Jim Nelson

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Everything posted by Jim Nelson

  1. Well, I see that this opinion on keeping our cars running in todays conditions has ruffeled some feathers. I enjoy driving my ‘38’ Buick in todays traffic and if that is what it takes to keep it safe, it’s my opinion. My Buick is not a trailer queen, I drive mine.....
  2. BTW, Only the gas gage needs protection. Change the bulbs, add the RUNTZ voltage unit to keep it working and the rest need nothing. Don’t use anything but the RUNTZ protester. There are others that are cheeper but I wouldn’t trust them. A failure in that area gets to be very expensive to fix. The amp meter is a current device, not voltage. The temp gage and oil pressure are mechanical. This is only my opinion but I’ve been there, done that.
  3. Converting to 12 volts is a issue - - I can utilize modern equipments. Your original 6 volt starter will work nicely on 12 volts. You will have a problem with the heater fan. My biggest issue was I NEEDED air conditioning here in Florida. That requires 12 volts to make that happen. The rest was just come along items. I’m modifying my newest addition to my 2 car garage. I found a 1935 series 58 Buick. Mom says if it’s full, no more cars. I am converting it to 12 volts also. It will have over drive so I can drive and keep up with traffic. Buick guys can get over drive mod’s easily from the guy who did Lloyd Young’s mod’s. I now own two of them. I drive 60 to 65 mph easily with the engine turning only 2200 to 2350 all day. My ‘38’ Buick coupe cruises 65 mph and 2350 rpm. Long trips easily - my longest was 1800 miles round trip. Ya man - - -
  4. Been there, done that...... I converted my ‘38’ to 12 volts. The horns are the issue. They will work on 12 volts - providing you don’t use them more than a few moments that they are needed. I use mine momentarily - - a couple of short beep’s works wonders. Remember, back in the mid ‘50’, the car manufacturers reduced the sound because they were very loud. So using your old horns on 12 volts has been a no problems for me. I live in a very busy part of Florida with a ton of tourists trying to get around. Drive your great old car as if your grandmother was in the front seat with you. My conversion was smooth. I got 12 volt light bulbs to replace every thing including head lights. The manufacturers did not give you enough candle power bulbs for todays needs. I’ve added ‘37’ Ford LED tail lights to supplement the low powered tail lights. E-mail me @ Oldbuickjim@gmail.com for some pix of what I did. Trust me, those LED tail lights were a life saver when I had a front tire BLOW OUT at night on the Interstate. I pulled off on to the side and the LED tail lights were very bright so I could be seen for oncoming traffic. Waited for the Road Ranger to keep the traffic away from me so I could change my tire and get on my way - - -.
  5. Do you have the small engine or big (320) engine ? If you have problems, be careful. Engine work is a deep hole. I know of a ‘36’ 320 engine that you might get reasonable. Maybe just a good head - BTW, do you belong to a Buick club ? In addition to the big BCA club ? I belong to the ‘36-38’ Buick club’. (Ad in the BCA monthly mag. ). We are drivers rather that trailer guys. Call Gene Phillips in Anderson Indiana, 765-642- 4088. He’s the guy to talk to. I joined them in 2013 and they are great. I’m a fixer ‘ doer type guy so being able to call somebody to solve a question works with me. Good technical guys when you have questions.
  6. Compression check and set the valves. I use a remote reading IR thermometer to see if any exhaust valves are leaking when running. That will show you which valve / cylinder is a problem. That tool will also show you if there is any cool spots on the block where junk is stopping water from circulating . The Shell Rotella T4 15W40 for DIESEL engines is available from Walmart at the best prices. Other oil prices in other places are more expensive. Very good on the new radiator. The IR thermometer will also show you if there is any big temps changes around the surface of the rad. I’m told that you should see about a 25 degree temp difference from the inlet vs outlet water. I use my Harbor Freight store for tools you can use occasionally and not spend a bundle.
