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I like the big old trucks as well.   The first vehicle I restored was a 1925 Reo Speed Wagon  2 ton stake truck when I was in high school.  There is suppose to be a restored Peerless truck in California but I have never been able to locate it.  Most of the Peerless trucks went to England and there are a few there restored. It would be nice to find some more if they are around.

RHL

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I told Mike about that one in the mining town in California. Ran into a gentleman in Salmon who had seen the truck there and told me what town it went to when it sold a few years ago. Still, it's sort of like a bigfoot sighting. You hear about others who have seen one but you never see it yourself. Mike can tell you more.

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
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Hi greendragon, I would like to tell you where the latest bigfoot sighting was ? but I am planning on somehow tracking it down myself with the intention of acquiring the beast hopefully someday? but I reckon there must be a few others out there somewhere in the states, from information jeff has there were dozens of all sizes of peerless trucks auctioned off in the twenties, so they all wernt sent off to England, the goslings in the UK have 7 chassis's and only the mechanicals to build two trucks so even parts would be a big find !!

mike.

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  • 1 year later...

Some guys called "cherinana4u" have some vintage ads for sale including a picture of a WWI-Era Peerless Truck right now, alonng with pics of Reo, Packard & Pierce-Arrow Trucks. The Peerless one is a mobile machine shop. I couldn't get a good picture up, but this appears to be a company ad showing the virtues of their product in the war effort.

 

download (4).html1917 Truck

 

Antique-Truck-Advertising-Pierce-Arrow-REO-Packard-Peerless-1917

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  • 1 year later...

Hi Jeff, sorry haven't  spoken for a while but I still check in now and then,  seen a picture similar to that which the goslings have, i'm planning on a trip later this year for only one reason to check out your lead, still hoping to find a wild goose and check out a couple of other trucks while over there,  cheers mike.

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Say, thanks for checking in down here in Peerless Central. I was thinking about your quest to find a Peerless Truck....and that Providence has smiled on you with the gentleman from Wairarapa buying & transporting one of the best of them to your pleasant isles back in 2014. My observation of people who are hideously wealthy is that they sometimes change their mind about their collection goals. Back in the Sixties, there was someone who was collecting Bugattis here in the U.S, and amassed 10 or 20. Then he hears that, no, you need to have Duesenbergs or some other car if you want the best. Out go the Bugattis --- there´s a photo I saw of them all loaded on a train, heading somewhere where there were people who wanted Type 35 and Type 57 Bugattis more than he did(?). Maybe the collection of cars and aircraft he owns will modify, and he will trade something he is more interested in for the Peerless Truck. Like a Ford Trimotor, or a 1910 Gräf and Stift touring car. 

 

Getting one of those would be fairly difficult. Peter is interested in World War I artifacts. The car I mentioned is the one Archduke Franz Ferdinand was killed in, and still exists, in a military museum in Vienna. Pulling a plane like a Ford Tri-Motor out of your back pocket would be problematic, too, but who wants to buy a 1915 Peerless then pay shipping from New Zealand? While walking my dog a few years ago I stumbled upon a 1916 or earlier truck just 4 blocks from me, but the owner wasn´t interested in selling. It was an obscure vehicle with a brass plaque on the dash saying ¨Maximun Speed 16 MPH¨ just like the $73,000-dollar Peerless did, a Jeffery 4-wheel-drive. 

 

Interesting that you may be coming back this way again. If you find the truck, do I still get a square of beer?

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
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Hi Jeff, I should be so lucky, but I think once hes bought an item it goes into a sort of trust and then its a bit like trying to buy something from a museum with a committee full of members who all have different ideas about things, I still reckon persistence and timing play a part in this hobby, down here we say '' I owe you a box of beer and in aussie they call it a slab of beer, and yes if I find it you will get a box!  which by the way is 24 bottles''  jeff I was mad enough to bring a Liberty truck back from Spokane WA and the Packard I bought back from Idaho, and the pierce arrow came all the way from NY, so who knows whats next,

cheers mike.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I read a brief mention recently in Motor World Wholesale, July, 1922, that said the U.S. military still had over 2,000 trucks in Germany as part of the occupation. Now surplus, it was arranged to have them shipped back to the States and distributed to rural counties as part of a Department of Agriculture Bureau of Good Roads project to improve farm-to-market transportation. At the last minute, all but 30 were sold to the highest bidders in Germany, due to the Graham Anti-Dumping Bill. Peerless trucks proved themselves extremely durable during the war, and some may have been in that group.

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  • 1 year later...

