Jump to content

6 Volt North East Key Coil


Recommended Posts

Here is the next generation of keys, I do not know where I came across this key, clearly to me now it is for a bit of an earlier car than my own 126,124,128,129,140,141,2249,2251,2252 and D.B

Most of these were 6 cyl vehicles like mine but ignition coil assy have their differences

Clearly marked DB just like the book says an original would

post-48869-143141738393_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

And then my own series of car and here is where I am still at a loss, I am fairly sure it is the original key at this point. Ignition not screwed with, correct make of key, IM # will match the lock cylinder so need to find the correlation between IM and JL.

Incidentally pictured below is an original spare tire lock and spare tire lock cylinder assy with correct matching original key, the key on the right ( notice the shape of the head, try to find one of those :) )

Both cylinders are marked JL on the outside with the key code. Interesting.

I know that B.S supplied these lock cylinders as can be seen by this B.S data sheet.

Thats all I have 4 now but I have looked again thru my books and I am un-able to find anything else at this point that has anything specifically to do with truck keys/locks ect.

post-48869-143141738421_thumb.jpg

post-48869-143141738444_thumb.jpg

post-48869-143141738447_thumb.jpg

post-48869-14314173845_thumb.jpg

Edited by 1930 (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Got Vol 3 today.

Just wanted to point out the similarities in the JLs and IMs I've found.

Notice they both use the same blanks. 42107 and 9119. Also, notice the JL 750-1000 series is listed in Vol 2 :mad:

Heres the JL page if it helps. Copyright date 1977 lol. You nailed it

post-69994-143141740419_thumb.jpg

Edited by 30DodgePanel (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

I received this message in response to JL and IM .......JL is a keyway identifier, it refers to the slot pattern in the side of the key, so yes, it's going to be the same on all blanks that actully fit into the lock slot.

I have joined a key sumpthin or other forum and have asked for more clarification concerning JL and IM nomenclatures, so far I have had one completely useless response!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just wanted to point out the similarities in the JLs and IMs I've found.

Notice they both use the same blanks. 42107 and 9119. Also, notice the JL 750-1000 series is listed in Vol 2 :mad:

Heres the JL page if it helps.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]176619[/ATTACH]

This is good info, it does help and I think we are nearing a conclusion

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have joined a key sumpthin or other forum and have asked for more clarification concerning JL and IM nomenclatures, so far I have had one completely useless response!

Link to the discussion ? I'd like to see how they explained it along with your conclusion. I'll wait till after you conclude to read it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are the absolute correct original keys for the ignition of a DD-6 and a DC-8, you will see both of these cars listed within that booklet I keep referencing that I have shown the page of.

I have asked for clarification from the owner just what the cylinders are marked but have had no response, I will continue to pursue that answer.

Ok so we are seeing some original keys/ignition cylinders that are being marked IM but according to book are supposed to be marked JL and we are seeing some original key lock cylinders that are being marked JL just as the book mentions.

post-48869-143141740438_thumb.jpg

post-48869-143141740454_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
Here are the absolute correct original keys for the ignition of a DD-6 and a DC-8, you will see both of these cars listed within that booklet I keep referencing that I have shown the page of.

I have asked for clarification from the owner just what the cylinders are marked but have had no response, I will continue to pursue that answer.

Ok so we are seeing some original keys/ignition cylinders that are being marked IM but according to book are supposed to be marked JL and we are seeing some original key lock cylinders that are being marked JL just as the book mentions.

Yep

Ok so that blank stock or part number according to the book is 76575 correct ?

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have time today will you look and see if you can find a listing for instance of saay the C 437 on this other key, clearly it is a different blank when I look at it closely and compare it too the IM blank, ( although coincidentally it does fit into the DA Dodge ignition cylinder ) I am starting to see clearer that yes these JL, IM, and I am guessing the Cs for instance all are representing the different blanks that the locksmiths would be using for the key cuts and although you may already be waay ahead of me on this and do not have any doubt on this I am still myself looking for final clarification.

post-48869-143141740696_thumb.jpg

Edited by 1930 (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

C437 is listed as a BASCO with a blank stock # of 42164 so the blank is different than the 42107. For further information Vol 2 is needed :mad:

C50-99 is 42107

C250-499 is 42164

C500-699 is 42107

All B&S

I did order some more auto key literature but I'll to wait till it comes to see what all it describes.

