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Sunday, the TC ran fine. This morning I started it and it sounded like a fan belt was loose...a lot of loud squealing. It soon stopped, and I pulled out of the driveway. It did alright up to 15 MPH, then started jumping like it was trying to shut down. When I stop the car, it idles good. When I try to drive it again, it does this "buck-jumping" stuff. My engine is the 8 valve turbo II. Any ideas out there?

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thats a good question...I would check all vacuum lines , regardless....and the fpr

It all bears checking out, but the Hall effect plate, fuel filter, and fuel pump are new. Don't know about the pressure regulator. What kinda vacuum leak would cause it to do this jumping?
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Sunday, the TC ran fine. This morning I started it and it sounded like a fan belt was loose...a lot of loud squealing. It soon stopped, and I pulled out of the driveway. It did alright up to 15 MPH, then started jumping like it was trying to shut down. When I stop the car, it idles good. When I try to drive it again, it does this "buck-jumping" stuff. My engine is the 8 valve turbo II. Any ideas out there?

So the car's been sitting for a while and now it's bucking when you try to drive it, it could be vacuum causing your problem, or it could be a bad wire, or loose connection, it could even be a bad sensor. Before you get too carried away with this check your engine codes by turning your key on off on off and back to on and wait for the code to start flashing on your check engine light. All codes flash in two number groups with a couple of seconds pause time between the first number and the second. When you're engine light flashes five times and then flashes five times again, it's done talking.

If you have no codes put your foot on the brake with the car in gear and run the engine RPM up, if it starts to bog bump and behave badly you're looking for an un coded engine problem. If you get a nice smooth steady RPM climb under load and it wants to bog bump and generally misbehave when you try to drive it, you’re looking farther down the powertrain towards transmission connection speed sensor, engine controller, check for codes first and get back to us with what you find.

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Putting the 2 symptoms together, the only thing I can come up with is a seized water pump. Rather a pump that is trying to lock up. On a totally different car with a different belt system, I had the water pump seize and it broke the timing belt. I repeat this was a different belt system. If YOUR water pump is seizing up, it WILL NOT break the timing belt on YOUR car. It could definitely cause a bucking if it is trying to lock up though. I guess a power steering pump seizing could cause the bucking also. Maybe a paint stripe on both pump pulleys and rev the engine to see if one or the other is momentarily slowing or stopping? Add the alternator to the suspect list also.

My car was a 16 valve Neon. I never realized before this that any accessory could load the engine that much!

Time for Hemi to add a bit of experience here. Make that a LOT of experience.

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The only code I get is a "13". Haven't had a chance to chase down the vacuum lines.

13 is your MAP sensor and it does need vacuum to work like it should, find it under the hood on the passenger side to the front of the inner fender. To check for vacuum at the sensor start engine, pull vacuum line and use the tip of your finger to check for vacuum.

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13 is your MAP sensor and it does need vacuum to work like it should, find it under the hood on the passenger side to the front of the inner fender. To check for vacuum at the sensor start engine, pull vacuum line and use the tip of your finger to check for vacuum.

Sniff the line for gas also. Leaking fuel pressure regulator will also cause 13. I had that on 2 cars and the maps were good.

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The latest.........

The vacuum line from the manifold to the barometer solenoid was not hooked up on the solenoid. I checked it with the engine running and had good vacuum. The problem was that the hose was about three inches too short. The TC ran great for a month with it like that! I got a coupling and some more vacuum hose and hooked it up to the barometer solenoid and it's like "business as usual"!!! The one thing I noticed was a gasoline smell in that vacuum line. Is that going to be a problem in the future?

P.S. I really appreciate all the help and feedback I'm getting on this forum! Very nice to have quality help!

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The latest.........

The vacuum line from the manifold to the barometer solenoid was not hooked up on the solenoid. I checked it with the engine running and had good vacuum. The problem was that the hose was about three inches too short. The TC ran great for a month with it like that! I got a coupling and some more vacuum hose and hooked it up to the barometer solenoid and it's like "business as usual"!!! The one thing I noticed was a gasoline smell in that vacuum line. Is that going to be a problem in the future?

