made me smile when I saw that.

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1930harley,

Thank you for stopping by and giving us a first-hand report about this Peerless. There must be more people who read the Peerless Forum than I thought. Do you happen to remember which side the manifolds and carburetor were on if it's a Six? If on the L.S. it's a 6-80 and if on the R.S. it may be a 6-72 or 6-60. You may have actually seen the body plate on the firewall or even a coachbuilder's tag.

Gardners are pretty rare automobiles, too and you're fortunate to have found a '29. You must have bought the one for sale here on the AACA Forums a while ago with a Lycoming Straight Eight.

Thanks!

Jeff

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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I don't remember what side the carb was on. It is a six cylinder. Let me review my pictures and see if I have an answer.

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I don't have any pictures and I had been driving 11 hours when I arrived. So it's a mystery. Is there some other way to tell the series? I lucked out on the Gardner. It's the only known 8 cylinder coupe in the USA.

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That means it's a 1926 Peerless Model Six-80 Roadster. Cool.

Thank you! Philippe Mordant's thread "How To Identify Your Peerless" on the Peerless Forum tells us that it was 8U-6,181 in a run from 8U-101 to 8U-14,625 {counting spare engines}...thanks to you looking on the R.S. of the engine and checking the motor i.d. plate. These 6-80s were built from about November, 1925 to July, 1928.

The firewall should have a body plate with a number between 350 _ _ _ and 361 _ _ _ and possibly a coachbuilders tag saying "Peerless Body", "Raulang", or "Murray". I don't know yet who built the Boat Tail bodies for Peerless.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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As luck would have it.....there is more news about the 1926 Boat Tail Roadster. It has been for sale on this site: www.antiquecar.com since October 20th. The seller is listed as Danny Paddock in Fort Klamath, OR and the gentleman is asking $17,000, as is.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)

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1930harley,

Thanks for looking at that Peerless Boat Tail Roadster. I see the ad's gone already.

----Jeff

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I had a nice talk with someone today who has a Thirties straight-8 Peerless Sedan for sale. It has the original paint and sounds like an amazingly-preserved car. I believe one would have to give the battery a charge to get it running. The owner is up in years and would like to sell. It's not for sale for small money. Please PM me if you are interested.

----Jeff

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There is a 1929 Peerless 6-61 Sedan for sale on e-Bay until 2/11/13. It's gotten a dozen bids so far and was at $4400 the last time I looked. Location: Massillon, Ohio. Contrary to usual, there are lots of well-lit pictures and good description in this ad.

It's amazing how many people try to photograph a car & can't even come up with a ten-dollar light and an extension cord to improve the picture quality.

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Hi Jeff!

Yes! That was quite interesting to find that this car went for so little money, I think.

Ralph M Bohm

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Hello Ralph,

Thanks for writing. I hope you have made some progress sorting-out your new Peerless and that life at sea is agreeing with you. I'm not sure this car (recently FS on ebay) has turned up anywhere before that I know of. It does look a lot like one that appeared at auction in Berlin, Ohio in 2008 and used to be owned by someone named Mesaros.

----Jeff

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Good morning, Jeff

Well, we've put our Peerless on the "back burner" for now for a couple of reasons particularly that of time constraints. The company I work for has transferred me to the West Africa division and currently located in Holland at the shipyard in Schiedam.

When I am home, Alina (my new bride) and I are squeezing in matrimony. :-) We were married last August and I am still trying to take us on a honeymoon. Today finds me in Houston as I get ready for my first day of a 4-day class for my work aboard the drillship. But, on Saturday, I'll be home for a few weeks.

Anyway, back to the Peerless: We have her securely tucked away in a far corner of the shop and covered up. As time allows, I will begin getting the engine running. It turns over with the starter now. Ahhh, since we're on this subject, do you know where I may find the chrome steps that mount to the running boards of the '27?

PS. Alina and I are headed to Puerto Rico for our honeymoon beginning the 28th of this month for a week. I go back to work on 20th March for 28 days again.

Ralph

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