  7. I like coupe’s. Your ‘36’ looks very nice. How does it run ? Oil pressure, water temps after running for 15 or more minutes and then ideling for 5 min. That will tell you the condition of the bearings and cooling system. What oil are you using. Our club recommends 15W40 Shell Rotella T4 Diesel. This has the necessary ZDDP levels for our old cars. Just some thoughts on what we do to keep them running strong. If you are in the frost free part of the country, and you are having minor water temp’s issue, using a distilled water with an additive for anti-corrosion and lubrications (water pump) will help. Here in Florida, I use every thing I can to keep from overheating. Way to much fun .....
  8. Looking at your engine, I see the color of your fender. It looks just like my 35-58 Vicky. Its called Pony Brown and my "yellowish color is called Taffy Tan. The Fender is now "Ditz-Lac intermix formula. IM color # IM 1073 Yedaz Tan. If your body is the same as mine, let me know. I got this from AutoColorLibrary www.tcpglobal.com I haven't needed to get a small quantity of the brown but I will. "tcpglobal" is located in california. They specialize in 'old car colors' My other color is one I will need to match by I think it is to far gone. Iwill have to take it back to the original primer ? and redo it. Its the last thing I do. Pretty is the last thing I do. Mechanicals first so I have a dependable driver.
  9. Been there, done that. I'm an old pilot who was retired early ( ? ) do to a stroke. Used the old ? 100 octane gas when possible in the summer time. Even that has become very expensive and the airport doesn't like you buying gas and taking it home in 5 gal containers. po po --- I can get ethanol free gas now from my local Wa Wa gas station. IT costs the same as Diesel so I don't mind the bump. My Buick likes the ethanol free gas. Regular 'crap gas' from the gov does not like my old Buick. It tolerates it for a bit but I go back to the real gas as soon as I can.
  10. Looking at your engine, I see the color of your fender. It looks just like my 35-58 Vicky. Its called Pony Brown and my "yellowish color is called Taffy Tan. The Fender is now "Ditz-Lac intermix formula. IM color # IM 1073 Yedaz Tan. If your body is the same as mine, let me know. I got this from AutoColorLibrary www.tcpglobal.com I haven't needed to get a small quantity of the brown but I will. "tcpglobal" is located in california. They specialize in 'old car colors' My other color is one I will need to match by I think it is to far gone. Iwill have to take it back to the original primer ? and redo it. Its the last thing I do. Pretty is the last thing I do. Mechanicals first so I have a dependable driver.
  11. Ask and you will receive !. The wisdom of many nut cases like ours - - -
  12. BTW, I would keep the fuel line away from the exhaust system. You WILL have vapor lock issues. If you are using the original ? 233 CI engine, the fuel pump is on the pax. side close to the back. My orig. fuel line went rearward from my MARVEL carb and then under the engine and then to the fuel pump. The later small engines (248) engines, with the down draft carb’s , had the fuel line go forward around the valve cover and then down to the more forward mounted fuel pump. I covered the fuel line with some insulation to keep the fuel temps down. Being an old aircraft builder, we had a fiberglass/urethane? cover for fuel lines. Vapor lock is not something wanted while flying
  13. Check with Dave Tacheny. He is a good Buick parts guy. (1-763-427-3460, 4-6 pm, Central). If you are using a AA - 1 (for the small engine ). (I have a 35-50 series vicky). Get a standard air cleaner. If you get the heavy duty unit, it is of lower profile. I’m using the heavy duty filter cause Florida has higher dust / sand issue. My engine was bad so I exchanged it with a (spare) 248 that I had laying around. Separate issue. Down the road in front of you. - - -
  14. Check my e-mail. It’s a late model housing with that mounting bracket. Not a good design. With the weight hanging on that bracket it DOES break the casting. Oil goes in the upper fitting and out the bottom fitting. Definitly add a support to take the weight of the housing and oil.
