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Need help identifying Studebaker tools


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5A4CFF3C-D28F-4A4C-8F2B-F0046CC6C685.jpeg.9c7fb8f605f60a5e516e42be941a6aa7.jpegHi, 

I’m trying to create a display of my husband’s grandfather’s Studebaker tools for our son. I need help identifying which of these tools are authentic Studebaker tools, as we were gifted a huge assortment. 
 

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Edited by Jillbear
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I've been going through a similar exercise to identify/put together a set of tools for my 1922 Studebaker Big Six, so I can give you my opinion on a couple of the tools you're showing.  The closed hex end/open end wrench in the center of your picture is a hub/spindle wrench for an early Studebaker - it's about 8-3/4" long.  The open end wrench at the far right of your picture looks correct as one of four of these type wrenches (all different sizes), again, for an early Studebaker.  The "S" shaped open end wrench towards the top is interesting - one of these came with my car but I haven't been able to determine if it is correct.  The fact that you have one also lets me believe it is correct.  About what year and model Studebaker are you talking about?  That would make a difference.  Looks to me like there's some speciality tools there that others on this forum, more experienced than me, will give you guidance on.  I'm sure they will chime in; and I am interested in what you find out about that S shaped wrench.   

 

Edited by Kfigel
correct misspelling (see edit history)
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Neat idea!  The hammer with the long "ears" is a tack hammer and is certainly not a Studebaker tool.  Neither is the steel pry bar next to the hammer. The Crescent adjustable wrench is from the right time period but I am not sure Studebaker would have included one.  And the pin punch above the feeler gauges would be an odd thing to put in a factory tool kit.  

 

Nathan

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Attached are some pics of the tools I assembled for my 1912 Flanders 20 based on the tools picture in the factory parts manual.  EMF and Flanders cars were rebadged as Studebakers starting with the 1913 model year.  Hope this helps.

 

 

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The "feeler gauge" is common to all vehicles, all manufacturers, especially those prior to the introduction of electronic ignition. Used for setting the gap in the spark plugs and the distributor points.

feeler.jpg

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First photo is the tool kit for a Light Six including the proper tool bag. Mine has the Budd/Michelin Disk Wheels so a few tools are specific to that option. There are illustrations in both the owners manual and the illustrated parts manual.  The parts manual lists tools specific to each model and, while the illustrations may differ slightly between some of the shared parts, the parts manual may list the same part numbers. This is because they used different vendors at times for their tools so it's not always an exact science. Take the tire pump for instance...slightly different between what was shown in the owners manual (second photo) vs the parts manual shows (3rd photo) but the parts manual shows a common part number for all models - same with the tire repair kit. Do you know what year and model you are focused on?

1120874669_LightSixToolswithDisc.JPG.0fc6d3e7e1aed219af428fa430bbf8b3.JPGIMG_20150215_193446.jpg.e2421628f0c98ce738c958ad2a772256.jpg1667966553_ToolsGroup2.jpg.e2da601eb05fcb0faeb85607a6cd3e88.jpgSCN_0003.jpg.d79b8696e44587bc6a8ad9a8574dbd11.jpgSCN_0004.jpg.de9652c178e0d5bfb47520adf6108618.jpg

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Wow, this is fascinating!  I appreciate everyone’s feedback!  I should have mentioned that my son’s great-grandfather worked in the Studebaker plant in assembly. As far as the date, I will try to get some better info. 
 

I truly appreciate your input!

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