LAS VEGAS DAVE

THE OVERDRIVE MOD BEGINS

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I believe it takes 12-15 amps to initially "fire" the solenoid but to hold overdrive the draw is only about 1 amp. My '29 Cadillac has no problems with the overdrive's power draw, although it won't fire the solenoid with the headlights on--there's just not enough power. Turn the headlights off, activate the overdrive, turn the headlights back on, and it's all good.

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

You are correct that current draw is one key to reliable operation of this electromechanical overdrive unit. Looking at the last set of pictures you posted, do you think you should apply something protective, like dielectric grease, to the electrical terminal connections? Otherwise, being exposed to the elements under your car may jeopardize your hard fought success.

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I live out here in Las Vegas Nevada, nothing corrodes here. No humidity, no snow, no salt, only the sun wrecks stuff but the wires are undeneath. I think I'll corrode before they do! Today I drove the car around town in 100 plus degree heat. The temp gage stayed between 175 and 180. I mostly drove around 45 or 50 mph but the speedometer only said 25 to 30. The engine definitely runs cooler with the overdrive. I'm loving my new buick. Tomorrow there is a car show under the trees and on the grass in Boulder City Nevada, I'm driving there in the morning. Life is good, lets see for how long.

Edited by LAS VEGAS DAVE (see edit history)

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 Hope you have an enjoyable outing. Thanks for all the great pictures, descriptions and updates.

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The car now has over a hundred miles on the new overdrive set up without problems. It's been the best thing that could be done to this car as far as making it drivable in todays world. I would recommend this to anyone that has a car similar to the 38. Some other benefits as a result of the overdrive is that the car runs cooler when its engaged than when its not, not a very big difference but it is noticeable on the gage and the engine feels as if it will last forever since around town the speedometer usually reads between 25 and 30 miles per hour even though the car is going 40 or 50.

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16 minutes ago, amphigill said:

Is Lloyd still doing this?Could I get contact info? Thanx Tom

Lloyd Young,   4915 Lithopolis Winchester Rd.   Canal Winchester, Oh  43110    Ph #614 837 7832  As far as I know Lloyd is still in business, I think he`s in his late 80s and maybe 90s since he did mine in 2013...

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We have put over one thousand trouble free miles on our overdrive, I still think it is the best modification that can be done to a 37 or 38 Buick if it is driven very much. My friend followed me on the freeway yesterday to a shop on the other side of Vegas, about fifteen miles and said we mostly did seventy miles per hour and that whole way is slightly up hill. When I got my torque tube with the overdrive fitted to it from LloydI it was a simple bolt in, all the work he did was perfect. It has never even leaked. I did the wiring and made the brackets that hold the kick out solenoid and the overdrive pull handle. I also ended up buying a brand new overdrive unit solenoid which is pricey at almost three hundred dollars. Lloyd will send you the same solenoids for free but they are old and  I tried two of them and they did not last to long, I've never had trouble with the new one. I hope you have the same experience that I had, you will be happy. 

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Your 4.88:1 ratio becomes a 3.416:1 - engine turning at 70% of prior requirement for the same road speed.

 

Lloyd did our '34-50 many years ago, as well as a couple of our other cars.

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Good news, hopefully it will get done quickly. The worst part is over since it is out and boxed and shipped already. For me the boxing and shipping was a PITA.

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I just read this thread again & realize how lucky I am to have a leave spring set up. Only had to remove u bolts on springs,( left shock links hooked to spring plate, )brake cables, rear cover, push axles in, 4 bolts on front of tube. Then bolts on center section.torsion bars at tube(2 nuts) Slid it back on springs,drop front down, slide unit FWD.&out. Walla!! 1 hr. Later done!!

Edited by amphigill (see edit history)

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picked  up the torque tube with OD. installed on mon. took a little longer to install it than remove it! Waiting on brake shoe re-line job. Also have to hook up cable & wiring. Back on road soon!!

 

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Dave, I have Lloyds overdrive in my 1938 Buick.  I'm in Florida.  Rather than build crate and ship, I pulled complete rear and put it on my Chinese trailer.  Two day ride, three days in his machine shop guys and two days back.  I have many pix of the mods and instillation.  Later converted to 12v.  Vintage auto garage has "new" solenoids.  Took mine on a 1700 mile trip  and cruised ~60-65 on the road all day.  Engine rpm 2350 @ 65 mph.  Ready to go to Wilmington  NC in April.  36-38 club member (#320).  Love to see yours there.  You need to use the original rear end.  Mine is the standard 4:44.  The final w/ OD is 3:07.  The Century 3:90 would be to low resulting ratio in the high 2's.  Not good. Most older cars had rear end ratio's in the 4:10 to 4:40's.  Best for the overdrive function.

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Jim,

 

Welcome to the AACA Discussion Forum. I look forward to receiving your registration for the 36-38 Buick Club Tour and look forward to meeting you in a few weeks here in Wilmington.

