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Hello everyone!

 

I have a 1931, 60. On this there are closed rims. I've seen pictures of this car with wood rims, spoke rims and open steel rims.

 

What were the options on the car when it was new? Can I switch between the different rims or do this require a conversion?

 

 

Best regards,

Stian Oland, Norway

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The rims (the part the tires mount on) are split rims with a locking ring.  The wheels in the picture are steel disc wheels, also available would be wire spokes and wood spoke artillery type wheels. The hubs are likely different between the artillery wheels and the others.  I am not conversant enough with Buick to give you a detailed description of the differences but someone here certainly will.  Your parts book should tell you what you need to know.

Neat looking project.  I wish you well.

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Stian:

 Yes there were many options for wheels in 1931. Most prefer the wire wheel option. But the steel disk wheels you have are very rare to find on these cars in the USA. When painted and properly striped to me they look as impressive as the ones on a Packard. 

DSCF2461.JPG.740850385c7987a9372b02e5542daf5a.JPG

Bill McLaughlin's 1929 Roadster on the 2013 Pre-War after tour.

 

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Steel disk wheels are very much easier to look after and keep clean!

 

I thought split rims were the removable type you split and collapse to remove a tire. The wheels shown I would call locking ring or side ring rims.

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2 hours ago, Spinneyhill said:

Steel disk wheels are very much easier to look after and keep clean!

 

I thought split rims were the removable type you split and collapse to remove a tire. The wheels shown I would call locking ring or side ring rims.

 

Yes, the lock ring type is the easiest to change a tyre on. Take the wheel off and lay it on the ground, jump on the tyre to break the bead, remove the lock ring and then take the tyre  and tube off and either repair or replace, pop it all back together and pump it up. No special tools. The Kelsey-Hayes wires on the 1929 Studebaker are this type.

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3 hours ago, nzcarnerd said:

pop it all back together and pump it up. No special tools.

But be VERY careful when you pump it up. They should be restrained in case the side ring flies off. It will seriously damage anyone standing there. Trucks, landcruiser, early Hilux etc wheels were like this and they were blown up in a cage.

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9 hours ago, Spinneyhill said:

But be VERY careful when you pump it up. They should be restrained in case the side ring flies off. It will seriously damage anyone standing there. Trucks, landcruiser, early Hilux etc wheels were like this and they were blown up in a cage.

 

Except of course that you don't use anywhere near the pressure the trucks use. 30-35 psi for the Stude.

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18 hours ago, Spinneyhill said:

The wheels shown I would call locking ring or side ring rims.

In 1931 Buick used split demountable rims.

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On ‎6‎/‎7‎/‎2018 at 11:05 PM, Renascence said:

All three type of hub wheels will fit and work on your car.

I think this may not be true.  Wood and wire metal have different hubs, as far as I know.

 

John

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A line up of 1929 wheel styles at the Denver MeetDSCF6845.thumb.JPG.667b008db973c8749cdbe50516bce82c.JPG

Disk, artillery, wire.

DSCF6876.thumb.JPG.f0d4f0b075ecf6d7f9a0fb4ccf519b70.JPG

The second and 4th from the left have regular wood spoke wheels.

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