Edited by 30DodgePanel (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
BTW , just curious, what are the types of coils used for the JLs in the DD and DC car you mentioned also ?

EDIT : And what year are the cars ?

These would be Delco coils, Delco took over N.E. in late 29

DD and DC are 30 and 31 series cars

Link to post
Share on other sites
C437 is listed as a BASCO with a blank stock # of 42164 so the blank is different than the 42107. For further information Vol 2 is needed :mad:

C50-99 is 42107

C250-499 is 42164

C500-699 is 42107

All B&S

I did order some more auto key literature but I'll to wait till it comes to see what all it describes.

No problem, at this point I think it is clear/unquestionable that the IM, JL, Cs ect ect are keyway identifiers. I am going to put that to rest now, no more clarity is need for that for me. Thanks

Link to post
Share on other sites

Some company history:

Briggs & Stratton began in 1908 as a partnership between Stephen F. Briggs and Harold M. Stratton. Stephen Briggs had recently graduated from South Dakota State College with a degree in electrical engineering and was already an accomplished inventor. Harold Stratton earned a degree in business from the Milwaukee Business College and had become a partner in his uncle's grain trading company. Briggs wanted to start a business to manufacture an engine that he had designed while in college. Stratton was always interested in new investments. Together they ventured into the new field of automobile manufacturing.

Their first project was the development of an innovative six-cylinder, two-cycle automobile engine of Briggs' design. When the initial plan proved too costly, the partners decided to assemble cars from parts manufactured elsewhere. The second venture culminated in an automobile called the Superior. Although the Superior ran well, it too proved unprofitable. But the entrepreneurs still saw opportunities in the young automotive industry and refused to give up. Henry Ford had just introduced the Model T and his innovative method of mass production made automobiles affordable to a huge market of average Americans for the first time. While Stephen Briggs and Harold Stratton's initial business ventures were unsuccessful, they learned from the experience and eventually recognized that their opportunity lay in the market for specialty parts for automobiles. Hoping to profit from this burgeoning market, the partners went back to the drawing board and began selling locks, ignition switches and other electrical specialty parts. Finally, the struggling company had found its niche. After a short period, the partnership was deemed successful enough to incorporate. The Briggs & Stratton Company was incorporated on June 2, 1910 with Stephen Briggs listed as president and Harold Stratton listed as Vice President.

Early on, the company displayed a talent for quickly adapting to changing market conditions. Over the following decades, the company established a long tradition of invention and innovation, investing in many new market opportunities and selling such diverse products as washing machine engines, radios and refrigerators. Eventually Briggs & Stratton established two solid businesses related to their early efforts that continue to this day: automobile locks and small engines.

DEVELOPMENT OF THE AUTOMOTIVE COMPONENTS BUSINESS

In the early twenties, Briggs & Stratton's automotive component product line-up successfully expanded from relatively simple switch devices to include more complex cylinder locks. The newer cylinder locks could be used in various access areas on the automobile. Primarily used to lock the vehicle's doors, they could also secure the car's ignition, transmission, radio and spare tire. At that time it was common for numerous locks to be used on a single car. By the mid-twenties, cylinder locks became the company's number one product.

Since each lock required a separate key, the simple task of getting into a car and starting it up could be overwhelming to the owner. As a solution, Briggs & Stratton offered a system that could be installed on any new car manufactured with its locks. For a 75-cent fee, the owner could streamline his key chain by ordering a master key that could open every lock on the car. Many owners took advantage of this opportunity to streamline their hefty key chain.

The locks produced at Briggs & Stratton at this time were made from machined brass lock cylinders purchased from an outside company. The cylinders were quite expensive and not always readily available, impacting the company's ability to meet market demand. Intrigued with the emergence of zinc die-casting, Stephen Briggs began to investigate the process to produce his own lock cylinders. Later that year, Briggs & Stratton began this innovative method of lock cylinder production. From that point on, zinc die-casting became the preferred construction for automotive locks because of its relatively low cost, durability and the ability to form intricate shapes needed for a lock mechanism. Virtually every car produced in the world utilizes zinc lock cylinders, a fitting testament to Stephen Briggs' foresight.

