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1944 Ford Truck Model 49T


Ryan5O

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Hello everyone. This is my first post and Im looking for some help. My Grandparents are in possession of a 1944 Ford model 49T. They purchased the vehicle many years ago to be used as a grain truck on the family farm. It’s still in working condition and in great shape. I’m not a classic car collector or a salesperson. I have no idea of the value of the truck, if any. They intend to sell the vehicle. Any suggestions or advice you may have would be greatly appreciated. I’ve attached a few pictures. As soon as the weather clears up, they’ll pull it out of the shop and take some better shots. Thanks in Advance. Ryan

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Just got some more pictures. So am I naive to think that the truck would be valued more, considering its a WW2 era civilian vehicle? So far, it seems that its value is no greater than the pre or post war trucks. I spoke with the insurance company yesterday and they're using the same method. Im a little bumned :( The milleage in the pic is actual. Considering the current status of the economy, is it realistic to believe it would sell on the higher end?

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I would not expect it to sell on the high end. Blame the economy. It is a beautiful and well preserved truck and in a condition that one is not likely to see in a utililitarian vehicle like that. Rare as it may be, rarity does not always equal big bucks. You may have seen it as your retirement fund, but it just isn't going to happen.

A guy that I worked with has a 37 1 1/2 ton flatbed. Typical used up old truck, rotting along side of his garage, semi covered with ragged old blue tarps. Jay Leno calls him once a month and offers him $175,000 for it, but he's holding out for the quarter of million that he knows that it's really worth. After all, it's the only one left in the world. He knows because he went through all of the DMV records.

At least you're not living in a world of make believe....I hope

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ryan ,

that is what is known as a jailbar model and it is usualy worth a lot more than other models , try googling , value ford jailbar truck , as others have said it wont be your retirement fund , but it is worth more , being a jail bar.

Rex

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There's a big dropoff in value between the 40-41 Ford trucks and the 42-47s. There is also a big dropoff between 1/2 ton and larger. I'm sure you know this. The truck is in great condition but I think it would brig more money if it was military .Like anything you have to find that elusive"right person". It's never easy but I hope you do.

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The truck is in great condition but I think it would bring more money if it was military.

No Dave, I believe you're incorrect. If this truck was military it would've had the data plates on it, and it would've left the factory with tow hooks coming through the front grill piece below the headlights and above the front bumper. That grill piece would've been factory stamped to accomodate for the holes for the tow hooks.

We have a '42 Ford / American LaFrance fire truck. The truck is nice, but with all the money that we've put in it, the truck would be worth more as a farm truck (which is what you have). I personally think that if the truck had the factory Ford stake rack with stakes it would be worth the most for that model truck and wheelbase.

In either case, it's a nice looking truck. It's a shame you have to part with it.

One question.....

Does that have the Ford emblems in the side of the hood, or is the Ford script stamped into the metal?? I know the '42's & 43's had the emblems, but I haven't actually seen a '44.

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ryan ,

that is what is known as a jailbar model and it is usualy worth a lot more than other models , try googling , value ford jailbar truck , as others have said it wont be your retirement fund , but it is worth more , being a jail bar.

Rex

All 42-47 Ford, conventional cab, trucks had that style grille. Ergo, they were all "Jailbar" trucks, so there were no other models

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It's a rare truck because only a few hundred were sold for civilian use during WW2. Then again, they aren't that rare because the same model was made for several years before, during and after the war. So I would think it should bring a good price but more because of its excellent condition, than the year it was made.

I know agriculture was considered vital to the war effort which would explain why he was able to buy the truck. It would be interesting to learn what kind of authorization or application was involved in getting a priority and what criteria were used to qualify.

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I think priorities for things like cars and trucks were probably set by the War Production Boad. The WPB had the authority to determine and controlled what materials, products and services were necessary for the war effort. They awarded contracts for the production of goods and services for the military departments. So, if you needed a new truck you probably had to apply to the WPB for certification that the truck was necessary for the war effort. Then the War Department, which owned all the new cars and trucks and factory spare parts, was authorized to sell the truck.

I don't know which, but there was a government agency that determined what occupations were critical to the war effort and exempted people in those occupations from the military draft and service. My dad was a firefighter and he enlisted and shipped out to California for basic training early in 1942. Within 6 months the city had him classified as critical and he was discharged and shipped back home.

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My uncle was the owner of a small trucking company and had a contract to haul milk from the farmers to the processing plant. He was having trouble keeping his '39 COE Chevrolet covering his route, and applied to the WPA for a new truck. While it took him a couple of months to get approval he had no choice but to accept a 1944 Brockway cab&chassis. Which was titled to him as a 1944.--Bob

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Does that have the Ford emblems in the side of the hood, or is the Ford script stamped into the metal?? I know the '42's & 43's had the emblems, but I haven't actually seen a '44

Im pretty sure that the emplem is stamped. I'll ask my Grandparents tonight to confirm. Thanks guys for keeping this thread alive. Its been really interesting to see everyone's response.

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Ryan50: with all due respect for our great organization, I think you should post this on the Early Ford V-8 Club of America forum if you haven't already done so. I saw a 1944 truck like this at a EFVC meet a few years ago except it was a stake bed. The guy had all the original paper work, gas ration stamps, petition to purchase the truck, etc. His was not nearly as nice as yours. Very interesting stuff.

