Mpgp1999

Proper use of gaskets

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This is probably obvious for many old timers in this hobby but myself being 20 I am not sure what the proper edict for gaskets is. 
 

In short I am replacing the gasket for my oil pan. It leaks a lot. It appears to be made of rubberized cork? Or some felt/cardboard material? I am not entirely sure. I have often made gaskets out of gasket paper I.e. for the carburetor to block. And I have made them out of a cork roll I.e. on the reverse gear on the transmission. I that case I oiled the gasket so it can be removed easily. If I recall correctly I remember reading that was the proper way to do it from a very old manual. I also did the same for the copper head gasket. When I removed the head I was able to reuse the gasket. 
 

RTV

some people swear by it others swear at it. I personally do not think there needs to be any rtv on a historic vehicle. 
 

back to the oil pan gasket. what is the best way to put it on?

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Traditional would be to glue the gasket to one side with shellac (like Indian Head). Its slippery when wet, and that makes it easy to destroy the gasket, so depending on what gasket and where, you would either stick it to a pan and weight it overnight, or put it all together, barely snug it, and let the shellac partly set up before really tightening good. The advantage to gluing one side is that the gasket should stay with one side when you take it apart, dramatically increasing the chances of being able to re-use the gasket. The disadvantage is it is extremely tough to scrape off if you need to.

 

Beyond that, you will probably hear almost as many methods as there are regular posters in here. There are plenty of ways.

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Whatever route you choose GOOP THE CORNERS.

Seriously.

And while you're at it goop over the main rear bearing felts too.

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6 minutes ago, cahartley said:

Whatever route you choose GOOP THE CORNERS.

Seriously.

And while you're at it goop over the main rear bearing felts too.

I got new felts. I was planning on soaking them in oil then installing them. 

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Goop the ends anyway.......trust me.

For the record those felts were glued to the bearing cap at the factory.

I glued the dry felts to the cap using SuperGlue.

AFTER that anything goes....... ;) 

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Posted (edited)

I always make certain that the area around the holes in the oil pan are flat so they won't leak. I always use my finger to give a light coat of oil on the gasket. DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN! I have never had leaks after that.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)
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I bought a bottle of Indian shellac gasket stuff. I will use it on one side and a light coat of oil on the other after the shellac has cured. Should I use shellac on the felts?

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Not on the felts and, to be honest, I wouldn't shellac the gasket either but if you do shellac ONLY the oil pan side and grease the block side to aid in removing the pan again should it be necessary.

Always "cement" gaskets to the piece which is the most accessible.

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12 hours ago, keiser31 said:

I always make certain that the area around the holes in the oil pan are flat so they won't leak

 

Whatever you do, don't skip this....

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