In the mid-1920's, the company introduced a line of automotive products referred to as "hardware." This product line included door handles, inside door levers, door knobs, ornamental plates and hinged covers for keyholes. Briggs & Stratton promoted these items as "Automobile Body Hardware of Distinctive Character." During this time, they also created an early brand name "Basco" (Briggs & Stratton Company) that was prominently displayed on all products, advertisements and literature.

FOCUS ON LOCKS AND ENGINES

In 1929, Briggs & Stratton shipped more than 11 million locks to approximately 130 manufacturers, including General Motors, Ford, Chrysler and the Dodge Brothers. This customer base represented about 75% of the automotive industry at that time, and two-thirds of automotive lock production nationwide. In that year, 70% of Briggs & Stratton's business was in the manufacture and sale of locks. By 1930, Briggs & Stratton could lay claim to being the largest manufacturer of automobile locks in the world. As the lock cylinder business grew, electrical specialties and other Basco products became less important and were eventually phased out completely.

Briggs & Stratton was also building a variety of small engines at this time, derived from a motor wheel product purchased by the company in 1919. Briggs & Stratton engines were used in a variety of products, generators, pumps, lawn mowers and garden cultivating equipment, but washing machines were the most popular use for Briggs & Stratton engines in the 1930's. By the time World War II broke out, the company's sales were split evenly between small engines and automotive locks.

THE WORLD IN TRANSITION

As with the rest of the world, things were never the same at Briggs & Stratton after World War II. Auto manufacturing declined precipitously during the war due to the conversion of most of the country's manufacturing base towards support of the war effort. Nearly all of Briggs' production capacity for automobile related products was temporarily converted to production of bomb fuses, magnetos for aircraft engines, ignition switches for airplanes and switches for electrically triggered aircraft guns. Engine production was maintained at Briggs, but most of the output went to the various military branches for generators, pumps, compressors, ventilating fans and other miscellaneous applications.

ENGINES TAKE OVER, BUT LOCKS KEEP ROLLING ALONG

By the late 1940s, Briggs & Stratton was one of the largest manufacturers of small gasoline engines for home and farm equipment. After World War II, it set out to capture an increased share of the growing market for lawn and garden equipment brought on by the post-war boom. It ultimately achieved this goal, with the Briggs & Stratton name becoming almost synonymous with "lawn mower."

Although engines became Briggs & Stratton's core business following World War II, that didn't stop the Automotive Division, as the lock business began to be called, from making important advancements in the design of automotive locks. Leading auto lock engineering during this post-war period was Vice President, Edward Jacobi. Jacobi was a very prolific and ingenious inventor/engineer and was personally responsible for over 225 patents granted to Briggs & Stratton over his 53-year career, many of which were related to the lock business. Due to his standing in the industry, he became known as "Mr. Lock" throughout the auto industry, further enhancing the company's reputation for invention and innovation.

Two of Jacobi's more significant patented inventions related to locks were developed in the 1940's. The first was the unit shutter, used to protect the inner workings of exterior mounted locks from contamination. The shutter, which significantly reduces the amount of water, dirt and other air or road-borne contaminants from impairing the function of the lock, has been copied over the years by almost every lock manufacturer around the world. A second significant invention during this period was the side-bar lock. This development greatly increased the pick resistance of a lock, and thus increased the vehicle's security protection. This design was initially used exclusively by the General Motors Corporation in the 1950's, but was later adopted by American Motors and Ford Motor Company.

While Briggs & Stratton continued to supply locks and keys to the automotive industry, most of its resources were put into the growth of the engine side of the business. A series of all aluminum engines introduced in the mid-1950's became the industry standard for lawn and garden equipment, and the engine side of the business took off.

SERVICE AND AFTERMARKET

In the early 1900's, as the automobile became more popular across the United States, the need for servicing grew. Out of necessity, owners performed most of their own repair work. But many owners were unable to deal with problems related to carburetors and magnetos. They needed help from people with expertise in these components.

In an attempt to meet this need, a number of automotive manufacturers helped establish independent service centers to handle the repair of carburetors and magnetos. As the industry grew, a large number of these organizations developed across the United States. In the mid twenties, Briggs & Stratton selected a group of these service centers to form the Basco Distributors and Central Service Network. Their mission was to support Basco automotive products in the field with parts and service. As the Briggs' engine product line grew, it was only natural that the company utilize this automotive-oriented network for the repair of Briggs & Stratton engines, and the distribution of engine service parts.

