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1929Chrysler

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Everything posted by 1929Chrysler

  1. They are rare. I found one on E-bay about 8 years ago and bid on it, not having any idea whether it would work on my car or not. I won the bid at $250 and low and behold it was the right one for my car! I would imagine they are much more expensive today if you are lucky enough to find one.http://forums.aaca.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=86022&stc=1&d=1303497990
  2. The other vacuum line extending through the fire wall should be connected to your windshield wiper which works off of vacuum.
  3. Green Dragon... How do you know so much about this car? Are you from this area? The people at the museum were telling me they had to auction off a lot of the cars to pay for some debt which is a shame because apparently they had plans to expand.
  4. Went to the Crawford Auto Museum here in Cleveland today with my son's class on his field trip. I was blown away by the 1932 Peerless Prototype they have on display. It is a V-16 all aluminum engine, aluminum body, aluminum wheels. It is the only surviving prototype and the last car Peerless ever made. The chassis was made here in Cleveland and was driven to California with a temporary body on it. Once in California the permanent prototype body was made by a 22 year old named Hershey. (Any relation to Hershey PA?) The gentleman at the museum told me when the car was done the board of directors for Peerless knew that the car would be to expensive to produce and during those times very few people could afford to purchase the car and they also knew congress was about to repeal prohibition so they right then and there decided to get out of the auto industry and into the more profitable alcohol business. Peerless transformed itself over night. Ever hear of Black Label Beer? Basically the only real miles the car has on it are the ones that were driven to and from California for the body. They told me the car runs flawlessly and is a little tough to steer since it has no power steering. I was mesmerized looking at the car as it is a perfect time capsule from 1932. Absolutely no restoration. What a GORGEOUS car! After it was returned from California it was stored at the headquarters in Cleveland and hidden during WWII from being scraped. They told me it is valued at around 2 million dollars. Funny story they told me.. Some punk from the inner city had crossed the tape to get a "closer look" at the car and started touching all over it. The director of the museum seen this and went nuts! "Get the *&%! away from that car! Who the hell do you think you are?" I'm surprised they don't have it more protected than what it already is. I tried to post a video of the car below. I hope I did it right. If any one else knows more about the history, I sure would like to hear it! 1932 Peerless Prototype Touring Sedan on Vimeo
  5. To add to Jim's point. I would only try this process on knobs that you KNOW are plastic and I would be curious if any one out there would be willing to try it on old junk knobs made of unknown resins that are not made of plastic to see what happens.
  6. The mixture does NOT alter the plastic in any way. It only attacks the Bromine molecules within the original Brominated Flame Retardants that were added to the plastic when it was new. These Bromine molecules are vulnerable to ultra violet light and will turn "yellow" over time. The mixture/process reverses the yellowing and does nothing to the original plastic. You are assuming these knobs are from an automobile. They are not. The restoration project I am working on has knobs that were originally "white" and even if they weren't originally bright white the process would still restore the plastic to the original "off white" or "ivory" color of many automobile knobs without disturbing the original color of the plastic as outlined above.
  7. Possibly Apple Hydraulics??
  8. I found the answer to my question and I am EXTREMELY happy with the results. After searching the web I came across "The Retro Project" in which a process was by chance discovered in 2008 in a German Museum and later perfected by English chemists. It was originally believed that the yellow discoloration in white plastics with age is permanent. NOT SO!! With a simple solution of Hydrogen Peroxide and Oxy-Clean mixed together while letting the parts soak under the sun (ultraviolet light) for about 8 hours my parts came out brand spanking new!! I'm not kidding. These parts were actually just as white as the new plastic on my kids toy. Google The Retro Project and you'll see the process.
  9. I found the answer to my question and I am EXTREMELY happy with the results. After searching the web I came across "The Retro Project" in which a process was by chance discovered in 2008 in a German Museum and later perfected by English chemists. It was originally believed that the yellow discoloration in white plastics with age is permanent. NOT SO!! With a simple solution of Hydrogen Peroxide and Oxy-Clean mixed together while letting the parts soak under the sun (ultraviolet light) for about 8 hours my parts came out brand spanking new!! I'm not kidding. These parts were actually just as white as the new plastic on my kids toy. Google The Retro Project and you'll see the process.
  10. Any ideas on how to whiten old knobs that have turned yellow over the years? Presumably it is plastic from the 60's. Thank you in advance.
  11. Any ideas on how to whiten Knobs that have turned yellow over the years? Presumably it is plastic from the 60's. Thank you in advance.
  12. Tom.. How do I go about getting a build record for my car? Thanks
  13. Phil.. When I was a 16 year old kid I bought my '29 from my mother. My dad originally owned the car and he passed away years earlier. The car was just sitting in the garage. Anyway, after I bought it from my mom I became ambitious and decided to restore the wood wheels. Like most immature kids, I became frustrated and impatient with the stripping process so I decided to "SAND BLAST" the wood wheels. SURPRISINGLY, I did NOT damage the wood!! It did a hell of a job removing the paint and cleaned the wood beautifully. It took multiple coats of finish to fill in the pores of the grain but as I look at it today (24 yeas later) they are absolutely gorgeous. Not bad for a kid who didn't know what the hell he was doing!! I don't know if I was lucky or what but today I don't think I would do it and if I did, it would be with the much milder media you described.
