Jump to content

help identify radiator shutter


harvest
 Share

Recommended Posts

i have these 2 radiator shutters that im trying to figure out what they were for?  i think the smaller one (20" tall X 19" wide) could be for a ford model T or A?  i have no clue on the tall shutter that measures (33" tall X 20" wide).  any help identifing is much appriciated. thank you5384A3AC-386C-4647-8812-E47FF91E3C13.jpeg.c40db9c257622f1cda93a4ecfa16f8a4.jpeg197A4D7F-D401-4466-BEE2-EFAF3B28AFFF.jpeg.cb0262184bd0aa8ec0c27bf52911986a.jpegE35CDCAA-8FC5-46FA-9A12-97E5493F5057.jpeg.795ce2e760742a2bfcfdf4244f7530ad.jpegC5B33E55-0232-4E61-A710-C734C7C87779.jpeg.330cce830084a65d0efba86dbea965ec.jpeg05127B9A-4F70-4705-8D86-9F45985E08EC.jpeg.04efa1cc4f102163d543ab2f2399fb0e.jpeg0499F4B9-510F-435C-8B1A-4507813BEC34.jpeg.180becc145bdd4ac95c9dcc2d6fe9edd.jpegF473D43E-501B-43F3-83A9-3D289133A798.jpeg.b2a67926f1775058d33251d5bf811be6.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The smaller one was an after-market item. Pines was one of a couple common manufacturers of similar items, and made a wide variety of sizes and shapes. They even made a few that were offered as factory options on a few cars. If I recall correctly, Essex may have offered them in the early 1920s, and possibly Hudson as well.

They even made specific versions for cars like Buick with distinctive radiator shapes. Some mid to late 1910s Maxwell cars had a "widow's peak on their radiator shells. I once saw a winterfront made especially for Maxwell with a dip top center to fit against the Maxwell's widow's peak!

This one? 19 inch wide should fit any model T pretty well, however 20 inch tall may be a bit too much even for the tallest model T radiators used from 1924 through 1927. I think it would work okay, just cover a bit of the top shell and/or bottom valence/apron? It should also work well on a dozen other makes, including some Overland and Chevrolet models.

With an October 1931 patent date on it, it would be a later version. Although they didn't look much different in the late 1910s and the 1920s. I think these were manufactured into the mid and even maybe late 1930s. However, by then, most cars had thermostats, which pretty much made winterfronts unnecessary. Of course,many people were still driving their old cars during the 1930s, and many of them may have needed a winterfront?

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, keiser31 said:

The 1929 Jordan may be a closer match....

1929 Jordan.jpg

i think that is it!   again, many thanks for finding that pic.  i know i will never own a jordan but hope to find someone who can use this

Link to comment
Share on other sites

28 minutes ago, wayne sheldon said:

The smaller one was an after-market item. Pines was one of a couple common manufacturers of similar items, and made a wide variety of sizes and shapes. They even made a few that were offered as factory options on a few cars. If I recall correctly, Essex may have offered them in the early 1920s, and possibly Hudson as well.

They even made specific versions for cars like Buick with distinctive radiator shapes. Some mid to late 1910s Maxwell cars had a "widow's peak on their radiator shells. I once saw a winterfront made especially for Maxwell with a dip top center to fit against the Maxwell's widow's peak!

This one? 19 inch wide should fit any model T pretty well, however 20 inch tall may be a bit too much even for the tallest model T radiators used from 1924 through 1927. I think it would work okay, just cover a bit of the top shell and/or bottom valence/apron? It should also work well on a dozen other makes, including some Overland and Chevrolet models.

With an October 1931 patent date on it, it would be a later version. Although they didn't look much different in the late 1910s and the 1920s. I think these were manufactured into the mid and even maybe late 1930s. However, by then, most cars had thermostats, which pretty much made winterfronts unnecessary. Of course,many people were still driving their old cars during the 1930s, and many of them may have needed a winterfront?

 

wayne, i appriciate you sharing that knowledge! :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is a guy back East named Dave(?) Jordan that would be a candidate for the larger one. A few years ago I sent him a wire wheel and a Jordan script gas gauge. If I can find his info I'll PM it to you.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 hours ago, sagefinds said:

There is a guy back East named Dave(?) Jordan that would be a candidate for the larger one. A few years ago I sent him a wire wheel and a Jordan script gas gauge. If I can find his info I'll PM it to you.

i appriciate that. i know i will never need this shutter. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
On 8/15/2022 at 9:20 AM, sagefinds said:

There is a guy back East named Dave(?) Jordan that would be a candidate for the larger one. A few years ago I sent him a wire wheel and a Jordan script gas gauge. If I can find his info I'll PM it to you.

Sorry,I never did find that guys info,sounds like they may not be Jordan after all. The National Auto Museum in Reno Nv does research for a fee. Those are good,straight louvers,I don't see any rustout,I don't know what they charge but it might be worth it for them to take a look. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...