Hi all, just a quick update, spent almost 3 weeks in the western states and got to the town rumoured to be the home of a peerless truck, over two days talked to some of the locals and also visited the local VFW hoping some of the members may have known the whereabouts of the truck, had no luck but at least had a good time and met some really interesting and freindly people, we were treated like royalty and wont forget our time there, 

nothing ventured nothing gained I suppose 

cheers mike

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I wish you could have found it, too, Mike. It would have been a real find. Was there a lot of forest fire damage from last year in the areas you traveled in?

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Hi Jeff,  there was a few areas higher up on the side of a range about 20 miles back from the town but nothing too major from what i saw, maybe its true and theres really no peerless trucks left in the states? Which i still find hard to believe,

mike.

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  • 5 months later...

Jeff, Do you know, do the Peerless trucks share  radiators with the passenger cars?  They sure look the same.  Years ago I was up close and person several times to the Peerless "Green Dragon? speedster that was in SLC.  That particular Peerless is now in Colorado or other points east.  Do you know of that car?  I scratch my head with the idea that it was a true factory built Speedster.

Al

Edited by alsfarms
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The Peerless cars and trucks had rad shells of similar shape in the 1910s, but I doubt they were the same. It is possible the 4 cyl T-head four used until 1912 by Peerless in cars has some connection to the Peerless truck motor, though. Both around 415 Cu. In. and 40 h.p., if I recall correctly. So, the former Ambassador to England moved or sold his Green Dragon car? I've never seen it in person -- but there are some interesting stories swirling around it -- it's even been discussed here on the Peerless Forum. More later. Is the Museum of Speed still there? Thanks for your interest in Peerless! It's an uncommon car of uncommon quality.........like Locomobile.

 

Re: the 1904, here is a postcard f/s on ebay that has a connection to it, according to one story:
s-l1600.jpg

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
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  • 1 month later...

File:Bird notes (1917) (14728286936).jpg

A little late for Veterans Day, a little early for Xmas and New Year greetings. From Wikimedia Commons, the National British Bird & Mule Club, Birdnotes, and the American Museum of Natural History. Shown is a 346th Military Transport Company War Department Peerless truck in 1916.

    "not a portrait, yet it is the replicaof a scene which the writer witnessed, when visiting one ofour members a il-w months ago. who was enjoying- a shortleave from his duties at the front—so, both       the plate and• title figure a bit of unexaggeratecl life. Here I must interpolate a word of appreciation andthanks to the artist (Mr>. Ali(( Al. Cook) who has so ablygiv( ii efifect to a mere word        sketch, and. moreo\er, has donethe work gratuitously, for wiiich we owi and lender her ouraj)preriative thanks. Th.e Xinas Card, an original (Mie from the AlacedoinanFront which we reproduce herewith, tells a similar story, andmany letters penned amid the stern realities and horrors of theWestern and Eastern fighting- lines echo the same refrain, thatthe home-life, its responsibilities and pleasures, are ever withthem, and several most interesting articles and letters in lastvolume of B.N. were penned amid the turmoil of thefighting-fronts of Mesopotamia, France, Flanders, andSiilonika. 1917-"

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
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  • 5 months later...

Sorry. I have just seen this. I dont come onto this forum often enough. 346 Co was in Salonika, Macedonia after a short stay on the Western Front. Great card.

 

Our Peerless chassis has been sandblasted, the front wheels have been cleaned and painted with new tyres on them. Springs are ready to go on. Axles are painted and ready to go on. A great deal is happening. It would go a lot faster if we could all travel to the same place to do it, but there we go. 

DSCN0203.JPG

DSCN0112.JPG

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How far along are you with the mechanics of the Peerless?  This Coronavirus has us all messed up for sure!  Your update is well received, keep your pictures and descriptions coming.....

Al

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Glad you liked the card from The Great War, Great war Truck! You even are familiar with the unit. I hope I got the abbreviations right...M.T. COY, etc. Wonderful to see you coming along with that Peerless Truck, with the chassis and piston castings. I bet there's a story about how you sweat on those solid tires.

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Luckily with the tyres we have access to a friends 100 year old tyre press. Lots of manual labour involved but this is how it was done during the war. These photos will give an idea of how it all worls. Also useful for trimming fingernails.

IMG_5561.thumb.JPG.9b570a4be10183fa0944087104fd8b84.jpg

IMG_5576.thumb.JPG.199b7e2ed3e981d047b7a2d5915fde34.jpg

IMG_5581.thumb.JPG.8eb7cd4a513f7cade222dc2fc2369b77.jpg

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