  14. I'm working on a wood wheel restoration project with my kids trying to spark their interest in the antique hobby. (Extra wheel we plan on displaying on the wall when we are done) I completely disassembled the the spokes from the rim and stripped the paint down to bear wood. Plan on powder coating the metal rims and finishing the spokes natural with Spar varnish as it will expand and contract with wood. Multiple coats of the Spar varnish with sanding and rubbing out the varnish when complete should produce a nice finish. Seems like disassembly of the wheel is a lot easier than tapping and trying to sand in the nooks and cranny's of each spoke. With it disassembled we can concentrate on each individual spoke easier than if it was still assembled. We've got about 4 hours of stripping and an estimated time of about 5-6 hours of finishing and rubbing and buffing. I like the natural finish of the wood wheels because it strikes interest with people. They say "WOW, you mean they were actually WOOD wheels!?" Which leads to my question. How many cars of the 20's were actually offered with the natural wood finish? Dan
  15. Thanks windjammer. He painted the guitar multiple times when he was a kid so any originality is out the window. We did check. No tuners are available so we have to try and salvage what we have. Any ideas? Thanks
  16. Kind of off topic from cars but hoping I could get some input. We are restoring my brothers vintage guitar from when he was a kid for his surprise 50th birthday party this summer. The tuner mechanism is either nickel or bright chrome that is badly rusted. The problem is that the knobs where you turn to adjust the guitar strings are either plastic or bakelite and do not come off. Any ideas or suggestions on how to proceed? Thank You in advance!
  17. Fascinating video! Thank you for sharing.
  18. Looking for any helpful suggestions. I had my stromberg U2 carb replaced a few years ago with a rebuilt carter bb1. Since then, I would barely touch the starter pedal and she would fire up immediately. Recently, it has been really hard to start. When choked, gas drips from the carb so I know it's getting there. after a lot of cranking and waiting she finally starts and then runs flawlessly. it's getting her to fire up when she cold. I do have a Kingston natural gravity canister. Any thoughts? Thank you in advance. Dan
  19. I don't know about American Honeycomb's services other than they get their cores made over seas. If you need a repair on your radiator, I would recommend Bill Lemaster in Chilicothe Ill. He is a retired expert on these old radiators who still works on them in his home. (309)645-0606. If you want a modern radiator with a false Honeycomb front, then I would contact Carnegie Manufacturing in PA. If you are in need of an authentic Honeycomb core I would buy direct from England. vintagecarradiatorcompany.co.uk Dan
  20. Would you know about the 1929 model 65 as well? Any help would be greatly appreciated Dan
  21. I have an Optima 6 volt battery. What are your recommendations for proper storage in winter months? I used to remove the battery and put it in my basement for room temperature storage but recently I was told it is better to leave outside in the cold. Comments anyone?? What type of charging?? Thanks in advance. Dan
  22. very interesting and good information.
  23. Try wet sanding the original top coat that is flaking off of the base while being careful not to cut into the original wood grain. If it works then top coat it with a polyurethane to protect. Worst case scenario is it would all have to be re-done anyway. Dan
  24. After doing much research and speaking with reputable people who actually have vast experience in brake hydraulics, particularly Apple Hydraulics, I have drawn the conclusion that silicone brake fluid is perfectly OK to use as long as two issues are dealt with up front. The 1st thing is that if you are converting from Dot 3 to silicone, there can be no trace elements of the old Dot 3 in the system. I believe even with a good flushing with alcohol you can't remove everything. Dot 3 and Dot 5 are not interchangeable and when mixed together turns into a big mess with certain brake failure to follow. In my opinion, if you are going to change over to silicone, your system should be brand new with every thing replaced so that there can be no possibility of mixing the two. The 2nd thing that appears to be a common denominator with silicone problems is the use of cheaper silicone brake fluids. According to Apple Hydraulics, the majority of brake seal failures seem to come from the cheaper stuff. NAPA has been named a lot as a problem silicone fluid. Brake fluids have swelling agents that help the rubber to swell slightly enough to give a good seal. Seems as though the swelling agents in the cheaper fluid tend to attack certain seals and make them soft and "gummy" rendering their sealing properties non existent over time. A good quality silicone fluid would be "Cartel" as named by Desoto Frank. Their slogan is "Finally One That Works". I have been using it for a few years now with no problems. Until some one with some type of engineering background can give scientific reasoning as to why silicone should not be used, I am ready to put this silicone bashing to bed once and for all. Dan
  25. Forgot to mention, the Plymouth piston has four rings, one more than the original '29 Chrysler if memory serves me correctly. Dan
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