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sourcing material 1955 Buick


Guest Jammin
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Guest Jammin

Does anyone know where I can find the brushed metal material surrounding the instrument cluster and extending to both doors on the dash of a 1955 Buick Roadmaster??? It appears to be plastic but I am not sure. Any ideas?? Some of mine needs replacing.

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Does anyone know where I can find the brushed metal material surrounding the instrument cluster and extending to both doors on the dash of a 1955 Buick Roadmaster??? It appears to be plastic but I am not sure. Any ideas?? Some of mine needs replacing.

It's stainless steel. "Engine turned" is the term my Dad called the treatment.

EDIT Actually I've now learned that is aluminum

Edited by bhambulldog
aluminum (see edit history)
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55 Century's trim material is aluminum. I suspect Roadies would be also. Mike (Buick5563) can possibly supply the parts for a Century but for a Roadie you are doomed to having your parts re-engine turned..............Bob

Yep. That's why I haven't chimed in. I have had the small series reproduced. If somebody wants to send me a complete set of big series trim, I can see what I can do. Mr. Seybold does do engine turning on your original pieces and does a fantastic job, but charges accordingly.

The other question that I had was whether he was talking about the door panel material which (if I remember correctly) is a different pattern (not engine turned).

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Since my last post I have done some experimenting, and may have come up with a solution for small areas where the engine turning is worn away. 1. On the piece lay up a grid centering the swirl circles in pencil. 2. Set up your drill press to index horizontally lining up with line#1 on the pencil grid. 3. Take a standard #2 pencil and center it in your drill press chuck, eraser side facing material face. 4.put a very small amount of tooth paste on the aluminum. 5. Put the drill press on a medium/slow speed and press the pencil eraser down onto the toothpaste/aluminum/grid spot on the piece. 6.it is slow and takes a while to develop the right amount of pressure/technique, but to remediate a small area it work fairly well. Needless to say. Practice and test this method on the back of the piece to perfect your technique and amount of paste and pressure to get the right look.

Edited by Jammin (see edit history)
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