oldcar

Early 1920s Studebaker ?

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Please do not think I am ignoring all your messages of support. I cannot explain why I have some very black days, They just sneak up on me and Ker-pow-ie!  Stand well back. 

Rest assured work is continuing on the Studebaker. I am about to turn it around (with my trusty trolley jack) which will be good fun as I virtually have to turn it through 360 degrees in its own length. I have cut out all the side trim panels and only have the two foot well "kick boards" to cut out. I have to go out tomorrow to buy some black velour to line the door pockets and the "glove box"* that is to go into the passenger side of the dash-board. 
*I know that this will be "non-original" but it is a convenience that I have grown used to. Having one in all "my cars".

Door pockets are OK but they have their limitations. The Studebaker will still have a pocket in each door too, as original but I find with the "Flap" over the door pockets, you virtually have to come to a stop and open the door to get access to the front door pocket(s).

 

Without a "glove box" where would I put my little tin of peppermints? All weight-watchers please note these are Sugarfree.

The tin holds .34g or 17 serves of .2g each. Please do not ask me to count them. Once you tip them out to count them, you can never put them all back into the tin.

I still have to work out a use for the empty tins. They cost Aust $2. per tin when on "special' at the supermarket, perhaps I should save all my loose $2 coins in them.  Now I wonder how many $2 coins I could fit in a tin?

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Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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The Jergens insert might work. I've been told to not recommend anything not specifically made for spark plugs so don't want to get in trouble. I think you should get one, look it over, see how the spark plug screws into it and how it seats then decide if you'll go ahead with installing.

 

You would then need a tap and drill. I think it was 24mm-1.5mm pitch and 57/64 inch drill

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/S-1pcs-24mm-x-1-5-Metric-HSS-Right-hand-Thread-Tap-M24-x1-5-mm-High-quality/301897593281?

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/57-64-size-HSS-Morse-MTS-MT-2-Drill-Drillbit-Dormer-A130/322185718996?

 

Or you can have a custom insert made at a machine shop like you said in the very beginning. It should not be too difficult. Inside M18-1.5 and outside threads greater than 22mm with maybe a lip so it can be screwed down and tightened.

 

Are the spark plugs you will use "washer-seat" as opposed to "taper-seat"?

 

There are no off the shelf spark-plug specific inserts available to fit the large hole you have unless you are willing to go back to the larger 7/8-18 size spark plugs.

 

 

 

 

 

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Hello  Mike

I too would hate to see you "in trouble". I don't know where that came from.

I am waiting for a reply from Jergen's. Personally I think that their's is the best option. I am sure "Steve" could easily make something similar but I do not like pulling him off whatever he is doing he is currently; building a second Pizza (oven) trailer and rebuilding his second VW (2-3 tonne) van, which is all about making his & his family's livelihood. There is no great rush to have the Studebaker's engine running. I am not planing to drive it anywhere soon.  The 18mm plugs are a standard "washer seat" Champion D16. I have a million other things to be doing on it.

 

Bj.

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This morning's task, although it may appear a little premature, has been to strip the original black linoleum from the left hand side running board. This can shortly be (will be) replaced by new black linoleum but this morning's work was mainly to look at the original "boards". These are again more evidence of the cars reclusive life over the past seventy six years. Having removed all the little tacks that had been put in at some time to secure the lino', I could inspect the entire surface of the step. This I should point out is a soft wood, probably one of the many species of pine. Having spent perhaps 15 or 20 minutes first with  my angle grinder and then with an orbital sander, I am amazed. There will certainly not be any need to repair or replace any of it.   As could be expected the adhesive used to secure the linoleum in 1920 has largely dried out and lost all its adhesion qualities but the timber itself is absolutely sound and will not require any repair or replacement. At least to me, a sure indication of the dormant nature of the cars sheltered existence from 1941 to today.

This afternoon I can turn the car around and start work on the right hand side.

 

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Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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I could say "No sooner said than done". Certainly my new trolley jack does make things a little easier . And not knowing the dead weight of the Studebaker must contribute something. Either way I can say "Jobs done! and I can start working on the right hand side of the car. Not having Helen's VW parked in its usual spot on the right hand side of the carport certainly made my task a little easier. Looking at the timber in this side running board it is apparent that I may have to do a tiny piece of repair to the extreme end of the running board where it attaches to the bottom edge of the rear mudguard. (fender). I will not know to what extent this repair is required until I get all the old Linoleum adhesive sanded off. One thing that is clear is that the right hand side of the car  did not suffer the same amount of "knocks and abrasions" as the left had.

 

Bj.DSCN5701.thumb.jpg.4f12537ec28dd377d11f2c9fff376320.jpgDSCN5699.thumb.jpg.5e4bf3b0a7a99a1463b8f21c1d4b9624.jpg

 

 

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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"One thing that is clear is that the right hand side of the car  did not suffer the same amount of "knocks and abrasions" as the left had."  Remember it is a Right Hand Drive car and that the left side is the "kerb" side

Either very early on the Studebaker had a very short owner/driver or they may have lost the parking "guide" from the left front mudguard.

