m-mman

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About m-mman

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  • Birthday 03/11/1958
  1. Pierce Arrow 'streamlined' ??? No, that's not what the headlights were all about. In 1913 even airplanes were hardly streamlined. They were for better illumination (and yes brand identification) Read more about it here http://www.pierce-arrow.org/features/feature27/index.php As for the original topic - custom bodies on low priced chassis- No one has mentioned that the bodies seem to have more 'Classic" status than the chassis. Consider that this Plymouth is a Classic and a Rolls Royce made into a flat bed truck is not. A Model L Lincoln made into a tow truck (as the factory recommended that its dealers do) is not displayable as a Classic. . .
  2. Glass jar application...

    This type of triangular washer fluid bottle was standard equipment under the hood of every 1966 full size Mercury.
  3. Hummmmm . . . Thanks. The late teens and early twenties is an unfamiliar to me.
  4. I am thinking that you are correct. This just might be "The Most Beautiful Car in America". . . . The use of Bowl headlights during the time when others were using drums, adds to the suspicion. I will attribute the vertical windshield to a modification made to accommodate the accessory solid top.
  5. I am thinking this has a GM look to it, Buick came to mind, but the radiator to cowl is completely straight. No outside handles, space between doors (7 pass?) Is that thing on the running board in front of the rear wheel a light or a suspension/spring access point? The solid top might be a "Detroit Weatherproof"
  6. Great Classic Sedans

    Opps! you are correct. This is what happens when you try to find an image while you are at work. While the scan is not the best, here is the interior of a 1927 P1 town car by Clark of Wolverhampton commissioned by a director of Woolworths. This interior would never appear in an open car. And the original broad lace over mohair in my basic Fisher body 1929 Cad town sedan.
  7. 1926? Cadillac

    Correct this is a 1928 Cadillac 341A. The 1929 341B had lights on the fender. Cadillac (And LaSalle) models used their CID as the model indicator. The letters indicated the year from first production. Most V-8 CID changed within 2 years so there is generally only an A & B model, however the V-12 (370) and the V-16 (452) had models 370A, through E . The 452 also ran from model 452A through E. Eventually Cad advertising promoted their famous "V-8, V-12, V-16" tag lines and the model 'numbers' faded away.
  8. Great Classic Sedans

    I am an admirer of a great sedan also. It was the target body style for a Classic era buyer. I feel that a great sedan is as much about the interior as the exterior. Open cars look sporty but a closed car has to transmit a certain comfort or elegant to its occupants sitting inside. Sadly interiors dont seem to receive the appreciation and photo documentation they deserve. Trimming an open car in smooth hides seems to be lacking in creativity. While a closed car is a display board for rolls, pleats, cubby holes, map pockets, arm rests, etc. (yes some of these existed on open cars) as well as the use of things like broad lace or other embroidery. A closed car is where the art of the trimmer really shines. Does anybody have preferences between; wool? or mohair? Bedford cord? (maybe exotic furs?) You might kick your shoes off in the back of a closed car, but not an open car. Were mouton carpets used during the classic era? (dont know that I have seen them) What about full leather interiors in closed Classics? Leather is the reflexive indicator of 'luxury' today, but it always seems out of place on an authentic closed Full Classic. The cabinetry is another place to admire a quality closed Classic.
  9. Need car ID, photo dated August 1950

