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mdh7475

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About mdh7475

  • Birthday 09/01/1957

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  1. Hi Gary, Straight 8 (formerly Classic and Exotic) in Michigan sells the bronze cups for similar shocks links.
  2. Patrick Kelso made a few boat tail bodies a while back.
  3. The ultimate uppitty farmer transporation was the Minneapolis Moline UDLX - the automobile/farm tractor. Very rare and very valuable today. In the depression it sounded like a good idea to supply both in one vehicle, but farmers thought it too uppitty and very few were sold.
  4. Great pictures! I dont think any of those conversions would quite pass safety standards today!
  5. The 1910 Enger 40 touring car that I am in the middle of restoring was turned into a grain grinder for a small cattle operation in Aurelia Iowa by the original owners of the car. I would have to think that a 20 year old car at the beginning of the depression was fair game for anything to happen to it.
  6. I just read in Old Cars magazine that Randy Rundle, owner of Fifth Avenue Antique Auto Parts in Clay City Ks had passed away earlier this month. I never met Randy, but having called him several times on the phone in the last couple years, he always took the time to thoroughly answer any questions I had. I found his series of books very informative and a big help for any antique car restorer. I am sure many others feel the same - he will be sorely missed....
  7. Thanks Harm, I will plan on using the bearing. The shaft is driven by the lower timing chain, so there is some axial load on the bearing, but no impact like a crankshaft. There is an oil inlet hole very close to the small inclusion, so indirectly it will act as an oil groove. Oil is pressure fed to the front bearing, the accessory shaft has an oil passage drilled diagonally through the shaft to feed oil to the rear bearing. It looks like Stutz did a good job of providing oil to all bearing surfaces. I'll press onward. Thanks everyone for the advice. Mark H
  8. Hi Harm, Back to the babbitt pour. I decided to bore my first pour attempt to see how deep the inclusions were, and to my surprise the surface cleaned up surprisingly well. I need to finish at 1.500, currently at 1.475 - so I will finish by reaming bearings in place in block after I finish pouring the second bushing. My question is - I still have a small inclusion that is getting smaller as I remove material, and there are inclusions at the bottom of the pour. The rest of the bearing surface is clean. (see pictures attached). Would you be comfortable using this bearing from what you see here? This is the front bearing of two that are separated by about 1.5" gap. Has anyone ever used a large mag drill as a line boring machine? Thanks in advance, Mark H
  9. Well - going backwards from this discussion to the babbitt pour - I did attempt my first pour yesterday, and I will probably have to redo my first attempt. I think I lost too much heat in the molten babbitt and my mold when I poured it. I was not happy with the tinning process and I think I lost too much heat in the bronze bearing. The instructions I read with the Tintite said to heat part to 650 - then wipe the molten Tintite off with a rag until shiny material is left - all the time not letting the part fall below 450. That proved to be quite a task as I had to quickly attempt that then put the rest of my mold together. When I was finally able to pour, the babbitt set up way too fast in the mold and created a few inclusions that will probably not be able to machine out. I did learn quite a bit for my first attempt. I used dry graphite on my center tube and anywhere I did not want the babbitt to stick and I must say it worked perfectly. I did not taper the tube - but did not have to as it pressed out without any fight at all. I also need to heat the babbitt material more efficiently as the little electric cast iron ladle I was using didnt seem be able to heat much above the 795 degree pour temp. I was also fighting the dross forming on the top of the babbitt which took too much time also. I think a bottom pour ladle is the way to go on my next attempt, which I hope to do next weekend. Attached are two pictures of the mold set up. I would also guess that the way aluminum dissipates heat didnt help my temp issues.
  10. Hey Ed - The tour in Ohio of oddballs sounds great - I will have to be a spectator though. If they do another one in 10 years perhaps I will have the only known Enger 40 rolling by then - thats if the Stutz doesn't kill me or put me in the poor house first .....
  11. Thanks Harm, I have read articles and have seen videos where people have used the "soot" off of acetylene torch flames, or another release agent used was graphite. I think I might try both. If the babbitt sticks to my center post I am in real danger of destroying my bronze shell trying to push it out. I have really enjoyed following your progress on your car. I am a definite amateur at this game starting on a car that should have been out of my comfort zone - but at 63 years old to start in the hobby you might as well go for the gusto !! I think the most important things I have learned so far are to study as much as possible before trying whatever you need to do (which has been much easier due to the vast knowledge of people on this site that are willing to help), listen to the advice from people that have already done what you are trying to do, and not be so worried about screwing up that you dont do anything. I'm in the hobby to learn, and the learning part has been very rewarding. Hopefully I will end up with a car that I can be proud of.
  12. Thanks Harm for all of the info on your babbitt pour. I am hopefully going to give it a try this weekend. My project is re-babbitting the two bronze bearings for the accessory shaft on a 1929 Stutz. I plan on using an electric heat treating oven to preheat the mold which I have made out of aluminum. The heat treating oven is programmable so keeping the mold at the proper temperature will not be a problem. I have a 1000 degree stick type thermometer which I plan to use on the molten babbitt material. I will take some pictures of my set up and first attempt. Wish me luck!
  13. Not to throw another marque into the mix, but I just hope someday to drive the 1929 Stutz M that I am restoring. At the pace I am going at I hope that there is still refined gasoline for sale when I am ready to drive it ......
  14. The only person that I could recommend to ask that question is Mark's magneto. He rebuilt the Bosch coil that I eventually purchased for my car.
  15. Hey John - double check the tube - I thought what I had was rubber tube also until I picked the hard outer layer off - then I found the cloth layer underneath. I have 3 pieces of the old armored cable that look just like that. Mark H
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