To complement auto lock service and sales, Briggs & Stratton developed a variety of accessories. Several key-cutting tools were developed for service centers and distributors, as well as key depth decoders, key code books, coding tools and various specialized tools for servicing the locks. In the late thirties, the company introduced the Universal Automotive Key Cutting Machine, a device developed to accurately cut keys for locks made not only by Briggs & Stratton, but other lock companies as well.

The automotive orientation of the service network served the company throughout the 1930's, 1940's and into the 1950's. During this period, the auto manufacturers shifted their support from independent service centers to the establishment of service departments within their own franchised dealers. Briggs continued to use its service network to provide replacement parts for its automotive product line and, as the years went on, it relied on distributor or service organizations that maintained an active automotive orientation. The company also continued to provide products to the OEM service parts operations and their automotive dealer networks.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I would not assume that the car keys were all round and the trucks were hex shaped, as I mentioned I am going to guess that if at any point D.B switched manuf. of lock cylinders from Basco to maybe Yale than the key head shapes may have changed. Maybe there are other possibilities that the shape of the key head would have changed.

I am only guessing that there was a change in manuf. of the lock cylinders based on the auto parts book indicating a later and earlier coil assy, maybe the change had nothing to do with the key, maybe it was something internal that we could not see. Maybe they used Basco only exclusively throughout their run. Lots of maybes.

If I were you and I just had to have an answer I would start contact other truck owners within the club and ask their take on it. What keys they have found to be correct and original.

Below is a page ( cop is all that I seem to have ) of your ignition col/lock assy and it shows the hex head key dangling from it.

Unfortunately there are errors within the page, ( again a later book, maybe from the later 30s or 40s I do not know ) as it shows coil # 5022324 being used on cars 27-30 and we know that is incorrect, this coil was used for sure 28 Victory and maybe 27/28 Standard six cars but not the 29/30 autos.

They are showing your 5023130 used only on D.B trucks 29/30 only, they also show 5023640 which in my opinion is the same unit ( same price ) but with no indication of its use unless we would believe Packard 1932.

I am pretty sure that by 32 the coils were a separate unit.

My 1929 "E"series DB trucks do not have a key\coil combination.

The coil could be the 5022636 model and it is mounted on the firewall. The key switch is on the dash.

These are both DA-6 engines.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My 1929 "E"series DB trucks do not have a key\coil combination.

The coil could be the 5022636 model and it is mounted on the firewall. The key switch is on the dash.

These are both DA-6 engines.

Thats right, the dash scan clearly shows #11 as an "ignition lock" . Interesting....

Stakeside, can you post a closeup pic of that when you get time ? A pic of the coil and the rad shutter lever on the left if you could also.

To me, that just screams 28 carryover in the E series, but I'm still just trying to grasp it all.

Jason,

yes I agree with your conclusions on the JL, IM and C's as being keyway identifiers, just makes sense but I'm still gonna pursue it in another direction.

As for the part number of 76575 - I'm not going anywhere with it yet, just curious to see what numbers align with others. So far, some match, some dont' but why ? I mean the DBs and the JLs match according to that book your referencing (just another key way verbage ?) but yet the Reeds refers to that same stock as 9119 for the JL number you gave. Then , some JLs and IMs stock numbers match. I guess I'm just getting my wires crossed at this point thinking there is more to it but maybe it's just that simple.

As for the Coils -

I was just curious to see if the IMs had North East and the JLs and others carried a Delco or one of the United lineups. Just simply trying to check every stone to make sure nothing is hiding.

I am curious what that JL round key goes to ? trunk, door ???

Edited by 30DodgePanel (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
Thats right, the dash scan clearly shows #11 as an "ignition lock" . Interesting....

Stakeside, can you post a closeup pic of that when you get time ? A pic of the coil and the rad shutter lever on the left if you could also.

To me, that just screams 28 carryover in the E series, but I'm still just trying to grasp it all.

Jason,

yes I agree with your conclusions on the JL, IM and C's as being keyway identifiers, just makes sense but I'm still gonna pursue it in another direction.

