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1929Chrysler

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About 1929Chrysler

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  1. They are rare. I found one on E-bay about 8 years ago and bid on it, not having any idea whether it would work on my car or not. I won the bid at $250 and low and behold it was the right one for my car! I would imagine they are much more expensive today if you are lucky enough to find one.http://forums.aaca.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=86022&stc=1&d=1303497990
  2. The other vacuum line extending through the fire wall should be connected to your windshield wiper which works off of vacuum.
  3. Green Dragon... How do you know so much about this car? Are you from this area? The people at the museum were telling me they had to auction off a lot of the cars to pay for some debt which is a shame because apparently they had plans to expand.
  4. Went to the Crawford Auto Museum here in Cleveland today with my son's class on his field trip. I was blown away by the 1932 Peerless Prototype they have on display. It is a V-16 all aluminum engine, aluminum body, aluminum wheels. It is the only surviving prototype and the last car Peerless ever made. The chassis was made here in Cleveland and was driven to California with a temporary body on it. Once in California the permanent prototype body was made by a 22 year old named Hershey. (Any relation to Hershey PA?) The gentleman at the museum told me when the car was done the board of directors
  5. To add to Jim's point. I would only try this process on knobs that you KNOW are plastic and I would be curious if any one out there would be willing to try it on old junk knobs made of unknown resins that are not made of plastic to see what happens.
  6. The mixture does NOT alter the plastic in any way. It only attacks the Bromine molecules within the original Brominated Flame Retardants that were added to the plastic when it was new. These Bromine molecules are vulnerable to ultra violet light and will turn "yellow" over time. The mixture/process reverses the yellowing and does nothing to the original plastic. You are assuming these knobs are from an automobile. They are not. The restoration project I am working on has knobs that were originally "white" and even if they weren't originally bright white the process would still restore the plas
  7. Possibly Apple Hydraulics??
  8. I found the answer to my question and I am EXTREMELY happy with the results. After searching the web I came across "The Retro Project" in which a process was by chance discovered in 2008 in a German Museum and later perfected by English chemists. It was originally believed that the yellow discoloration in white plastics with age is permanent. NOT SO!! With a simple solution of Hydrogen Peroxide and Oxy-Clean mixed together while letting the parts soak under the sun (ultraviolet light) for about 8 hours my parts came out brand spanking new!! I'm not kidding. These parts were actually just as wh
  9. I found the answer to my question and I am EXTREMELY happy with the results. After searching the web I came across "The Retro Project" in which a process was by chance discovered in 2008 in a German Museum and later perfected by English chemists. It was originally believed that the yellow discoloration in white plastics with age is permanent. NOT SO!! With a simple solution of Hydrogen Peroxide and Oxy-Clean mixed together while letting the parts soak under the sun (ultraviolet light) for about 8 hours my parts came out brand spanking new!! I'm not kidding. These parts were actually just as wh
  10. Any ideas on how to whiten old knobs that have turned yellow over the years? Presumably it is plastic from the 60's. Thank you in advance.
  11. Any ideas on how to whiten Knobs that have turned yellow over the years? Presumably it is plastic from the 60's. Thank you in advance.
  12. Tom.. How do I go about getting a build record for my car? Thanks
  13. Phil.. When I was a 16 year old kid I bought my '29 from my mother. My dad originally owned the car and he passed away years earlier. The car was just sitting in the garage. Anyway, after I bought it from my mom I became ambitious and decided to restore the wood wheels. Like most immature kids, I became frustrated and impatient with the stripping process so I decided to "SAND BLAST" the wood wheels. SURPRISINGLY, I did NOT damage the wood!! It did a hell of a job removing the paint and cleaned the wood beautifully. It took multiple coats of finish to fill in the pores of the grain but as I loo
  14. I'm working on a wood wheel restoration project with my kids trying to spark their interest in the antique hobby. (Extra wheel we plan on displaying on the wall when we are done) I completely disassembled the the spokes from the rim and stripped the paint down to bear wood. Plan on powder coating the metal rims and finishing the spokes natural with Spar varnish as it will expand and contract with wood. Multiple coats of the Spar varnish with sanding and rubbing out the varnish when complete should produce a nice finish. Seems like disassembly of the wheel is a lot easier than tapping and tryin
  15. Thanks windjammer. He painted the guitar multiple times when he was a kid so any originality is out the window. We did check. No tuners are available so we have to try and salvage what we have. Any ideas? Thanks
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