unimogjohn

Avanti R2, 1963, refresh

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October 21st.  Well, Joe and I got the new power steering cooler in, actually Joe did it all; and the bumper back on the Suburban.  The power steering cooler lines were about to go, all rusted.  The bumper now on the truck looks really good, like brand new.  We still have to mount the fog lights, but left that for another day as we have to separate the light from its mount to get it back in.  We should have assembled the entire bumper with it plastic parts before mounting it, but could not figure out how we would fasten it down to the car.  So we went the piece part route.  Next time we will know better.

 

 

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Sunday,  Oct 21st.  Joe, Alice and I took the 1928 Buick and the 1966 Morris Traveller to a local car show.  It was all young racers/tuners with their race cars.  But we had a great time as they had never seen such old cars.  So there was a lot of good conversation going on.  We all had a great time.

 

Had to bump start the 28.  I heard a thud and then nothing.  Looks like the selenoid gave up afer 90 years.  So will have to investigate and see if I  can find another.

 

 

 

 

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The solenoid is really called a "starter switch".  It is simply two contacts pushed together to engage the starter.  One of the contacts must have broken.  They are still available NOS for around $25.

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Well I found a NOS starter switch on Ebay and bought it, shipped to my door for $22.45.  I think I can install it without pulling the starter, but may anyway to have it 

serviced/rebuilt locally for around $120.  After all, the car is 90 years old.

 

 

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It is Tuesday, October 23rd.  The Tesla car is back at the Tesla Service Center in MD.  While on our trip to KY last week a warning kept coming up indicating the car needed service and may not restart.  So took it in yesterday.  We are now driving a Jaguar for a few days.

 

I took off the start switch on the 1928 Buick.  Looks fine inside, but is very dirty and greasy.  I will clean it and put it back on the starter to see if the cleaning helped.  I did put 6 volts to the starter itself and it spun just fine.  

 

 

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Wednesday, Nov 11th.  Winter is coming so got all the old cars ready for their long slumber and got them all covered from dust and debris.

 

I worked on the 1928 Buick's ignition switch and got the contacts all cleaned up.  Reinstalled it, cleaned all the battery connections, hooked up the battery; and the starter ran great.

 

I also got a new front suspension kit for the 1953 Jaguar.  It is still riding on its original rubber bushings, tie rods, etc.  All the existing rubber is dry rotted and falling apart.  This will be a good mid winter project.  I do want to take off the rear lever arm shocks and have them rebuilt.

 

 

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We had friends stop by from California.  Of course they were in their Unimog.  They spent a couple of days visiting and doing maintenance on their truck.  One issue was a broken clamp and mount for their safety railing.  I fired up the old Millermatic 35 and made short work of the repair.  

 

 

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The BMW Z4 has been struggling to start.  I decided to replace the battery with the correct size.  Pics of old and new for comparison.  Any easy install.  Put in an AMG battery.  Starts much better now.

 

 

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December 7th, Friday.  It is becoming winter fast.  We have had a few snow flurries over the past couple of days.  But good old Greg continues to plug along on his Oakland engine.  Here is his latest report.

 

The Overland oil pan spent the day on the rotisserie.   Holes plugged and mounted on the machine I made to rotate the Model A wire wheels for painting ( a long time ago).   in order to clean the scale clinging to the chamber inside.

 

First  was a solution of Pine Sol and a handfull of drywall screws found  nearby,  then a bath of mineral spirits,  an hour or so of dishwash detergent and followed by water.    Next I'll take the pan outside and hose it out.

 

One of those chores that needed to be done.  That machine made from scraps has a lot of miles on it.
 
GREG.
 

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Speaking of engines, Greg also has a Ford Model T engine report for us.  Progress on many old car fronts.

 

Guys,

Tonight Nate and I ventured to darken Mitch Sine's doorstep.  He's been handling the initial cleaning  of the Model T block and crank.  Initial inspection shows no cracks,   .003/.010 cylinder taper,  the deck fairly true with original  inspectors stampings.   All in all,  he says one of the better blocks he's seen.
       
The crank,  he thinks would clean up with .010 on the mains and .020  rods.....should it pass magnafluxing. which is the next phase of the rebuild.   
           
Enjoyable evening.
GREG.
 
 

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Greg must be excited about getting the Oakland running again.  He is pushing forward on the engine.

 

Progress on the Overland.    Their oil pumps were made from zinc die cast and aluminum.   Perhaps OK when they were new but didn't live long.   Through the network I located an Overland enthusiast that had duplicated the pump in bronze and had an extra on the shelf.   Then having lain on my shelf for a long time,  when I went to test fit the thing....there was a difference.   The driving shaft was different.   After a few nights' work,  I've replaced the shaft  and also reproduced the coupling that I'd lost .    Coming along.

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It is Tuesday, December 11th.  The 2003 Passat celebrated its birthday today, 15 years old.  So a few weeks ago I started buying supplies to do a major maintenance  service.  So today the work started in earnest.

 

First up is to replace the headlights, bulbs and complete housings.  Expensive, but the old ones would not pass inspection as the coating was flaking off the inside of the bulb housing and the light was not projecting.  So I found a new set, but now I am waiting for bulbs.  But the old ones are out.  Of course had to take off most of the front of the car to get them out.