As for the part number of 76575 - I'm not going anywhere with it yet, just curious to see what numbers align with others. So far, some match, some dont' but why ? I mean the DBs and the JLs match according to that book your referencing (just another key way verbage ?) but yet the Reeds refers to that same stock as 9119 for the JL number you gave. Then , some JLs and IMs stock numbers match. I guess I'm just getting my wires crossed at this point thinking there is more to it but maybe it's just that simple.

As for the Coils -

I was just curious to see if the IMs had North East and the JLs and others carried a Delco or one of the United lineups. Just simply trying to check every stone to make sure nothing is hiding.

I am curious what that JL round key goes to ? trunk, door ???

I would try and look into the 76575 next if it were me.

I am confused on this...........I mean the DBs and the JLs..........do you mean IM and JLs

I am not sure what JL round key you are referring too, do you mean the the C round key?

At this point unless something new or big pops up I am at the conclusion that the 33 parts book page I showed just omitted mentioning IM or they felt ( once again ) that it was not important enough to add confusion to their text by adding IM ( for the DA coils ) because of the fact that IM and JL used the very same key blank. ( by the time the 33 book and the mentioned 32 book your friend has were printed )

We know they used the same key blank by the later printed Reed books you have acquired, unfortunately the Reed books are showing the incorrect key head in my opinion because again it was unimportant, maybe the hex heads became more costly or better yet ( as you will notice if you read the B.S history page I copied and pasted ) the hex heads were done away with because drivers back then were confused which key went where, they did not like carrying so many keys with different style heads ect ect.

I think that is going to be the explanation I am going to go with for the time being, hex heads were phased out/replaced because the ( head ) cut required a more complicated die. They were already using a round head on the doors so for replacements they went with a round head on the ignition lock cylinder as well. That is why the Reed book is showing a round.

At least we know now that is hex head original.

Replacements round head.

And we can come up with a plausible explanation on what may have happened over the years.

I have too move onto something else now, will keep my eyes open for any new up-dates though. Thanks, this has been much fun.

Edited by 1930 (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
I have the complete set of Reed Code books on Microfisch if someone is interested in them.

Hi Platt, thanks for the offer.

At this point I know it may not make much of a difference but I'd like to have vol's 2 & 4 now just to complete the first of the series and to follow up with the IM and JLs we've been discussing so I have it in relation to some other literature that's coming soon.

Thanks,

Dave

Link to post
Share on other sites
I would try and look into the 76575 next if it were me.

I am confused on this...........I mean the DBs and the JLs..........do you mean IM and JLs

I am not sure what JL round key you are referring too, do you mean the the C round key?

.

Sorry for the confusion Jason. I was referring to the DBs and JLs listed in the book you scanned. I see what you mean the IMs and JLs were the same thats why it was listed as JL and DB only (no IM mentioned). Just got my wires crossed...

And yes, I was referring to the round C 437 in post 132. I'm guessing that is a door key ?

I get everything else and understand why you have came to that conclusion. My questions have been answered in partial, but now I'm looking for the documentation that confirms it (years, makers, types of vehicles, and other keys like Clums). Once I locate it I'll make a final post with scans for anyone who is interested.

Don't want to speak to soon (especially after my Reeds book experience) but I may be onto some more concrete info with photos of keys, years and vehicle makes that I hope will validate it all. Looking into the Clums and other key manufacturers as well trying to secure any documentation that is relevant. All the literature I'm looking at is copies but it is of the pre 32 era. I'm in contact with someone on the west coast that is in no rush but is an avid key collector who has many different books at his disposal. If it all turns out I'll post where you can order copies if you would like.

Almost there.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I have the complete set of Reed Code books on Microfisch if someone is interested in them.

I would like a copy, are they for sale or are you offering to copy them and hand them out or where do you stand with them?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Sorry for the confusion Jason. I was referring to the DBs and JLs listed in the book you scanned. I see what you mean the IMs and JLs were the same thats why it was listed as JL and DB only (no IM mentioned). Just got my wires crossed...

And yes, I was referring to the round C 437 in post 132. I'm guessing that is a door key ?

I get everything else and understand why you have came to that conclusion. My questions have been answered in partial, but now I'm looking for the documentation that confirms it (years, makers, types of vehicles, and other keys like Clums). Once I locate it I'll make a final post with scans for anyone who is interested.

