truth

what car is this?

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Perhaps late-teens Oakland.  Clearly a car built with great care.   Look at the square pattern of the radiator core.  These were made in two different ways. Megevet in Geneva made radiator cores for a lot of the early Italian cars such as FIAT, Itala, and Isotta Fraschini  from impact-extruded square section thin tubes with expanded ends.   These were usually very heavy radiators.  Sunbeam used similar type, but likely of English manufacture because there is no Megevet brand on my 1913.  I have a Haynes radiator core which has similar square pattern, but produced by rolling or stamping brass strip about 7 thou thick. Stutz sometimes used the same type.  Some cartridge tube cores were made by casting myriads of formers of the profile in Woods metal; with copper wires in the centre.  The tubes were then deposited by electroplating; and the Woods metal was recovered for casting more by melting it out in very hot water.

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thanks for your wisdom ivan      i always learn when i read your posts     the radiators are so different as in the pic of this fiat that i bought i bet the radiator is 100 lbs plus    very strong  and very custom    i almost bought another radiator like mine as a back up but the size was off by 2 inches  but looked exactly the same       when its part of the body thats a big deal   back to origional pic   i noticed the liscence plate has 1921 which is probably the year of pic?

TR Fiat 1.jpg

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15 hours ago, 8E45E said:

I believe it is a Scripps-Booth touring.

 

Craig

I agree; note the round radiator badge.

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Could the first car pictured above with the V-shaped radiator be an early 20's Premier Touring car?

 

Looks a lot like the 1921 Premier Touring Car that my friend and I just purchased out of Wyoming.

 

The V-shaped radiator and the high beam/low beam headights look like the ones on  my car. The small "spotlights"  attached to the windshield posts are just like mine.

 

A photo of my new "baby" below. I have to find an original radiator cap. I probably need to have the v-shaped radiator evaluated; ? leaks. I heard that these radiators can be really expensive to repair/recore.

 

Any advice?

 

Tom Wallace, Dayton, OH

 

 

IMG_7645.jpg

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I would say measure the inside thread size and start searching on Ebay for the radiator cap. You can add the MotoMeter later.

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1 hour ago, tomwallace said:

Could the first car pictured above with the V-shaped radiator be an early 20's Premier Touring car?

 

Looks a lot like the 1921 Premier Touring Car that my friend and I just purchased out of Wyoming.

 

The V-shaped radiator and the high beam/low beam headights look like the ones on  my car. The small "spotlights"  attached to the windshield posts are just like mine.

 

A photo of my new "baby" below. I have to find an original radiator cap. I probably need to have the v-shaped radiator evaluated; ? leaks. I heard that these radiators can be really expensive to repair/recore.

 

Any advice?

 

Tom Wallace, Dayton, OH

 

 

IMG_7645.jpg

Nice car! Guess that ID;s the original photo, cowl lights and top quarter windows and visor all match. Bob

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The second pic is a very big Fiat. Probably a late production Type 55 built in Poughkeepsie, New York - circa 1917-18. There has been a post or two here from someone who owns one. 130mm x 170 mm for about 9.2 litres - I think - about 560 cubes.

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yes i see the similarities   is premier the name of the make?   i believe the one i pictured is a 1921  these pics were from a farm in tn   theres more    im  converting the 7x9 negatives to digital which is quite a process    the farmer who owned the 2nd car /a fiat 7 pass tourer/ was from italy and converted a cadillac into a truck that went to denver but he was an amazing car guy  yes the old radiators must be stupid expensive  guy on here is selling some  he had one like on my fiat   i passed out and got up off the floor after he told me 4900.00  it was also 2 inches shorter so i think theres alot of custom work in them and they are all alittle different?   i patched mine w high temp jb weld   it matches the drk grey aluminum  and is holding  i dont think theres many around anymore that build these radiators   i found a guy in california that said hed build mine but later backed down cause his guys couldnt handle it  you can find the cap e bay \ pre war cars  \    horsless carriage  \  you can also post "wanted"  requests       currently this ones listed 2.25 dia    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Brass-Star-radiator-cap-/253117119705?hash=item3aeef4bcd9:g:YvcAAOSwr6xZofjA&vxp=mtr   cant tell if  yours is id or od     if you find a radiator rebuilder in your travels please let us know  you have a very awesome car cant wait till mine gets like it  been working 2 yrs at it now  i think its the only 1918 7 pass fiat tourer left its a massive 9 liter 4 cyl  dual ignition  and im a carpenter  so it goes slower   but its something to do

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Pat1.jpg.b25889b5cffb4a00c1f27e802132328c.jpgIt is a Premier.  First year of this model was 1920.  They used a McCord radiator built using sheets of brass. It is a 4 inch thick core, and no one to my knoeledge can reproduce this exactly without building the dies to stamp the brass.  Check my posts in Our Cars and Restorations, 20Premier.  

Edited by 20Premier (see edit history)

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