 

Next was a oil and filter change.  Done.

 

To do over the next few days.  Coolant change; brake fluid change; transmission oil change; and cv axle change/boot torn on the old one

 

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Oh forgot.  The Tesla told me that it needed to go into the Tesla Service Center as it was having some 12 volt battery issues.  So we headed in to the Rockville, MD Service Center and they replaced the battery.  This battery runs all the electronics and lights in the car.  It gets charged up from the main battery pack when we charge up or just going down the road.  

 

A couple of months ago we were in KY and the car told us that it had to be serviced or it may not restart.  So we took it into the Service Center.  It was there for a week.  They found a failed main battery coolant pump and a out of spec drive motor.  So they replaced them both.  The drive motor consists of the electric motor, inverter and transmission.  All one big lump.  Sure nice to have a warranty.  

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I told you that Greg was moving on his Oakland.  Here is his latest report.

 

Dave Coleman called me over today to see how the flywheel is coming.  Indicated and true in his Sebastian gap lathe, he's taken some light cuts to true the clutch taper .   There are some pits that remain but the leather face and iron wheel should mate nicely.

 

    Next friend Dave is going to check the rotating balance of this ninety pound millstone.
  Good to see some progress even if someone else is doing it.
 
 

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Wednesday, December 12th.  I got a few more hours with the Passat.  Drained the transmission fluid, which was black, not red.  So much for being "life time".  I wonder what VW engineer thought that one up?  Anyway, it was real dirty.  And the magnets in the pan were deep with cruid.  I put my finger into each one of them so you could see how much.  Tomorrow I will clean the pan and magnets, put in a new filter and fill the transmission.  

 

 

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It is Thursday, December 13th.  The transmission filter and fluid change is complete.  Cleaned the pan really well, installed the new filter, installed the pan with a new gasket and filled it with fluid.  Ran the car through the gears and then put in another quart until it started to run out of the fill hole.  All done and not too messy.  Pic also of the various tools to do the fluid change. Thanks to Alice for doing the pumping to fill the transmission.

 

Tomorrow, a coolant change.

 

And Chris, to answer your question.  141,715 miles.

 

 

 

 

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It is Saturday, and we have an Oakland report from Greg.

 

 I find myself without adult supervision and left to my own devices.   Overland engine work is about caught up with some things being done out of house. 
   What to do?    Back to the bodywork,  especially the doors and doorways that I'd begun quite some time ago.
 
 Having rolled and attached the sheet steel skins over the wooden framing and already having  spent too much time forming the aluminum  T moldings, it was time to attach them.  I guess.   Off and on innumerable times,  this time I  used our old trick of bonding them with JB weld as well as screws.    And Temple I also ran a bead of  3M  Urethane Seam Seal  around the edge of the Mounting flange .
 
  You know I walked away from this project months ago and I sure hope I was ready to secure the moldings.   I'll do the other door tomorrow  with lots of other detail work to come.   Hinges,  latches and more moldings.   And then getting the doorways to fit them will be a real b1+(#.
 
 Even though this car only has two doors,   cars with no doors are easier.
 
OK  ,  got in more door time.    Temporary attachment of the hinges and tried the left door on for size.   Not too bad.
 
Bead lines on door and seats parallel in both planes and decent gaps but when the door was pressed the last 1/8" home the door itself would lift in the opening.     Did some noodlin around to find the bind without any real conclusion and then devised a method to find the confliction.   Masking tape on the lower molding  and some carbon paper (you oldtimers remember carbon paper?).      A couple swipes at the tell tale with coarse sandpaper and the door closes now.    There will be lots more of this going on.   Might be gaining on it but like moving the Pyramids by hand.

 

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I had a chance on Friday to change the coolant.  All went smoothly.  Actually, the coolant still looked pretty good.

 

Tomorrow I hope to find the time to replace the brake fluid.  Going to use a Motive Pressure unit that I have.  I hope that all the bleeder valves come loose easily.

 

 

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December 18th, Tuesday.  Worked all day on the Passat.  Changed the brake fluid.  The fluid was very dark, the new DOT 4 fluid is almost clear.  The Motive bleeder worked great except for a rotten clear line.  I had to replace it with rubber fuel hose.  But in the end all worked great and the fluid was 100% changed.  All the bleeders opened easily.

 

I also rotated the tires.

 

I then turned my attention to replacing the front CV axle.  Now that was a job.  Had to use long extensions to get the bolts to let go.  And had a struggle to remove the axle without undoing any suspension parts.  Hopefully, the new axle will go in easily.  A job for tomorrow.

 

Then onto the headlight replacements.

 

 

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Edited by unimogjohn (see edit history)

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December 20th, Thursday.  Worked all day on the Passat.  It was a struggle to get the front axle in,  just really tight.  I am sure glad I was able to get it in  without taking apart the suspension.  So everything is nice and tight and torqued to specs.  I found out the tail on the transmission is full of gear oil.  Found the plugs, and drained and put in new synthetic oil.  It has an oil seep.  I will watch it and replace the seal another time.  It too will be an involved job as you have to remove the exhaust, heat shielding and some other stuff, none of which wants to come off after 15 years.

 

Tomorrow, headlights.

 

 

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