Don't want to speak to soon (especially after my Reeds book experience) but I may be onto some more concrete info with photos of keys, years and vehicle makes that I hope will validate it all. Looking into the Clums and other key manufacturers as well trying to secure any documentation that is relevant. All the literature I'm looking at is copies but it is of the pre 32 era. I'm in contact with someone on the west coast that is in no rush but is an avid key collector who has many different books at his disposal. If it all turns out I'll post where you can order copies if you would like.

Almost there.

Oh I see, my mistake ( DB and JL )

C round key is door, I am wondering if it is original, I havent a clue, I went thru everything I had the other day is search of even the smallest scrap of evidence concerning door keys and came up with nothing, zero, zilch.

I would like a complete scan of the reed books you have, I do not know what you paid but maybe I can help supplement the cost a bit, I do not know what you would need for your time but if they are avail. and I can afford them than let me know.

Maybe you would be willing to send them to me so I can copy them and return them if you have no time, several people here have let me do this and would vouch for me if necessary.

I would ( I still may myself ) look at 76575, find out what other makes match up, I know you do not have access to a ton of parts books so again I may go ahead and look into this myself, once a list is compiled than it would be time to start contacting owners of the various cars and get their take on things.

When I started out with all the Dodge stuff this is exactly how I did it, I wrote letters, picked up the phone and sent some e-mails. Just something to think about.

Let me know on the books. No hurry, no pressure, no problem either way

Edited by 1930 (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites
Thats right, the dash scan clearly shows #11 as an "ignition lock" . Interesting....

Stakeside, can you post a closeup pic of that when you get time ? A pic of the coil and the rad shutter lever on the left if you could also.

To me, that just screams 28 carryover in the E series, but I'm still just trying to grasp it all.

There is not much to the key switch. It located to the right of the steering wheel. It is the nickel plated ring.

I can not locate the interior assembly. I have it somewhere.

Note the coil mounted on the firewall. It is a NorthEast. Also note all the wires were steel wire wrapped.

The MotoGrad lever is to the left of the steering wheel

post-71470-143141742681_thumb.jpg

post-71470-143141742674_thumb.jpg

post-71470-143141742685_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Stakeside,

yeah, a pic of that interior assembly would be helpful when you get a chance. Or maybe someone could post one from another truck ?

You know ?,,,

Now Jason's gonna wanna see a close up of the lever to the left of the steering wheel since you posted that....Better figure out the macro setting on your camera, we're all gonna want to see more now ;).

176972d1360197699-6-volt-north-east-key-coil-dscf1320.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
Stakeside,

yeah, a pic of that interior assembly would be helpful when you get a chance. Or maybe someone could post one from another truck ?

You know ?,,,

Now Jason's gonna wanna see a close up of the lever to the left of the steering wheel since you posted that....Better figure out the macro setting on your camera, we're all gonna want to see more now ;).

I had a better picture and it say"Moto Gard". This operates the shutters on the radiator.

post-71470-143141742779_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
I had a better picture and it say"Moto Gard". This operates the shutters on the radiator.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]177003[/ATTACH]

Thats what I was asking to see several posts back, thanks for that, that answers alot of questions, curious though why you did not put this back in your truck, from the looks of this thing it has cool factor written all over it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Thats what I was asking to see several posts back, thanks for that, that answers alot of questions, curious though why you did not put this back in your truck, from the looks of this thing it has cool factor written all over it.

This is an extra dash section. I just used it to show locations.

Sad to say this Moto Gard lever is not functional. The pot metal back supports were damaged, but it still will look good in my dash.

Link to post
Share on other sites
drwatson posted this on another thread.

175492d1359649138-can-anyone-identify-6volt-key-coil-final-keys.jpg

Can you give me the link to the thread you found this on, have you contacted the poster, maybe asked from where the material came from?

I would like to see if he would share a bit more. Thanks

Link to post
Share on other sites

Heres another source that may be of interest to some, it's a PDF file showing the reprints that he has available. I have a few catalogues ordered and on the way still, I ordered the B&S 1, and 2 as well as the Clum catalogue. I'm curious to see if the B&S catalogue that I've ordered shows or duplicates the above information that drwatson provided.

This is the kind of documentation I was looking for if it proves out.

http://wclca.net/documents/don_stewart_books.pdf

Edited by 30DodgePanel (see edit history)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...