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A/C conversion


Coop
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I'm fairly certain that our '90 coupe has lost it's R12 charge. I was wondering if anyone has ever had a conversion to R134a done. Was it a direct replacement of refrigerant? Did the orifice size need changed? Did the condenser need replaced? Was it expensive? How well does it work? Yata yata yata, any help would be appreciated. wink.gif" border="0

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Guest Greg Ross

If you've lost your R-12 Charge?<BR>The conversion is simply changing the fitting, those who've commented here have noted no change in AC performance.<BR>First order of business would be a pressure test and go from there.

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I highly recommend you ask the fine people at the a/c bulletin board.<BR> <A HREF="http://www.aircondition.com/wwwboard/" TARGET=_blank>http://www.aircondition.com/wwwboard/</A> <P>It's much more than just changing a fitting. The system has to be flushed, the o-rings have to be changed to the newer style, and you may need a new compressor or at least a rebuilt one that has R134a-compatible gaskets and seals. It's also a good idea to replace your accumulator.

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Have had two systems (90 Bonne serval years ago, 88 Reatta in November) converted. Both systems received new driers & were flushed and evacuated but only O-rings am aware of being changed were where the system was opened. Think they put a variable oriface tube in Reatta but not 100% sure (not at receipt).<P>Shop guarenteed for a year and both systems will freeze you out. I have modified the cooling systems in both for lower (180F) operating temperatures, bring fans in earlier, and increased the drive idle on Reatta to 700 rpm (from 625) for better performance at stop lights.

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Guest C.F.Massie

Did you do a search on this subject at this site? There was a lot of discussion in the past on this. As far as changing 'O' rngs out, that's not quite true, when you have it converted they make sure the R134 is accompanied by injecting the proper lubricant in the system also. This lube takes care of the problem of 'O' ring deterioration, which used to be a problem when R134 first came out. Have a professional do it they will make sure the system is properly purged and evacuated, this is the killer when it is not done correctly. I have had it done on my 89 Reatta and Padgett is right it sure gets a lot colder than the original R12 ever did. Good luck....

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I attended a tech session at the Corvair national and there were a couple of things of interest.<BR>*System must be flushed of old oil..need to remove 99%<BR>*New accumulator/dryer a must.<BR>*134 is sensitive to air, must have good pump down and purge gage lines when connecting to reduce/eliminate forcing air into system.<P>Try to find shop that will give warranty, as most conversions work for a while even when done poorly.

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Guest wally888

I had my wife's 93 Caddy done at Caddy Dealer. I questioned the mechanic as all he did was purge, change fitting, fill. He said that was all the latest (2001) instructions from Caddy, GM, required?

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COOP... why not try this!!! <B>YOU CAN DO IT!!!</B> I recently conveted my 92 Crown Vic and my 79 Toronado to 134. <B>Very simple to do with a $30 kit from Strauss or Auto Barn.</B> Both vheicles really only needed one can of R12 but I had to convert them. Properly purge R12 (i.e. vacuum evacuation) or just hit the valve and let it out. Screw the new adapters on (you cant mess it up... they're different sizes.) Attach charging hose on the cans supplied and let her rip. The kit includes new compressor oil <B> and leak sealer.</B> Simple quick and EASY... not to mention <B>VERY COST EFFECTIVE.</B> cool.gif" border="0

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I bought one of these kits to do my own conversion. My system is down far enough that the compressor is kicked out. I haven't read the manual enough to figure out how to override the compressor kick out. Can someone enlighten me on this procedure?

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When you are working on the A/C make sure the you check the Air flow If it feels weak coming out the vent. You may need to clean the the condensor. <P>It is a 1 1/2 on the wrench scale to do it yourself. You will need to remove the electronic contol that is in the top of the air duct above the condenser and the blower motor. You can look down in ther and you will most likely see a bunch of lint ,leaves and all kind of stuff on the condenser. <P>I just used some citrus brake cleaner and then soapy water then rinse.<P><BR>It makes all the difference and you may not need any air condition recharge.

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To force the compressor to engage, the simplest thing to do is to apply 12 volts from the battery to the compressor clutch. I built a cable comprised of two wires with small battery clips on one end and pins on the other. Just remove the existing connector that is plugged into the clutch and put the pins on the terminals, then attach to the battery.<P>You can also jump out the low pressure switch. but that may be harder to locate.

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Gearhead: My 92 Ford compressor dropped out when freon charge went down. After putting in 4 canisters of 134 compressor is not dropping out and the air is <B>nice and cold!</B>. cool.gif" border="0

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