Hubert_25-25

Tar Strips under Aprons and Hood sill

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I am getting close (maybe closer is a better term) to being able to set the body back on the frame, but I need a little guidance please.  My body was off the car for decades and then hastily rebolted to the chassis to make it look like a car and to allow for transport.  The tar strips from between the apron and the frame were in a box.  The body has 1/4" thick rubber pads that are nailed to the bottom side of the wood frame.  I think where these touch the frame, they did not put any tar strips under these rubber pads.  Can anyone verify this?  

I am also wondering how much of "under the apron" had tar strips under it.   Did they put anything between the frame and the hood sill?  I numbered some of my questions in the slides as well.

Any help is appreciated.   Thank you,    Hugh

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I don’t know the answer.   However, what would it hurt to put them in?  Hard or impossible to see, and will possibly protect and prevent a squeak or rattle.

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Hugh

 

Wow, you are making great progress!

I would use the the 'tar strips' anywhere painted sheet metal surfaces attach. I think they commonly call it 'anti-squeak' for a reason although I'm not sure that you will be able hear the squeaking over the road noise of an open car!

Plus you wouldn't want all the hard work of getting the paint on the metal to be undone.

I use roofing felt available from Home Depot. A $30 roll will do about 100 cars . The stuff I have in my shop right now is .045" so you could double it up if you wanted to duplicate what you have.

I ordered an anti squeak kit for my 52 Chev and in some places the new product had the same  2" guideline markings on it that you find on the roll of roofing felt!

3M feather spray contact adhesive to hold it in place while you put it together.

 

Brad

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Heavier material can be had as expansion strip for sidewalks and other concrete work.

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Don, Brad, and Larry,

     Thanks for the advise.  I am going to see if I can find one of your tar paper suggestions at Lowes.  I think Buick did lay some of the painted surfaces together during initial assembly.  I know that they did not use any fender welting in 1925.  Not sure when the practice of using fender welting was started.  I did buy some "asphalt treated webbing" for on top of the chassis, but I like the idea of using tar paper or the concrete barrier strip as substitute on top of the chassis  because this is more like the original material, and also it will really flatten out if it needs to.  Wanting something that will also not hold water.

The other thing I was going to use is 3M strip caulk between the fenders and the body.  We used to use this to make circles around tail light lenses and bolts to keep water out of the trunk, and you could remove the light later without any issues.  I think this would be good as well between the hood sills and the front top of the running board aprons.  The nice thing about strip caulk is that it will protect the paint and leave a very small gap between the parts.  It won't hold water and it is easy to clean at the edge of the parts if it squeezes that far and you don't know it's there.         Hugh

      

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I like to use the window glass setting tape.  It's more expensive, but it will last a long time.  Besides noise reduction, it also wiil keep two metal pieces separated so there is less opportunity for electrolitic  corrosion. 

 

Bob Engle

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