This would have had a "standard" about 12 inches long standing vertical from it. It would have had a ball or tear-drop attached to the top so the driver could judge where the car was in relation to an obstacle on the road-side. That this one lost it's vertical secition may go some way to explain the "parking" damage to the outside edge of both front and rear mudguards (fenders). while the drivers side is almost completely un-scathed

 

bj.

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Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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Hi Bernie,

The floorboards and running boards were made from hard yellow pine.  Like mine, yours looks to be in very nice shape and very minor restoration is needed. The original linoleum was a light gray color, not black. Your 97 year old linoleum has most likely dried out and darkened with age. Nice original picture on the Shorpy Site shows an original car  http://www.shorpy.com/node/19827?size=_original#caption. I have several other original photos that also show the light gray contrast and you can see the original 1922 Special Six Photos I posted a week or so ago showing the same.

Scott

 

 

 

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Thank you Scott

I will need to go back and look at the suppliers range of colours.  I still think that for my car that the contrast between the black mudguards and chassis rails together with the dark blue body, a light grey may look out of place. I need to put my "thinking hat" on to give this the necessary thought. As you are all too aware I am not necessarily a slave to originality. I tend to work on the rationale "if it looks right it is possibly OK."

 

Bj.

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I never know which way you'll be leaning ;) so just giving you the info.

 

By black mudguards are you referring to those curvy things that go over the wheels? 

Scott

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I have now sent two orders, one for the "repair sleeve" from Jergens and a 24mm tap from Ebay, so something will happen eventually. I have a heap of other things to do so I do not expect to be too bored.

I am hopeless at waiting for paint to dry.

 

Bj

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At long last I have now learnt where to hood (top) for the Studebaker has ended up. I hope to be able to go and collect it next week.

It is certainly off the beaten track, up in the hill country of Victoria, anyone interested in seeing some our beautiful country could try finding in on Google maps:- Sargoods Road, Goorman, Vic Aust. 

 

Bj

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We are going to Goorman next Tuesday to collect the Stude Top but now I am wondering if it will fit into Helen's VW Jetta trunk.  Can some one please give me the measurement for the length of the bows from the pivot point to the top of the bow.

 

Thank you

 

Bernie j.

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On 11/14/2017 at 4:59 PM, Stude Light said:

By black mudguards are you referring to those curvy things that go over the wheels? 

Scott

Bernie

Since you are from German ancestry ,you should know the German word for fender or mudguard " KOTFLUGEL" which would translate to feces wing.

On the old open cars it was to keep the shit of the inside of the car.

Maybe the American "fender" was to fend off similar  substances.

 


 
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If you had told my grandfather that he was a German he would have had a fit. Despite the fact that he had lived here in Australia for over 60 years he even changed the spelling of our name in 1914 to "anglicise"it. There was a strong anti-semitic sentiment long before Hitler came to power in the then new state of Germany. This was formed by the combining of several principalities. Hanover being just one. You need to brush up on your European History.

He left the Jewish faith when he married my grand-mother, a protestant in the 1860's. 

 

Bj.

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The gypsy top is 147cm wide, 105cm tall (from the pivot) and about 30cm in height when collapsed and folded up. The longest bow support is the rear one that angles backwards at 45 degrees (105cm). The next tallest is the one over the rear seat at 81cm. Hopefully it will fit in the Jetta. 1510969604739899636268.thumb.jpg.b2ff2361c1b226447b1cb11cb0e174cc.jpg

Scott

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Sorry to say, I have not been following your progress throughout the twelve pages of postings. I saw and read it when you first began, and just happened by again today (having noticed a new update date). Going straight to the last (12th) page, I found comments about the running boards. 

A long time ago, when I was restoring the 1925 Studebaker ER coach that I used to have, I had an interesting run-in with the running boards. One side was in excellent condition, needing only new covering (gray linoleum by the way). The other side had been involved in some sort of incident, resulting in much of the board being broken away and lost. This was long before the internet, and getting answers to many questions was far more difficult and time consuming than what we have available today. So, after many phone calls, a few letters, and lots of bad advice, I found my way to a business that specialized in exotic woods for specialized construction, arts, crafts, and restorations (fantastic!). And it wasn't even very far away. So, after a few phone calls, I headed off, with a big chunk of the broken original running board along for the ride.

Now, like one of your comments above, I don't try to be a perfectionist. I usually try to make things "as close to correct as I reasonably can". I wasn't looking to get an exact match, just something close to correct. I wander into the place, introduce myself, and hand my remnant over to the fellow. Turned out, THIS guy was amazing! And he really knew wood. I had said that I wanted something close, not necessarily an exact match (which he obviously did not hear, first impression, not the best). As soon as he began looking over the piece, his eyes lit up, he exclaimed *WHERE did you get THIS???" I repeated that it was from my '25 Studebaker, and that I wanted something close to match it. He told me the specific species of fir (I wish I could remember the name?) and gave me a rundown on its history and how it related to numerous other types of fir. He told me that that particular species hadn't been commercially harvested or used since World War II, but that there were a couple possible sources in the USA where it could probably be had, for a price. He then recommended using a carefully chosen piece of common Douglas Fir, as it was nearly the same, and as long as I got good straight cross grain it would be fine.

