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slosteve

I had to have her - '65

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Congratulations ....... I like the Champagne Mist with the Saddle Interior ..... I've had my Grans Sport for about 10 years and get lots of compliments on the color combination.

Paul

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Welcome to the "More Rust Than I Thought" club

Do you know what process your shop plans to use when they repair it?

Being a member of said club myself I am interested to hear what your shop will do too. My windows will be coming out soon & I am anticipating the worst.

David

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Seems to be the norm on most rear windows, water stays in the track and rots out, just like the sail pannels passenger side floor board under seat and trunk that leaks to bottom rear quarters.

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I would never say i had a rust free car unless i had taken the frame off myself and chemically dipped it. It seems like today more than ever people love to paint over rust, and i mean just regular paint...not even rust converter. I had a local paint and body guy come by the shop the other day and give me tips on what he would do,etc. I'm not even going to repeat what he said out of respect for my elders, but to say my jaw dropped would be an understatement. There are shady people out there and it is a shame. Charging $8500 for a paint job while just scuffing it up and giving it the Maaco treatment, painting over rust, etc.

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Here's a couple shots of the rear window frame after rust repair. The next 2 challenges are how to paint/coat the bare metal underneath the repair and get someone to count the number of those little 'nailhead' looking things that the molding clips attach to. Mine has 2 on the drivers side 'vertical', 3 on the pass. side, 2 on the bottom horizontal and 6 across the top horizontal part of the frame. It seems that none are spaced evenly. I've got screws to install where needed if someone has a un-windowed frame they could look at & tell me if more are needed.

post-92559-143142733106_thumb.jpg

Steve

post-92559-143142733116_thumb.jpg

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You should be able to reach that from inside the trunk. While you're in there, smear a bunch of seam sealer around that area. If I don't work tomorrow, I'll take pictures and count how many / where the holes should be. I haven't looked for them yet, but I think the hardest thing to find will be those shoulder head screws that go into the holes and secure the clips.

Ed

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Hi SloSteve,

With the help of Joe B. (JWB65) on this board, I was able to remove my rear window on my '64 Sunday evening. On my '64 I show 8 screws across the bottom plate spaced approximately as follows (starting from the center):

1.5", 8.5", 15.25" and 21.6125" (that's 21 and five eighths).

Again, my numbers are from a '64, so I'm only assuming they're the same as your '65. The 1.5" measurement is from the *center* of the window, so if you lay out the measurements to the left, and then to the right, you should be very close to original.

In the spirit of of measuring twice and drilling once - I would wait for Ed to come back with his information to ensure they are similar to mine.

The new frame looks great.

Good luck.

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In the mean time, I found the screws. They're on the PDF page 62 on Mr. G's Enterprises www.mrgusa.com at the bottom of the page. BUT I don't know which of the three screws shown is the one we need. Open the fasteners link.

Ed

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On a riviera the areas of rust are rear window, sail panels inside to out, rear botton rocker panels from water getting into trunk and passenger side front floor boards. looks like the water gets in from vent wing window trickles down inside interior panel and ends up on the floor board.

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If I don't work tomorrow, I'll take pictures and count how many / where the holes should be. Ed

I took some pictures with a tape measure laid across the back panel and here's what I came up with. Disclaimer: The tape measure wouldn't lie like I wanted it to, and the pictures I took were not all that good; too close for a flash and too dark for no flash. What I could make out is this. 8 holes. Measuring from the left. Now these are not exact - see disclaimer. 2", 9", 16", 23" 25", 32", 37" and 46" This puts one close to each corner, two in the middle close to the ends of each molding piece, and others spaced about 7" apart. I don't think this need to be rocket science. All you're trying to do is get the molding to lie flat. On the side, I could only see three holes. One close to the bottom, one centered, and one closer to the top but not on the corner because this piece is curved and fits both the side and the top. I didn't get a look at the top. Matt was working on the dent by the lock and the trunk was open. I had to get the measurements I did from inside the car. Luckily the rear glass is out. Hope this helps. It's the best I can do for now. As I said above, Mr. G's Enterprises had the clips and the clip mounting screws. (Special screw with a shoulder.)

Ed

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On a riviera the areas of rust are rear window, sail panels inside to out, rear botton rocker panels from water getting into trunk and passenger side front floor boards. looks like the water gets in from vent wing window trickles down inside interior panel and ends up on the floor board.

Good points to know - thanks. This will help others when looking for possible rust during a presale inspection.

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One more thing to look at is the braces under the floor boards. They're not sealed against the elements so dirt and water will get in them even if the inside seals tightly. When they're full of dirt and the dirt gets wet, the rust will work its way up. The bolts for the front seat bracket go right into this bracket so lots of times the seat hold down bolts will be rusty as well. Same with the cups that connect the body with the frame at the front of the trunk. This area in the trunk gets it from both the top and the bottom. The rear window corners will corrode and let moisture in through the top; there are holes in the body mount cup that collect dirt and moisture in the same way that the floor pan braces do.