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Dave, I have a 40 series coupe and rebuilt all running gear.  I bought mine to have a driving car.  I got the last of the F series 263 cube straight 8's.  Mid year in 1953.  If you have any questions, e-mail me at. Oldbuickjim@gmail.com

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9 hours ago, Jim Nelson said:

Dave, I have a 40 series coupe and rebuilt all running gear.  I bought mine to have a driving car.  I got the last of the F series 263 cube straight 8's.  Mid year in 1953.  If you have any questions, e-mail me at. Oldbuickjim@gmail.com

 

Jim I toyed with the idea of putting a 263 in our SPECIAL but since there is only 24000 on the car and it runs like new I just couldn't justify it. If mine ever needs to come out I would make that switch as I just like the little bigger motor and the inserts. Since I'm older than dirt already I have a hunch the Buick will outlast me just as it is.

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Dave,  I got several solenoids from Lloyd.  There is now a supplier of new solenoids from Vintage Auto Garage.  I had a small problem with the older units.  Bought one of the new units.  I have pix on how I hooked up the micro switch to the clutch system.  Also how I attached the light and button with the mechanical cable.  I put a small subpannel below the dash.  To that I attached the mechanical  disconnect cable and push button and turn on button.  Lloyds electrical system works great.  The only problem was  how to make the clutch actuate the micro switch.  I made many pic of what and how I did it.  I'm a detail type guy.  History:  I built and flew three "home built" a mature built airplanes.  I flew for 50 + years until I moved over to beautiful pre war cars. My pic's answer a thousand questions.  Oldbuickjim@gmail.com.   

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Jim, I also use one of the new solenoids. I also made my own micro switch brackets and my own overdrive cable bracket and on/off lamp holder. I have well over a thousand miles on the overdrive with no problems. I had two Cessna 170 airplanes, an A model and a B model which I flew all over California and Mexico in the seventies. I never did get a license but I had a hanger in Van Nuys and a friend taught me to fly, no one ever asked to see my license. Many of us old car guys like all things mechanical. Boats, Planes, Motorcycles, hobby models preferably powered, etc. I started this post over a year ago and also have many pictures of everything I did in it as I kept posting. 

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Hi Dave,  I see there are a few of us crazies left.  I also had a 1950 Cessna 170 a and moved up to a 1951 Cessna 195 a.  Loved that bird.  I like round engines.  They sound so sweet..  Nothing like them.   22 years flying Huey's for Uncle Sam.  These Buicks are almost as much fun.  At least I can work on them.  74 is not quite old as dirt but I'm working on it.  I am glad the OD units work so well.  I am in 4 and 6 lane traffic all the time.  The OD lets me stay with traffic.  60 - 65 mph.  Actually I prefer the 6 lane limited access traveling and cruising 60 - 65.  Less hazards.  Other wise, it would be regular city traffic with lights every 1/8 to 1/4 mile or so.  We (in St Petersburg / Tampa traffic have a lot of snow birds and their stupit driving.  So they usually pull the "I gotta turn right here now ". and dash across three lanes to get some place.  No forethought or "prior planning"  duh..  Most drivers stay a respectable distance from us old cars.   I don't try to keep up with cars at a stop light.  We can not accelerate like them but I usually catch them  a bit down the street.  Still, it's a trip back in time driving these classic cars today.  My wife has a friend who saw mcoupe and mentioned how sharp it looked.  She said not bad for a car that was 4 years younger than she was..    I've promised her a ride next week.

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Jim, my favorite plane was a 195 but I never flew one or was ever in one, I just liked their look. You and I are on the same page as are many others on loving to drive the old cars. It brings back my youth. Also you have to actually DRIVE these cars. They require a bit more attention than driving a new car. I like to use the clutch, shift gears, use the overdrive, its all important and requires some skill to use correctly, its fun. Yowls have to be aware of the braking limitations and drive accordly. Driving the old car is not just a way to get from A to B its a way to have fun even if A or B is chore you would rather not do. I like the slow easy pace while driving around town and I like the smiles it puts on others faces as they wave at you or take a picture. I like the windows down and the fresh air which we never put down in our new cars, just turn on the AC. I like the fact that each ride is an adventure in that you are never sure that everything mechanical will work for the duration of the trip, unlike a new car where you never give that a second thought. I still normally drive at 60 or 65 mph even in overdrive as the car just feels like its happy and will do it all day long forever. I have had many hot rods or modified cars and installed AC, power disc brakes, bigger engine, digital gauges etc. I liked those cars BUT I pretty much just turned them into modern reliable cars and they lost their soul. I love this old car because of the lack of all the modern stuff. I'm sure many can relate. Glad to see you are enjoying yours, the coupes are beautiful.

GREAT BUICK PIC.JPG

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