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Hey guys, we have a Voisin c7 in our family, with a body of copper, but we dont have any documentation before 1961, or atleast something around that time. But we would gladly get our hands on more information about the car. If you have any questions, feel free to ask!

This car is in Sweden btw.

post-109897-143143088346_thumb.jpg

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We don't really know, when my grandpa bought it in 1961, it had black paint on all the copperparts, but the car looked like this, except the paintjob. They also found out that it was made from copper.

The car has been covered in a garage for the latest 20-something years. So that's why we dont have so much knowledge about it

A few months ago, a swedish magazine wrote an article about it, and tried to find more info from france, but they didn't find anything that we already knew.

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I knew an old time car collector who used a 1924 Willys Knight 4 cylinder as a tour car in the sixties and seventies. He told me it burned a quart of oil in the first 60 miles, after that, nothing. Next day a quart in the first 60 miles, after that, nothing no matter how far he drove it. It seemed to take that long to completely warm up and work correctly.

Whether this is typical or just his car I have no way of knowing.

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I don't know where you get the idea Voisin was an assembled car.Before turning to cars, Voisin had a completely equipped airplane factory. The car was a reconversion project after WW1, because he knew there would be little or no market for airplanes for years, considering the war was over and there were thousands of war surplus planes and engines going begging.

 

The sleeve valve car was designed for one of France's major auto makers but they rejected it in favor of a more conventional model. So the designers took it to Voisin who siezed the opportunity to produce a brand new car with the design and development work already done.

 

At that time car makers made only the chassis, the bodies being made by specialist coachbuilders. At least that was the rule in Europe, for the more expensive cars.

 

So Voisin began turning out cars of unique design, heavily influenced by aircraft principles and the remorseless logic of the engineer. They weren't always pretty, but you could bet that every unusual feature had sound reasons behind it.

 

You might call the Graham based cars "assembled" but that was the last gasp of a defunct company, after Gabriel Voisin left the firm.

Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)
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