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Kfigel

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  1. What pressure should I run my '22 Studebaker Big Six tires at? I have a new set of Goodrich Silvertowns on the car that states the max pressure should be 60 psi. Coming off our Buffalo winter all the tires now have about 35 psi. My owners manual says to follow that marked on the side of the tire. Thanks
  2. Thanks, Wayne. You kinda confirmed my understanding of the Speedster models of the 1920s. I believe they were a little narrower and lower than a Touring car to give them a more "sporty" look (?). When you throw in the very well known Porsche Speedster, things really get confusing.
  3. Was poking around for info on vintage speedster models and came across this post. Just for my info...a Speedster model from the 1920's was a different model from a Touring car, correct? I know at least Studebaker, Hudson and Marmons in the 1920's offered both Speedster and Touring models. The four door Speedster models were advertised as a 4 passenger auto (like the car in this post) since their bodies were a little narrower and lower than the compariable Touring model. The Touring models usually had jump seats that allowed for six passengers (Speedsters never came with jump seats). So there is a difference between a Speedster and Touring model. It also seems like Speedsters tended to come with side mount spares. These Speedsters were obviously different from the body style of the Ford Model T Speedster. Do I have this all correct?
  4. The welt around the edge of my front pass door has separated from the door panel material (see photo). Before I contact an upholster to repair it, I wanted to know just how it fits together. Since I put this original post up I found out it is double cord piping that is still available. Anyone want to add anything I'd appreciate it, but I think I'm all set.
  5. I could use the threaded 90 deg. "insert" that fits inside the priming cup for my '22 Studebaker Big Six (photo attached). I think it is a Lunkenheimer brand (but not sure). Anyone have one they'd like to part with or know of a source?
  6. Hadn't thought about the use/non-use of detergent oil...I'm sure the engine has never been apart, but the previous owner (a mechanic) who had the car for five years told me he dropped the oil pan when he got it and cleaned it out good-I know him and have no reason not to believe him. Anyway, in my naivety and at the risk of removing sludge that may be helping in such an old engine, would it be beneficial to run the engine a short time with detergent oil, then replace it with non-detergent oil? I know it would cost a few bucks and some labor, but wondering what your opinions were on that.
  7. Thanks to all for the input. Very helpful, as always.
  8. Am looking to do my first oil change on my '22 Big Six. The owners manual tells me to plan on installing 1-1/2 gal. of new, high quality oil with the weight that matches the temps I'll be driving in; which is 50 - 75 deg. in the northeast. With all the engine oil variations out there today, can anyone recommend a specific type of oil I should use and/or not use? I plan on removing and cleaning the oil screen also. The previous owner (had it for five years) had dropped the oil pan and cleaned it good (and I tend to believe him), so wasn't going to launch into that without cause. Thanks
  9. I have a pair of aftermarket "Kozy-Wings" wind wing brackets from the 1920's that I need the piece that actually clamps to the windshield frame. See photo; it's the clamp that has the three screws/bolts in it. Anyone happen to have a set or know of a supplier?
  10. Anyone have a feel if the radiator shrouds for a '22 and '26 Big Six are the same, or close to being the same, size? Pictures I have of both look like they would be but, of course, can't tell exactly by pictures.
  11. Thanks, Larry. Good to have a photo to go with the printed directions.
  12. Thanks for the info and story, Carl. I appreciate it. It sounds like we're a bit of kindred spirits! From your photos your top appears to be in similar, and probably a little better, shape than mine. I purchased my Studebaker Big Six one year ago from a fellow in a small town in Illinois who was at the point of passing on his vehicles to others. He was the third owner since new and all three gentlemen had been neighbors, so the car had never "left" that town. As such I know the complete history, with documentation, of the car from the day it was originally bought. This was definitely one of the reasons I purchased it-how many owners of nickel era cars can present their car that way? Anyway during that time it had been in storage for 72 years! The owners never knew that the top had been ever been lowered so I am faced with leaving it alone, or lowering it as I would really like to and risk some damage; which is what led me to this post to begin with and I have received a lot of very good information. Once lowered, I plan to leave it in that position as I know my grandkids will enjoy touring in a completely open car as opposed to even a partially enclosed one. I won't be restoring the car and have been surprised how well the car is responding to some cleaning and polishing. I'll seek out some Surflex as you used to try to "soften" the top's material - it almost seems like a plastic type of material. It certainly isn't the replacement fabric material tops I've seen on other touring cars that have been restored. Your car exhibits the care you've put into over the years, Carl. Thanks again.
  13. Thanks, Hugh. This certainly has more detail than my Studebaker owners manual. As you say, it looks very similar. I'll definitely use it as a guide as I attempt my first lowering.
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