Ed

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In the mean time, I found the screws. They're on the PDF page 62 on Mr. G's Enterprises www.mrgusa.com at the bottom of the page. BUT I don't know which of the three screws shown is the one we need. Open the fasteners link.

Ed

Ed,

I looked a Mr. G's web site and I think you're right about the screws. Part # FA 3037 A is most likely to be correct since I just checked on of the original screws from my clips and it is a 24 thread count, which matches the thread count on the 3037 part number.

When I look for the actual molding clip that matches those on my '64 I think that FA 612 (at the top of page 60) is the one. Is that the way you see it? The link to Mr. G's windshield clips page is here: http://mrgusa.com/pdfs/60-62wsclip

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Someone recently posted a part number with picture of some clips they used which were in stock at their local NAPA store. You might search for that to see what they look like.

I printed the picture of the bag with the part # but it's at the shop with the car.

Ed

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I don't think this need to be rocket science. All you're trying to do is get the molding to lie flat. Hope this helps.

Ed

Thanks much for all of your effort, Ed. It is very helpful and much appreciated. The PO had used some sort of adhesive goo on the molding and now I know why. The top pass. side corner was lifted up at least 1/2" and I don't want that happening again.

Steve

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Hi SloSteve,

With the help of Joe B. (JWB65) on this board, I was able to remove my rear window on my '64 Sunday evening. On my '64 I show 8 screws across the bottom plate spaced approximately as follows (starting from the center):

1.5", 8.5", 15.25" and 21.6125" (that's 21 and five eighths).

Again, my numbers are from a '64, so I'm only assuming they're the same as your '65. The 1.5" measurement is from the *center* of the window, so if you lay out the measurements to the left, and then to the right, you should be very close to original.

In the spirit of of measuring twice and drilling once - I would wait for Ed to come back with his information to ensure they are similar to mine.

The new frame looks great.

Good luck.

Thanks for your effort also, Eric

While removing the hardened 'stickum' from my window molding I found these little divets. Pretty sure they're not from the factory and probably have something to do with why the PO needed something else to hold it in place.

post-92559-143142739658_thumb.jpg

Another project to sharpen my skills. :rolleyes:

Steve

post-92559-143142739606_thumb.jpg

post-92559-143142739618_thumb.jpg

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Yes, Napa has them like $10 a bag of 6 or more? I had the same type of damage on my rear window Chanel some of the studs were removed, just look at the pattern of studs or even measure them and add small SS screws they should hold the clips in. I did this with 10 in the rear window and 4 in front.

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...I found these little divets. Pretty sure they're not from the factory and probably have something to do with why the PO needed something else to hold it in place

DUDE! someone did not give a rats a$$ about preserving the condition of that stainless trim when removing it. Removing that trim is a PITA cuz the clips do not want to let go, they hold on for dear life. I tried for hours to avoid damaging my trim when I pulled mine off.

Those "divets" are from the clips. I could totally see that happening to me if I didn't take my time. I stepped back, had a beer & cautiously tried & tried until they let loose. Not fun...but either is the repair you now are faced with...

Here is that picture of the NAPA clips...less than $7 for 16 clips...not bad...I couldn't find the thread but I saved the pic cuz I will be heading over to buy some soon

imagejpg1_zps92e61d9a.jpg

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I have a similar one…definitely wasn't doing the trick. $10 bucks for that one…shot, ordering one now…thx

David

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Thanks Dave , that's them and use a can bottle opener and a small screw driver for a tool put a cloth between the metal or glass before prying it and be gentle. If your sending your stainless to be polished the metal finisher (if he is good) will straighten out the molding.

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Steve,

Which replacement clips (and part numbers) did you and up purchasing? Was it MR. G's part or did you end up going through NAPA? If so, were they a suitable replacement for the originals?

I'm about 6 months behind you for the re-installation of my rear window and I'd like to learn from your experience.

Thanks.

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Eric, I used the NAPA offerings, but haven't re-installed the window or moldings yet. They fit the nail-headed studs and are the correct size though.

Steve

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Do you have this tool? It releases the spring tension on the clip and the moldings lift right off.

http://www.nationaltoolwarehouse.com...FUVo7Aodl1sAYw

Ed, your link does not work.

If the tool you are talking about it this one

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/oes-25338?seid=srese1&gclid=CjwKEAjwwo2iBRCurdSQy9y8xWcSJABrrLiSGnXyIKp_3vg9gMS57l-twcorI6ch8cLA1wJaJBM7jhoCWfDw_wcB

One has to be careful to have an idea or feel just where the tip of this tool is when using it. When hunting for a clip under the trim and pulling on the tool, the tip of the tool can catch or strike the edge of the glass sending a big crack downward.

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Same tool.

I've never had any problems with this tool. I just lay the tool flat against the glass with the handle in a position so the tip of the tool is against the car body under the molding, slide it down until the tip of the tool catches the clip, then rotate the tool to release the spring tension in the clip. It might take a couple of tries to get a good idea how to catch the clip, but after that it's really quick.

Edited by RivNut (see edit history)

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