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Early 1920s Studebaker ?


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  • 2 years later...

Just to continue on the studebaker's interesting story, I have just bought it! It is currently in Yorkshire, England and I hope that it will be delivered to me here in Ireland on Saturday!. I will continue to post on its  progress.  For a car that hasn't driven since 1941, it's sure managing to travel the world!! 

Donal. 

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Congratulations Donal

One of the first things that you will need to do is to find and buy a new cylinder head. They are available in the USA and possibly here in Australia.

Other wise the car should still be in excellent mechanical condition. If you are that way inclined you can easily leave the exterior as an "Oily Rag"  but from memory the interior had suffered the ravages of time and will need completely re-doing. I will watch with interest I will be watching over your shoulder so PLEASE don't do as it seems the owners in between you and me seem to have done, and simply say to all your friends "Look what I have just bought" then close the garage doors and forget all about  it.  Having said that, Please do not start tearing it apart into a thousand pieces and then consign it into the "too hard bin".

 

Remember I will be watching you with great interest.

 

Bernie j.

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From memory there was very little wrong with the car other than the cylinder head. New castings were available at the time I sold the car and should still be around. I am sure that some of the other Stude owners can help put you in the right direction. You have the makings of a really interesting car.

Bj.

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Well the Studebaker arrived, safe and sound. Very happy, spent today trying to work out what's what! A good few things have been disconnected, mainly around the fuel vacuum pump, the brakes and the throttle pedal seems to be missing. 

Parts that will be needed over coming weeks, 

1,Bolts/screws that hold radiator to shroud, radiator has been reconditioned by last owner. 

2,Throttle pedal /linkage

3, the throttle leaver on the steering wheel. 

Any advice on how the fuel system works (vacuum pump) 

I hope to get it running reasonably soon, then look at the seats!! The Bsa 10hp saloon I have was off the road since 1971 and got it back up and running recently. 

Again I'd appreciate any leads on where I could get spares, thanks in advance, Donal 

IMG_20200822_161031.jpg

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Original radiator to shroud screws are a 10-24x1/2” slotted countersunk screw with a lock washer and square nut. The throttle levers are common to a number of makes....I would keep a look out on eBay. You want one as pictured. There are a number of throttle pedal linkage setups. I recall this car originally came with a magneto but may have been converted to a distributor. I would need to know which setup you have and I can get you the schematic.....it may already be in the 15 pages of posts. If you want to PM me your email, I’ll send you info on the fuel pump.

Scott

8701A826-B6D8-4A86-A0F5-0AD1F8306F5B.jpeg

Edited by Stude Light (see edit history)
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Page 6, first post has a close up of the steering wheel controls.  Page 7 about half way down has the picture of the linkage rods for a Right Hand Car (RHC) with Magneto.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hello Both Stude Light  & Donal F.

I am sorry but the Stude was such a brief interlude in my life with old cars that I feel that I really am not qualified to comment.

I believe that the only way to bring it back to life after such a long period of inaction will be to fit or if necessary have a new cylinder head made if this has not already been done. It certainly deserves to be given a second chance.

 

Bernie j.

aka "oldcar".

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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Donal

I have a lot of parts for that car.

I believe a sold you a throttle lever.

Let me know what else you need.

Robert Kapteyn

studebaker@mac.com

 

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Hi Robert, 

Many thanks for the reply. The parts I currently need are the magneto lever/horn button that would be on the steering wheel, also the exhaust manifold to the carburettor pipe/cover that clips on the exhaust manifold and joins with inlet of the carburettor. 

Let me know if you have any and we can sort payment etc, 

Cheers, 

Donal Flynn 

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  • 1 month later...
12 hours ago, Donal f said:

Quick question, the ring gear is quite worn, is it possible to change it separately or was the flywheel all the one casting? Cheers Donal 

The ring gear is pressed on to the flywheel. I would suggest heating it to press it off/on. You can usually just press it on the other way and get some better teeth unless it is really bad. The service manual should cover this.
 

is the starter not engaging? It would have to be unusable before I would want to risk accidentally breaking it.

Scott

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I had already written the post below but had not "posted it.

Stude Light has far more experience than me, with Studebakers. The alternative I suggested earlier rotating the flywheel by 90 degrees works the same but you would have to change all the timing marks, TDC, etc to suit. 

 

The experienced Stude people should be able to confirm exactly what your car has but in my own very limited knowledge of Studebaker practice I would think that as far as a replacement was concerned It would need to be SHRUNK on. But first you need to have a replacement. You will probably have to turn the old gear off the flywheel. The Replacement needs to be brought up to "RED Heat" then carefully lowered into place. You will not have too much time for adjustments so if you are not confident in doing this you are better to leave it to someone with some considerable experience. You do not get a second chance or time to fiddle about with it. If you know a friendly "Black-smith" it may pay to talk to them.

The other alternative may be to rotate the flywheel through 90 degrees, thus changing the point of entry and maximum load.  You probably should have the flywheel and crankshaft "balance" checked again after you have replaced the ring gear. The two photographs show two Ring-gears so you can have some idea of what we are talking about. The second photo shows the "point of entry" which has the most wear/damage.

Extremely high compression and/or too much ignition advance can lead to the possibility of "Back-firing" leading to damage to both the ring-gear and the starter pinion. 

 

Bernie j.

DSCN7014.thumb.jpg.91a8a199e5f50c5988cbc0fd81be7d25.jpgDSCN7015.thumb.jpg.fc8de4f82e2dab6b315a481095386757.jpg

 

Bj.

Edited by oldcar (see edit history)
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