P.S. I really appreciate all the help and feedback I'm getting on this forum! Very nice to have quality help!

Not to surprised with the vacuum, sometimes things work when they shouldn't because other circumstances are just right.

Figure on replacing the fuel pressure regulator sometime in the near future. Start shopping now and you can maybe catch a good deal before you need to buy.

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When I get to the point of changing the fuel pressure regulator, what needs to be done prior to disconnecting the fuel line?

Get any pressure out of the fuel line. When you get to the point that you are actually going to do this you need to remember that some gas will come out of the line pressure or not, so don't do this over a hot engine and be careful of your surroundings. Otherwise follow the manual instructions and you should be fine.

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When you replace the fpr, replace the 2 flex gas lines under the hood by the firewall or fender with high pressure hose for a car with injectors. Note that the lines have different clamps than the regular hose clamps!

I'm guessing that the po had the car "fixed" when it threw a code 13. It was fixed by replacing the Map sensor which worked till the gas from a leaking fpr started causing problems again. I think that rubber line must shrink because on mine it was too short also. When you take it loose and reconnect, it is shorter and expanded at the end and won't stay put.

Now you know the secret to buying a really nice turbo Chrysler for a lot less that it should sell for.

I WAS going to shut up for a while......Oh well.

Edited by Bill Reichert (see edit history)
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When you replace the fpr, replace the 2 flex gas lines under the hood by the firewall or fender with high pressure hose for a car with injectors. Note that the lines have different clamps than the regular hose clamps!

I'm guessing that the po had the car "fixed" when it threw a code 13. It was fixed by replacing the Map sensor which worked till the gas from a leaking fpr started causing problems again. I think that rubber line must shrink because on mine it was too short also. When you take it loose and reconnect, it is shorter and expanded at the end and won't stay put.

Now you know the secret to buying a really nice turbo Chrysler for a lot less that it should sell for.

I WAS going to shut up for a while......Oh well.

Hey Bill,

Not going to argue that rubber hose doesn't shrink, because it does. My observation of this 3 inch shortage points directly to vacuum hose "spaghetti junction" and how well the air box remains attached to it's vacuum line. Fighting to pull this hard hose free moves the entire mass of "spaghetti" to the drivers side and pulls things free in the center and on the passenger side. Putting the breather line back on after it's pulled off it's spot on the valve cover doesn't move the tangled mass of rubber hose back to where it came from and with that some hoses become longer than they need to be and others are pulled free, or stretched to stay attached. Don't need to be sucking gas from the FPR to shrink that hose free from the MAP, this could happen to anyone, anytime they move that mass of hoses.

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The only other Chrysler turbo I have owned was a 1986 LeBaron GTS hatchback. I owned it in 1989, so it was still "new". This TC is my first venture with an "old" turbo car, and I'm having fun with it. Learning stuff can be fun with a car that is not depended on for daily commuting to and from work. You guys are helping me not get frustrated, along with my local mechanic, from whom this came was purchased in the first place!:D

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Drove the TC to town and back....about 10 miles, round trip. It ran great, but seemed a bit more sluggish on take off. Maybe a new Fuel Pressure Regulator will stop that?

A slight smell of gas in the vacuum lines is a slight smell of gas in the vacuum line and the FPR isn't the only thing in the system that can pass the slight smell of gas; wet with gas at the FPR vacuum hose connect is a sure sign of FPR problem.

If you have a problem with fuel pressure a new regulator would certainly help, are you sure that pressure regulation is the cause of your sluggish take off? Before going after the 50 dollar fix for a problem you might not have; you could try the 5 dollar fix. If I remember correctly and without looking back through posts for the last month, your car sat for a long time, got new fuel pump, filter and such before this last problem became a problem.

