Roger Zimmermann

Construction of a Continental Mark II model, scale 1:12

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Don't worry Paulie! I did not know either that system before I began this project and I would have been unable to answer or guess!

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I hope you are staying safe in these funny times.

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Roger, that steering damper is so novel that the whole project is worth it just to learn that one thing! Well, there is plenty more to learn, but that's a good one. I wonder how many cars had similar things. And, when did they last use them?

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Well, those times are not so funny, but I'm staying safe!

Pat, from another forum, a member had a look under his Packard and another car I don't remember. They all had a similar system. That went away when the independent front suspension was adopted.

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When something must go wrong, it does it! That almost insignificant mobile element from the "modulator" was intended to be done is so few parts as possible and, of course so little silver soldering as possible, especially due to the fact that my gas bottle is almost empty. The new one should arrive next week, but our post system is surcharged by on-line orders.
What went wrong? A lot of bad reasoning, too much milling at the wrong place. All that required adding small elements on a part which had "consumed" already some work' hours. Finally that stupid part could be assembled temporarily on the frame with 4 springs (rather weak for the moment). The empty holes on the sides are for screws which should locate the solid axles. They will be added during the final assembly.

127 Modulator.JPG

128 Modulator.JPG

129 Modulator.JPG

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Roger

 

Long time lurker and admirer of your work.

Auburn had the same device on their  1932-33 models  and even issued a factory service bulletin to retrofit 1931 models for owners who were complaining of front end shimmy .

Their part was called a 'kick shackle' Seems like a common early 30's solution to solid front axle steering geometry issues. The adoption of Independent front suspension seems to have cured the problem until the death wobble appeared in 90's Jeep and Dodge products!

 

Brad

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As I just have only a little gas left for silver soldering, I began something needed no heat: the links for the shackles. On two previous models I did, it was just a flat part with 2 holes. On the Mark II, it was more complex. On the Cadillac model, there are 12 links: 4 at the rear of the front spings and 8 for the rear springs. At the rear, the ones at the front of the springs are shorter than at the rear, just to simplify! Those links are casted parts with the usual 2 holes for the spring's shafts and 2 more for bolts clamping the shafts. Plus other details we will see when I'm doing them.
I used one short and one long link as template to drill the other parts; next came the task to drill the holes for the clamping bolts. The bolts are just interfering the hole for the shafts; the latter have a recess to allow the bolt to be inserted. How to drill the holes with some precision relative to the holes for the shafts? The best way was to make a fixture to position the link during drilling. I took a scrap part and added a stop so I could do the 24 holes without too many difficulties.
I'm adding a picture from the original part for better understanding.

DSC01249.JPG

130 Special tool.JPG

131 Shackle links.JPG

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Roger,

There is so much work that takes place for you to build these pieces that we would never know about without your sharing the process of the construction.

Thanks again, because it makes your amazing work even that much more fascinating.

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That's right, Paulie! So much work for so insignificant parts...That's the problem when the real parts are cast; they are usually difficult to replicate.

 

The next step was to mill the recess to get a "slim link". Again, the "special tool" from the previous picture was modified to have a larger flat section to support the part in work. This tool allowed me the have rather identical large ends on both links types.
With the mill I have, the recess was like a cliff, not inclined and without a curve at the top. This was done manually with a file. In the middle of this operation, I saw that one part is missing! I'm sure I had 12 pieces, the picture done a few days ago is attesting it! Finally, I had to do another piece; I spent less time to do it as I had for the unsuccessful search!

The last operation was to mill the slit allowing the link to clamp the suspension shafts. It took a long time till I found the way to machine the slit; in fact, I used a tool which is done for large parts, but the set-up was good. Of course, my milling tool had a too small diameter to have the slit done in one operation; I had to turn the part 180° to machine the other side.

The promised gas at April 8 is still not here. I will have to search to do parts without silver soldering...

132 Milling.JPG

133 milling the slit.JPG

135 Links ready.JPG

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Roger!!  I had no idea you were doing another build!!  I've been lazy and spending less time on the forum and didn't notice you were doing a new build.  It looks incredible!!

I searched back through some posts but didn't see an overview of the new project.  Might you do a quick recap for those that got caught napping the last few months??

 

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Posted (edited)

Indeed, I had decided to do nothing more, but soon I was "unemployed"!

A better description can be seen at page 101, about in the last quarter, dated November 14: https://forums.aaca.org/topic/145354-construction-of-a-continental-mark-ii-model-scale-112/page/101/

As you were busy with other toys, I understand that you were not so often on the forum!

