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laheyth

WHat to Make the Firewall from?

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I am restoring a 1914 Overland

The existing dash/ firewall is 3/4 ply wood, and clearly homemade.

I have some 4/4 cherry that might look good, but what is the correct dash?

Did they have plywood in 1913?

If glued up boards, should the joints be vertical?

Edited by laheyth
cant spell or type (see edit history)

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Model T Fords of the era were made of vertical planks with one layer of veneer on each side with grain horizontal. Pretty standard for the times I believe. Use plywood!

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I am using plywood for the dash in my E-M-F, but I am cutting out the edges and gluing in some solid wood so I can run screws in to the edge to hold on the trim. Screws don't tend to like to grab into the end of a piece of plywood.

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Plywood has been around for a long time .

If you have trouble with threads holding,the holes can be over drilled oversize and filled with epoxy.

Ken

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Go to a real lumber yard (not a big box warehouse) and ask for solid core plywood. Solid core is made up of solid layers of wood and you should have no problems screwing into the ends. You will need to seal up the ends with a good epoxy wood sealer to prevent rain water from wicking in the ends. Marine grade plywood, if you can find it, is the same as the old plywood used for dashboards. "Baltic Burch" plywood as another good solid core plywood.

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Marine grade plywood, if you can find it, is the same as the old plywood used for dashboards.

Marine plywood costs more than standard plywood, I don't know if they would have used it on automobiles back then or not, if plywood was available in 1914. I know they used plywood in building of PT boats during WW2, Three companies built them Higgins, Elco, and Huckins. I worked for Huckins(1978-1990) located in Jacksonville, FL. Regular marine plywood is made from the BEST Douglas Fir, and there should be NO CORE VOIDS, it has to be because it used for putting new bottoms on certain wooden boats. Plywood that says EXTERIOR is not marine, look for the "AA" grade. As to where to find it these places comes to mind try www.jamestowndistributors.com and www.westmarine.com and www.glen-l.com (but I'm sure there are others) be specific in ordering because thicknesses could be in standard or metric. They also carry the imported Bruynzeel line from Holland the very best,(they actually make a marine plywood where all the plys are mahogany) the problem with the Bruynzeel is it's probably going be in millimeters. OR go to a boatyard that does boat carpentry/ joinerwork repairs/alterations on yachts they should have marine ply. Hope this helps.

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The resawing can be finished using a band saw and the taller fence, and planer knives can be sent out to saw sharpeners. I would still use clamps where POSSIBLE in holding the template while running it though the shaper. He's right about the veneer being very thin, that was the trouble, jointers would break though the veneer, trying to flush the adjoining "wood" to the veneer.

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Thanks for the input, I laminated 3 layers of cherry, with the center core at 90 degrees to the outer pieces.( because I had some), and glued it up with west system epoxy, this gave me the 1 inch thickness shown on the drawings for the car.....it looks good.

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Plywood was in use at least by 1900 having been invented in the1800's. Marine plywood is no more waterproof than regular exterior grade plywood. It is called "Marine" because it has no voids in the interior plys and thus is more resistant to crushing from the bumps common in marine use.

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Plywood was in use at least by 1900 having been invented in the1800's. Marine plywood is no more waterproof than regular exterior grade plywood. It is called "Marine" because it has no voids in the interior plys and thus is more resistant to crushing from the bumps common in marine use.

Marine plywood is made up of laminated, solid hardwood layers. It is very stable and will hold screws in the edges for the brass/aluminum trim.

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Yea, I saw the Egyptian notation but figured the product "invented" in the 1800's was more likely what we refer to as plywood. Maybe the Egyptians used it to make "firewalls" for their chariots?

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