As it had been a slow day in the exotic woods business, we chatted about wood for a bit longer. They provided special wood for the restoration of musical instruments among so many other things. He seemed very knowledgeable, on a wide range of special woods, where they were grown, and their uses. I enjoyed meeting him, and would like to have had more opportunities to discuss the subject. But never saw him again.

 

Good luck with that Studebaker!

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Thank you Wayne

Fortunately for me both running boards are in very restorable condition. I did panic for a moment when I thought the a small section from one rear corner had gone missing. Imagine my relief when I found it swinging still attached by one very loose nut and bolt to the rear fender.

 

Bj.

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Moving right along as "they used to say", perhaps this should be titled how to fill in one of those spare hours on a Sunday morning. I have now recovered the errant corner of running board. This is an essential part of the cut out placed so that the enthusiastic owner of the 1920s could reach the oiler for the rear spring shackle pin with his trusty oil can. No doubt doing his weekly weekend schedule of maintenance on the Studebaker. The end of the running board had originally been slotted to take a strip of timber across the end to strenghten it where it bolted to the fender.

To replace this and so effect the repair I cut a 1/4 inch thick strip from an off cut of "Australian River Red Gum". This is an incredibly strong and virtually water proof timber. As the name implies it grows along the banks of some of our larger rivers i.e. the Murray River, in a similar manner to Willows. It virtually grows with its roots in the water. In the past it was a favourite timber for Australian house builders to use for foundation "stumps".

Having sanded it down to a nice "tap in" fit this was given a generous coating of water proof glue and carefully tapped into place.  All that this will now require is re-drilling the fixing hole where the edge of the fender is attached.  Once it is covered by some new linoleum no one will even know. Yes, I will be filling the old nail holes etc and will give the entire running board a final clean up with my sander. I do also have the original metal surounds that protect the timber edge to the "oiler access hole". No! I will not be nickel plating them. The one from the other side needs a minor repair and then they will be both painted black.

 

Bj5a10d12f09349_Runningboardrepair5.thumb.jpg.07b19c96a5f95d94ee66089044e4643e.jpg

 

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Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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I believe those are made from zinc. It cleans up well but tarnishes quickly. I guess you won't have that problem if you paint them though. The were originally just polished and the only thing that was nickel plated were the slotted spiral nails that held them on.

 

Looks like you are making some good progress.

 

On 11/17/2017 at 2:24 PM, rbk said:

the German word for fender or mudguard " KOTFLUGEL" which would translate to feces wing.

On the old open cars it was to keep the shit of the inside of the car.

Bob,

That's pretty funny. I looked up fender and it appears to have been derived from defender..Maybe defending yourself from mud or feces.

Scott

Edited by Stude Light (see edit history)

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I will have a go at cleaning them with some toothpaste and an old brush, Not the one I  am currently using for dental hygiene. Tooth paste is quite a good scratch free abrasive.  Just do not let your wife/girl-friend/partner* catch you using her/their brush.  
 

Bj.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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Having cleaned and polished one of my "zinc" escutcheon plates I have decided that a nice coat of paint is just what the doctor ordered. This will happen only after I have decided on the most appropiate colour Linoleum to use as this will be carried through into the front foot-well. (toe boards, or what ever the official designation is) and will co-ordinate with the rear carpet. It may also have some influence on the colour and design for the "Lap rug". People with long memories may recall the "Faux Ocelot" lap rug especially made to fit in with the colour schene of the 1922 Packard Single Six Convertible Coupe.  

forums.aaca.org+My+next+project+1922+Packard

To save you from all the effort of scrolling through a lot of pages of "waffle" I have lifted the relevant photograph for you. You however may like to look at another one of my "lost cause rescues".

Last I knew, the car was still in Australia but I have not actually heard anything of it since a week or two after I sold it. 

I think from driving it a couple of times that it was potentially a really nice car. I hope that the present owner where-ever he or she is appreciate all the effort that went into it.

 

Bj.

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Edited by oldcar (see edit history)

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Hello Scott

Thank you for your p.m.

I have just returned fron a 250 mile round trip to rescue the TOP. Unfortunately it has been very badly stored for the past six years, so the fabric is all but falling apart. It is undoubtedly the original.  At the sort of values you are suggesting, my only alternative is to fold it up as best I can and have a new "Bag/envelop" made to cover it up whilst it is attached to the rear of the car. At least the folding frame is intact. I certainly am not ready to sell the car right now but more than ever I will keep a close watch over the budget. 

I have also received the repair "kit" from Jergens in the mail today so hopefully that will take me one step closer to having the motor running.

I am still waiting for the 24MM x1.5 Tap to arrive so I can attend to the stripped spark-plug thread.

 

Bernie.DSCN5710.thumb.jpg.c3921a1cc98d299e48897c109bb595a4.jpg

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