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alsancle

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Interesting perspective on the "debate."

I don't think it's so much a debate on Voison as it is about aesthetics of the car that won Pebble Beach. Some like the design, most don't. No one suggested that Gabriel Voison's engineering was not worthy.

The restoration on Mullin's car is so spectacular, you can't help but appreciate it. In my opinion, though, aesthetics takes a back seat to condition at Pebble, which is mandated in that the only cars elegible to win Best of Show have to first win Best of Class, which is determined by points only. Kind of gives a new definition to concours d'elegance, in my opinion... concours écouter.

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I think people would be surprised by the number of PB best of show winners that have been "tweaked" during restoration. I can think of a particular Mercedes that had the spares moved from the fenders to the rear. Whatever the modifications, I can't imagine the car looked better prior to them.

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Here is one with a Dubos body that I like but may not be universally loved. At this point they were using supercharged Graham engines. I recall this car selling at one of the Pebble Beach auctions.

EDIT: Note the subdued original colors and the showy later transformation.

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Edited by alsancle (see edit history)

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Has anyone seen the stereo brochure,,the one needing those funny glasses to see,,

I think was around '26--33 maybee Kitty said her grandfather made very nice cars,,Ben

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I'll comment here since this seems to be more of an "appreciation" thread, but I rather like the PB winner, the line extending from the cowl through the subtle curve of the lower door glass opening then leads visually into the arc of the rear fender profile. Very elegant and not immediately noticeable to the eye, but recognized by the brain instantly. My favorite form of auto design are those that require you to try to figure out why you perceive an automobile in a certain way, despite what you think you see at first glance. So many fine details here, truly like admiring a sculpture in a museum garden, I would enjoy viewing it unrushed on the greens somewhere.

I do agree that the flat top versions look best, a more mean-spirited design that evokes even greater emotions, but they still retain the cues I've noted.

While I may not prefer the support strakes, they are evocative of the company origins and reminiscent of bi-plane wing supports.

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Yikes, it's back!...All kidding aside, I think the body lines are interesting and unique, but that interior makes me want to hit somebody (fureur de route, anyone?)

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I don't personally love the interior either but I appreciate it, especially when you consider the context of the era. We know it's wild today, but imagine what it must have looked like at the time!

BTW, your Zephyr is one universally appealing beauty. Enjoy her!

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Thanks, Marrs: I sort of think of the Zephyr coupe as a poor man's Delahaye ;). BTW, even though my first *running* car was my Mustang, my first car of any sort was a 1963 MB 220SEb which I bought when I was 13 with my paper route savings. Needless to say, my folks were nonplussed, but I actually made a $200 profit when I sold it -- still not running -- 9 months later :)

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That must have been one long summer delivering papers, but perhaps they were less costly when you found yours. I had my share of non-runners/pipe-dream cars as a kid, I went in on two cars with different friends, one was a '63 Cadillac hearse the other was a Jaguar MKX sedan (I already had an XJ6L that was my daily). Neither of those cars ever moved, but we lost money on both. My first running car was a 1957 Cadillac Series 60, leghorn beige with the most lovely original bronze painted metal and tapestry interior. 50,000 original miles, I think I will post looking for info on that car in the Cadillac forums now!

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It'd be interesting to hear about Voisins from someone who both owned and worked on them. You get the impression they were essentially what was called an "assembled" car as were Elcar, Gardner, Jordan in the US, perhaps more akin to Auburn-Cord, which used existing Lycoming engines, despite the fanciful Gallic styling. France enjoyed a system of smooth, well-established roads long before we did, and Paris is flat, nothing like Pittsburgh, PA or San Francisco, so wildly overhanging coachwork is a wee bit more practical there-- the French always more willing to suffer for fashion than us.

From what we've heard, the Knight sleeve-valve engine is one of those constructs that sounds better than it really was, a notorious oil burner. Smooth as any inline six has natural balance, but at a cost in horrific oil consumption.

Anyone amongst those here gathered have real world experience, long trips, casual use of Voisins? Meanwhile, would love to hear more about the three Voisin inline 12s; a pair of existing sixes end-to-end. Bore/stroke, did they have a periodic? How were they, really? Only three were built, the back of the rearmost block intruding upon the driver's compartment, disguised as a console. Equally, it'd be a nice comparison with the one-off 1929 Packard monobloc straight 12 as this is about all we could find:

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Edited by Water Jacket (see edit history)

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I can't disagree with anything you are saying, except maybe to quibble a bit with Auburn-Cord being an "assembled" car. E.L owned Lycoming too so it wasn't just part of the overall corporate entity and the bodies were all built by E.L companies.