You just fixed a problem that was caused by lack of vacuum to the MAP, that lack of vac to the MAP also meant that you had an open line vacuum leak that would affect affect along with several other things, your timing. Pull the Neg battery cable and let your engine controller reset to default and then it can relearn normal operation, toss some fuel system cleaner in the tank, check your timing, give yourself a good hundred miles of normal driving and if it's still sluggish on take off you have something solid to look for. You could still have some crud working it's way through the system, your engine controller stores input information from multiple start run cycles to use for system management and it has stored faulty input, your timing could have been last set with an open vacuum line.

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A slight smell of gas in the vacuum lines is a slight smell of gas in the vacuum line and the FPR isn't the only thing in the system that can pass the slight smell of gas; wet with gas at the FPR vacuum hose connect is a sure sign of FPR problem.

If you have a problem with fuel pressure a new regulator would certainly help, are you sure that pressure regulation is the cause of your sluggish take off? Before going after the 50 dollar fix for a problem you might not have; you could try the 5 dollar fix. If I remember correctly and without looking back through posts for the last month, your car sat for a long time, got new fuel pump, filter and such before this last problem became a problem.

You just fixed a problem that was caused by lack of vacuum to the MAP, that lack of vac to the MAP also meant that you had an open line vacuum leak that would affect affect along with several other things, your timing. Pull the Neg battery cable and let your engine controller reset to default and then it can relearn normal operation, toss some fuel system cleaner in the tank, check your timing, give yourself a good hundred miles of normal driving and if it's still sluggish on take off you have something solid to look for. You could still have some crud working it's way through the system, your engine controller stores input information from multiple start run cycles to use for system management and it has stored faulty input, your timing could have been last set with an open vacuum line.

Man, you have a good memory!! lol

All this makes great sense to me. Do I take the negative cable loose with the car running, or not?

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NEVER with the car running!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I should have put that whole thing in caps!

With the car NOT running, remove the negative battery cable, leave off for at least 10 minutes, longer is better to force a return to default settings. Any electronics in the car will have to be reset, clock, radio presets, etc.

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I suspected so. That was a common trick back in the real old days to check an alternator, I think. I don't have to worry about the clock or radio, as neither of those work at the moment! haha

This is still a way to common trick that was originally used to test a generator back when no one had test equipment. In the "old days" the worst you could do was blow the voltage regulator and create the charging problem you were testing for. It was a chance you took when you had no other way to check the charging system, then came the alternator and the old trick still worked, but when it didn't you replaced the alternator. The newer the car the more things that can blow when this trick doesn't work and though you can get away with it a lot of times until it happens to you; when it does go south you can dammage any specific item to every electronic module in the system.

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You can also blow the electronics by jump starting another vehicle. When the dead car starts, the good car can get a severe electronic spike and end up needing a very expensive repair. Carrying a jumpstart device is a good idea if you like to rescue people or need to use it on your own car.

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Driving home yesterday, my boss slides up beside me in a CTS Caddy. I punched the little 8v turbo, hit passing gear and jumped out in front. Then, the engine just seemed to level off and quit climbing. That's when he fly by me. After I backed off, the check engine light came back on. (Code, once again, is a "13".) When I stopped at the gas station a couple miles down the road, I could smell that foul odor that a catalytic converter puts out. This morning, headed back to work, I tried it again, and reached 90mph before I got a mile away. (Hadda back off because a big curve was coming up.) These cars are a blast!!!!

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Driving home yesterday, my boss slides up beside me in a CTS Caddy. I punched the little 8v turbo, hit passing gear and jumped out in front. Then, the engine just seemed to level off and quit climbing. That's when he fly by me. After I backed off, the check engine light came back on. (Code, once again, is a "13".) When I stopped at the gas station a couple miles down the road, I could smell that foul odor that a catalytic converter puts out. This morning, headed back to work, I tried it again, and reached 90mph before I got a mile away. (Hadda back off because a big curve was coming up.) These cars are a blast!!!!

That rotten egg / sulfur smell is raw gas in your cat, you might want to take care of that before it melts your cat and becomes a real problem.

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