  15. #7 is most likely the manual throttle. My ‘37’. and my ‘38’ have this device. #5 is probably the headlight switch. The #6 is usable for auxiliary driving lights or possibly the heater fan control. Heaters were an option on most of them... Or, #3 was for the heater control. Leaving the aux. switch below the dash for the driving lights. Check with Rhode Island Wire co. to see how the original wiring was set up. That would be my first choice. I’ve used them on two of my cars. They are VERY good. Well worth the price to have it correctly. Cheep is never the best price.
  16. This color groupe is a standard color for the '35' 58 series. The car was available in two colors in '35'. This one and a Forest green.
  17. I lost the pix of you bring it home. You said it had a two tone paint on the '36' and some one said it was not standard. I have a '35' 50 series 'Vicky" with the two tone paint. It is pony Brown and Fraizer Lambs wool tan. Attached is my '35' with those colors. I like the colors.
  18. I have a 1935 and the reflecter is strange. It’s not highly polished like my ‘38’. It’s a rough aluminum textured finish. It has the standard mounted head light - three holes and it had the 32w/32w bulb. It is about 8” in diameter. The front glass is good and I have a spare set. I would like a good reflecter to give me decent illumination.
  19. Yup, Having a heater to keep the chill off helps. Here in Florida, it gets nippy around Christmas thru mid Feb. but my heater does what ever it can. Then again, I have a 1938 coupe. I needed a/c to survive the summer. I have rebuilt the running gear to the point where I’ve taken trips as long as 1800 miles round trip. Enjoy your unique 1939 rag top as it will surely turn many heads. It’s a beauty....
  20. I like the wire wheels I found. The price was very good. I think the guy I bought them from thought they were for the 35-50 series that Buick had. All Buicks had 16” wheels - not 17”. Finding 17” tires to fit the rims and look good like the wide whitewall from the late thirties was a problem. 17” tires are a group with few options. Lots of ‘wide’ tires but few in the 195, 205, 215 sizes. Since I need to buy a new set of tires, I think I will go the 17” radial size. I’ll keep one of my older tires as my spare which is a 16” wheel and rim. It will still bolt on so if I need a spare, I’ll use it. It will fit within my metal tire cover. No, I will not use radial tubes as Coker Tire wants you to. I have been using regular Diamond Back Classic tire brand on my ‘38’ coupe for over three years. They work fine....
  21. Well, I have a set of 6 . I’ll check to see if they are welded on both ends. I may just use them on my 50 series Buick. Buick used 16” wheels on all their cars. My artillery wheels on my Buick are in pretty good shape. Thanks for the info.
  22. Rare Parts in California had a great replacement. A better design than the original design....
  23. I have a set (6 ) wire wheels that are for 17” tires. The mounting is for 5 - 5-1/2” mounting. Is this for Fords ? They are in very good shape. (they may be power coated ) Am I correct that this wheel is for Ford cars ? E-mail me @. Oldbuickjim@gmail.com .
  24. I have a 1935-50 Buick. When I bought it I knew it needed shocks front and back. My front shocks are Delco-Lovejoy knee action units that are a bit wierd. Because of that, mine were ~$450 each. The rear units are single arm units and ran about $275 each. Not cheep but they will last beyond my lifetime. Plus I’m sure the prior owners never kept the shock fully charged. Many of our old cars had very little maintenance over their life time. When was the last time your rear axel outboard bearings were regreased or replaced as needed ? A small pain to open them up and check the lube in there. I’ve done 4 of them. Three were tolerable, only in condition. Needed TLC and new grease to make them last another year or two. One was trashed and was about to cause serious problems. I always open them up and replace the bearings and grease seals. That done, their good enough now for another 40 to 60,000 miles.
  25. I had the same problem with my ‘35’. I sent my key that was operating my trunk locks to a guy “Jesser” key guy in Ohio. He is listed in Hemmings and he did a complete match. He was reasonable and I bought 2. Spares are so nice - -