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Fixture to hold DB front fender for straightening?


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I'm trying to straighten the passenger-side front fender on my 1922 touring car.  The front of it got pushed back, and I need to pull it forward.  That chrome vanadium steel requires a lot of force to pull it, so I need to bolt the fender securely to a fixture in order to do it successfully.  I would very much appreciate hearing about fixtures that you have made or used, or that you think would serve, to hold a DB front fender for body work.  I'm just not at all clear about what kind of fixture to construct.  Thank you.

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Yes, that would be easier than building a fixture to hold it, I must admit.  It is probably just that I am emotionally invested in the idea of building such a fixture because I recently obtained the tools and materials necessary to make one and to attach it to the concrete floor.  I'd like to hear any other suggestions, though.

Edited by 22touring (see edit history)
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Your goal should be to reverse the force that made the dent exactly. Of course that is usually impossible, but it should be your goal. The closer you can come to that, the less straightening work you will have once it is pulled. Pull it just a little further than you need because there will be some spring-back.

 

That is generic advice for any dent or damage. Pictures would help us answer better what to do. Nevertheless, the best jig is most likely whatever it was bolted to when it got dented.

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Both the front fenders on my 32 Dodge Brothers sedan were pushed in after the previous owner rear ended a truck.  We pushed them back out using a hydraulic ram while they were still attached to the frame.  I’ll post some pictures when I get home.

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Here are some shots of the fenders on my DL being pushed back into shape.  i would strongly suggest pushing rather than pulling, as you have more control.  I honestly doubted my fenders could be saved, but they came out looking brand new.

 

fd1.thumb.jpg.746b0dcb9e0d21fde5106c94bf10d745.jpg

 

fd2.thumb.jpg.213b3641e92baaf1e1669d6d56066ceb.jpg

 

fd3.thumb.jpg.3cea9cc2723a13e0c689afb504e27592.jpg

 

fd4.thumb.jpg.5cbf1ca734be063b07c066d751ebf812.jpg

 

fd5.thumb.jpg.90648aa976de0c53189c0391245c6763.jpg

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6 hours ago, Fossil said:

Excellent work. What was the other end anchored against? 

 

Part of the frame, a bracket that supports the sidemounts.  Without the bracket we would have made one and attached it to the frame.  I was amazed at how little force it actually took to force the fender back into shape.  We used the hydraulic ram slowly and in small increments to assure accuracy.  The secret was the correct placement of the end of the ram on the inside of the fender.  The fender was damaged in 1970, so it had been like that for 44 years before we fixed it.

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