The definitive Voisin book is Automobiles Voisin: 1919-1958 by Pascal Courteault which I unfortunately cannot find for less than $1,100.

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The car in person is stunning, and stunning is inadiquate. It is a "MagnifiCAR." I had never seen a Voison in person, but saw many during the CCCA Membership meet in California. I am very happy to report the "Voisin" in the horrible movie "Sahara" is fiberglass with an Olds engine. We saw it as well. As there is nothing about a Voisin that looks like any other car, I doubt it can be called assembled. BTW, ALL modern production cars are "Assembled." There are no major auto manufacturing plants left in the USA, and I suppose elsewhere.

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There is an excellent, comprehensive chapter on Gabriel Voisin and his cars in the book edited by Barker and Harding, titled "Automobile Design: Great Designers and their Work".

The man himself was an extraordinary work of art. The use of a Graham engine when he no longer had financial control was an extreme insult to him and his standards. (I know perfectly well that a Graham engine could be indestrucible provided it was not run without oil and water: Henry Formby drove an old barred-up Graham in the mid-late 1950s in what they called "Stock car racing" here, where the winner was the last car running; and it was impossible to blow that Graham engine up). But it changed the character of the the Voisin cars. You would have to drive a Voisin to be able to give an authoritative opinion on what they were like. What is known is that they were amazingly fast between distant points, recording better trip times than more powerful highly rated cars. Voisin was outraged his after his cars had won first, second, third, and fifth places in the production car class of the 1922 Grand Prix at Stasbourg because of their light weight and excellent aerodynamic characteristics. The ACF changed the rules to ban streamlining, so he entered his cars as racing cars, even though everyone was too dumb to understand the point.

Stuart Middlehurst and I jointly bought a Voisin in about 1963, which a previous owner had altered to fit a 6 litre 6 cylinder cuff-valve Peugeot and a Minerva gearbox. What happened to the 4 litre Voisin engine with its gearbox, and what happened to the rest of the Peugeot(s?) is not known. The next owner partly pulled it apart till he learned that it was a practical impossibility. Stuart and I would share ownership of interesting items that no-one else would touch at the time and we payed fifty pounds for this. Stuart is no longer with us, and I have gathered enough Peugeot parts from seven or eight lost cars to rebuild an authentic car. ( One restored car in France is the only other one of these known to be left; though a former owner here, who also owned 6.5 lire Hispano Suiza and Tipo 8 Isotta Fraschini at the time, rated the Peugeot more highly than those).

The Voisin eventually went to a friend in New Zealand, who is a former owner of one of the small Voisins. He still has no engine. There used to be a correct engine at Ponderosa Ranch near Reno, Nevada. I have a photo of it with the block removed. Does anyone know where it, or another spare engine, are , so that Michael Rose can restore his car to drive? If we can get an engine we can fix it. ( I can use a molybdenum wire-feed thermospray coating to rebuild the junk-head rings so compression does not leak past them to blow oil into the exhaust. You can actually compel a sleeve-valve engine to give up smoking ). The body is one of Voisin's own manufacture; and it is a sports type for four passengers with a rounded back.

I never worry that many of Voisin's cars look different and not totally of a style I would most admire. I appreciate that he always built them to best satisfy their intended purpose.

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Ivan, this doesn't have anything to do with Voisins, just the Peugeots. I understand that apart from your Type 156's, there is a restored Type 156 in France (painted red, I think), as well as a couple of unrestored Type 156's in Melbourne? (belonging to a restoration workshop?). I'm very interested in the cuff valve Peugeots, if you can add any info, and the fact there seem to be so many in Australia.

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Edited by Craig Gillingham (see edit history)

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Winning a class at Pebble Beach is not determined by points only - there are often multiple 100 point cars in a class.To separate those the class judges are given a 10% "elegance factor". That said, I strongly feel that this system is still superior to the "walk by" judging.

Interesting perspective on the "debate."

I don't think it's so much a debate on Voison as it is about aesthetics of the car that won Pebble Beach. Some like the design, most don't. No one suggested that Gabriel Voison's engineering was not worthy.

The restoration on Mullin's car is so spectacular, you can't help but appreciate it. In my opinion, though, aesthetics takes a back seat to condition at Pebble, which is mandated in that the only cars elegible to win Best of Show have to first win Best of Class, which is determined by points only. Kind of gives a new definition to concours d'elegance, in my opinion... concours écouter.

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