Edited by Roger Zimmermann (see edit history)
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Roger, I've been wanting to ask. Where do you get all your small hardware, taps, cutters, and such?  Is it from one catalog, several catalogs, or online store?  Thanks

 

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For my 2 first models, I had some metric screws and bolds I bought locally, but they were not to scale and with a cylindrical had with a slot! Then, I had the possibility once to get an interesting lot of screw for the watch industry , with diameters of 0.6, 0.7 and 0.8 mm. Over the years, I could buy more from them, but not exactly the same I had. Screws diameter 0.6mm are nice to attach lenses or inside moldings. Then, I found (I don't remember how) a store in Germany selling screws and nuts for scale models with hex had, more in scale with the reality. I got from a scale model forum the address in the US for small metric screws and nuts in stainless steel and METRIC!

Drilling bits are bought in Switzerland, as well as taps and milling tools. The brass I'm needed is coming manly from a local company, but small diameter rods have to be bought in Germany! It would be nice to have all under the same roof (or address) but it's not the case. It's almost like buying parts for an older car: depending of the brand you must deal with many shops.

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Roger,

Those pieces look great. You know that missing part will now magically appear at some point during a test assembly of those parts, for me the missing item generally appears just as I'm finishing the replacement. 😄

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Well, even if that part should magically appear, I only can keep it in the collection of mishaps if I think it's valuable enough or if I'm missing again a link! I suspect that that unfinished link is in the trash, landing here with metal chips. Not valuable enough to put the trash on the floor and inspect everything!

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The long expected gas came early last week, allowing to quit the planning and cut and silver some brass for the front support of the rear springs which is also a support for the body. This simple casting is not so easy to do with flat brass and required lot of silver soldering. It would be presumptuous to say that this is a genuine reproduction of the original part as some difference are evident for me, compared to the many pictures I have.
Both elements are soft soldered to the frame; the rivets will have to wait (anyway I don't have any at the moment) because the 3. crossmember is attached to the frame with the same rivets.
Along with the model's pictures, I'm adding a picture from the real part.
Now, I will do a body support, much easier!

DSC01167.JPG

136 Attachment point.JPG

137 Attachment point.JPG

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Recently, I did the last bracket supporting the body at the rear and soldered both sides to the rails. The rivets will be added later; they are ordered now with other screws nut, and so on.
Then, I did the  support for the running board. If the vertical support was easy to shape, the horizontal part of it required a pattern to shape it. With a scrap material, the shape was done by filing the excess brass away. It took much more time to do the pattern than to shape both parts on it!
The vertical and horizontal elements were assembled with soft soldering; smaller rivets have to be added. If you are looking well at the picture, you will notice that the lower part from the vertical element does not match exactly the shape of the horizontal one. Error from me or bad design? No! The similar parts on a V-8 frame are perfectly aligned but, as the frame from the V-16 is one inch deeper, the factory used the same vertical parts and had to do a different horizontal part to have the same distance between the floor and running board, creating that misalignment.

When I was in Germany to measure the frame, I knew I would miss important dimensions. The position to the running board support is one of them! The second cross-member is located near to the bracket, but I don't have his position either. I will have to wait until transmission and engine are done to locate the cross-member and brackets. By adding the length of the engine pan and transmission, I should get the real position from that cross-member, but something is not right: all engines are supported at the rear by two side supports; they are located by a hole at the frame; fortunately, I measure it. V-16 and V-8 have not the same support for whatever reason (probably the shape). However, all transmissions are the same. If I'm measuring the distance from that hole to the cross-member on the illustration from the V-8 frame in the shop manual , I have a considerable difference compared to my calculated position. I don't know why, I will maybe find it; the shape from the side supports and their location at the end of the engine could be the solution.

138 Brackets.JPG

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Roger would it be possible to measure from the rear forward using the drive shaft tube dimensions to double-check the transmission crossmember location ?

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Posted (edited)

That's a good suggestion. Unfortunately I did not took that dimension and to drive 600 miles one way just for that is out of question! Anyway, even if that cross-member is not at the right place, once the back of the transmission is attached to it, who will care?

Anyway, the difference is  7mm (0.28") wich is rather large.

By looking and looking again at the various pictures I have (V-8 and V-16), I find sometimes answers to questions I have. Who knows, I will maybe find here too!

Edited by Roger Zimmermann (see edit history)
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Always a treat Roger. Just incredible work. John

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 As always, such amazing work. Your painstaking attention to detail astounds me every time!

Keith

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Thanks Keith! As you know, the details are taking the most time, no matter is the car is mall or if it's a real one!

 

Some time ago, I wrote about rivets and my thinking that most cannot be real rivets, but only for show, mostly when the other side of the rivet was obstructed, like the upper and flanges from the frame.
The problem was the same for the running board's brackets. The rivets for those parts are smaller (at least I have this impression) than the ones used on the frame. I tried with the proper quickly done tools to rivet by using a rod diameter 0.8mm (0.03") from a very soft brass. The main issue is to have the proper length which I had after one try. Therefore, the first 8 rivets from that model are done with a decent head in front like in the rear of the part. The head I got is a tad larger than the initial diameter which is what I expected.

139 Small rivets.JPG

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WOW Roger, that riveting is hard enough to do at full size, let alone at small scale, excellent work.

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