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I never said this truck was military, I just stated the fact that the truck would be more valuable as military. In the quest to have a military vehicle many civvies are alterred. the supply of true military iron dried up long ago so today,s restorers get repop MB/GPW bodies and mount them on CJ chassis,or they turn 41 Plymouth, Ford,andChevy 4dr sedans into staff cars.The 42 models are nonexistent. In the early postwar years the true militaries couldn't be given away, now they're go Re: 1944 Ford Truck Model 49T

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Dave Mellor NJ

The truck is in great condition but I think it would bring more money if it was military.

No Dave, I believe you're incorrect. If this truck was military it would've had the data plates on it, and it would've left the factory with tow hooks coming through the front grill piece below the headlights and above the front bumper. That grill piece would've been factory stamped to accomodate for the holes for the tow hooks.

ld.

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I never said this truck was military, I just stated the fact that the truck would be more valuable as military.

You're right Dave, but without the tow hooks and the data plates, you might be destroying the value of the truck by trying to make it into something that it isn't.

In all actuality, with so many trucks during that year being mostly military, that truck might be worth more just the way it is.

Speaking of wartime vehicles, go to www.firetrucks-atwar.com and you'll see a good collection of war trucks (many of them being Fords). Attached to this post, you'll see a '42 Ford / American LaFrance. This truck is a war truck, thus you'll see what the front of a war truck looks like.

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that is what is known as a jailbar model and it is usualy worth a lot more than other models , try googling , value ford jailbar truck , as others have said it wont be your retirement fund , but it is worth more , being a jail bar.

I would've never guessed that. We have a '42 Ford fire truck, but I always liked the looks of the '41's better.

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"but I always liked the looks of the '41's better. "

Most people do, including myself...

I think the value of this particular truck is in its condition, and provenance.... that certificate from the War Production Board makes this particular vehicle "special", in my mind...

This truck is a significant part of American history, as part of the "Homefront story"...

GI trucks, while they have their own following, were produced in far greater numbers, and probably more survive ( or have been recreated ) than honest, documented civilian vehicles released during the War (1942-1945).

It is also worth noting that this truck would be considered a "black-out model", with trim that would normally have been chrome-plated given a paint finish instead, due to material restrictions of the War effort.

All that said; big trucks ( anything bigger than a pick-up ) have somewhat limited appeal, and if you're looking to get top-dollar and / or find a good home, you will have to do some creative / broad marketing, to find that buyer.

It would be a crime for someone to grab this truck cheap and convert it to a fake GI truck or rod it for a modern car hauler, ec.

Might be worth trying to contact Jay Leno ( through his website - jaylenosgarage.com ); he seems to have an itch for big trucks, and this one is unique enough that he might want it, or know of a good home for it...

Shame you have to part with it; hope you find a good, respeonsible home for it.

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  • 7 months later...

Ryan50: Have you sold your truck yet? Also, I was wondering if you had done any research on the serial number for your truck? The serial/engine number can be found beneath the access hatch on the transmission cover in the floorboard. The number is stamped on the transmission housing. It should be a 9 digit number preceded by a star and ending with another star. Your number should start with 99T, with the "T" indicating a 1 1/2 ton model. According to online research I have done, the remaining part of your serial number (for a true 1944 model) should be a number "lower" than 623330, as that is the first number of the 1945's. You have a very good looking truck and some great supporting documentation to go with it!

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My Grandfather searched for that serial number and only came up with GST-72. He did go over some of the old paperwork; after reviewing the title he found that it stated that is was a 1945 model. I'll be heading out that way in a few weeks. When I get there I'll see if I can come up with anything new.

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That is interesting that the title is showing 1945. The truck might have a replacement engine that was a '45. That is why the original serial numbers were stamped on the transmission housing instead of the engine - since engine replacements were common. I don't know what the GST-72 number would be. You can look around on the below website which has a bunch of good info on the flatheads and serial numbers. Hope you can find some new info when you take another look at the truck.

Ford Flathead Engines - VanPelt Parts & Service

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hey Perkins, thanks for the interest. Im actually heading out there this weekend to pick up a 72 Chevy C10. While Im there, I'll go through the Ford real good. Im was talking to my Gpa about selling it the other day and Im thinking it will probably be a local sale or something via the internet. Wish he lived a little closer, I'd love to drive it back and put it in a few parades; however I'm looking at a 14 hour drive one way.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 3 months later...

I have a 1944 Ford Fire Truck Model 99t and I would like to find a list of Ford production numbers for 1944 and 1945. I have tried several web sites with no luck. I would also like to find a maintenance and overhaul manual. The truck was built by Hahn Motors Inc. on a 1944 Ford chassis. Any help would be appreciated.

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Backacheacres: I just replied to your pm, and I mentioned the vanpeltsales.com and wnyrg.org sites. However, in reading your posts to this thread, I'm not sure if you are going to find what you're looking for on the 1944 SNs. I couldn't find anything specific for 1944, but I think I have confirmed that the final 1942 SN was 539426 and the first 1945 # was 623330. So if your number falls between those two, it is narrowed down a bit. With primary production in '43 and '44 being for the war, it is tough to find specifics on 1944 SNs...

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I believe the "99" was just the prefix that the Ford and Mercury serial numbers were assigned beginning in 1939 and ending in 1946 for the V8 models. The "T" indicates 1 1/2 ton truck. Looks like you have a late model '44.

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