    And the name 'green jalopy' suggest that it was painted "Sportsmen Green". A very bright color (chartreuse) color that everyone who saw it would have remembered.
  10. I totally agree. I am working to get them turned around but the museum isnt ready to do that yet, and since its not my car . . . . This is again further reason to research the car and hopefully come up with a photo of when it was new.
  11. I have posted this in the CCCA area but perhaps some Plymouth experts can add something (anything?) Plymouth is not a name that is normally associated with the CCCA term Full Classic. There is however a single Plymouth that has been awarded this coveted designation and I am asking if anyone can assist in adding to its factual history which may or may not support its rumored history. There exists today at the Automobile Driving Museum in El Segundo, California a 1932 Plymouth PB that is carrying a Brewster town car body. It's condition is a combination of a restored exterior and largely original interior. Plymouths were recognized for durability and quality engineering (4 wheel hydraulic brakes in 1928) but never for status. The Brewster Plymouth shows serial number 1741417 and a (Briggs) Body number 537-1963. 1932 Plymouth numbers ranged from 1680001 to 1758001 and production ran from February to September of 1932, so it is likely that this car was assembled around July or August of 1932. This Plymouth has the longer 121” wheelbase that was used for Plymouth 7 passenger cars. (standard wheelbase being 112”) For 1932 Plymouth used a 4-cylinder engine of 65 horsepower and a ‘Silver Dome’ head. The cylinder head on this Brewster Plymouth has been chromed but the under hood otherwise appears stock 32 Plymouth. In 1932 Plymouth did build great cars, but the bigger question is how did this one end up with a Brewster body? 1932 was a down time in the American economy and things were especially bad at Rolls Royce of America and Brewster (which was owned by RR of America) They were assembling Phantom I’s from parts leftover in the Springfield factory and they were importing a few Phantom IIs from England. Information suggests that their main income came from repair, maintenance and refitting existing bodies to another chassis. In an effort to not have the Rolls Royce name pass through the inevitable bankruptcy, the organization was renamed the Springfield Manufacturing Corporation. John Inskip became president and by 1934 they were producing the well-known Brewster Fords with their heart shaped grilles. I am working to sort out the actual history of the Brewster-Plymouth for the museum. It was granted it’s Full Classic status in 2007. This Plymouth has been known in car circles for many years but its history seems to be based more on rumors and very little on actual documentation. Stories are that it was owned by James Melton in 1953 and later Leo Gephart when Melton’s collection was liquidated. It was subsequently offered at many an auction and sales over the years and each offering meant there was the opportunity to try to enhance its historical value with unsubstantiated tales. It is now time to add some documentation and certainty to what is currently just possibly true. Does anyone in the Plymouth/Mopar world have or know any documentation or have any period photos concerning this car? I have found information related to the RRs produced at this time, but do any Brewster body records from 1932 exist anywhere? I have not been able to find a Brewster body number on the car. Are there any Brewster experts out there who can direct me where to look? It is possible that the Brewster body had been removed from an older car and remounted on the Plymouth. How might one determine this? Is it possible that during 1932 RR/Brewster was experimenting with using quality bodies on a low-priced chassis and this Plymouth is the original 'proof of concept' for what became the later Brewster-Fords? This car has been linked with Eleanor Roosevelt but again no firm documentation has yet been found. The FDR library claims no knowledge of the car. Was she the owner? Was it something she just used? In 1932 Eleanor was the wife of the Governor of New York State. By March of 1933 Eleanor was the First Lady of the United States, it does not seem likely that during this time she would need to be the owner of a Plymouth Town Car. Could it have been owned at this time by the State of New York or the Federal government? A photograph does exist of Eleanor sitting in a new 1933 Plymouth convertible coupe, but for her famous 3 week road trip in the summer of 1933, she drove a new Buick convertible. It has been insinuated that perhaps Franklin Roosevelt used the car at his Warm Springs Georgia resort. Warm Springs was a vacation type destination. It was a casual place. It is well known that FDR kept a 1932 Plymouth phaeton equipped with hand controls there and liked to drive it fast on the dirt roads of the area. The casual, recreational aspect of Warm Springs does not seem to be the setting for a formal town car. Whatever it's history, the car is a special artifact. But as the only Full Classic Plymouth it deserves to have its past based on better quality research than currently exists. If you can add to any of the above information or even point me toward an archive, please do so. If you would like to see this unusual Classic for yourself, please stop by the Automobile Driving Museum when you are in El Segundo, California.
  12. I absolutely agree! The base Plymouth chassis seems really out of place. I think that it was as out of place then, as it seems today. However. . . WHY?? "Lipstick on a pig" perhaps, but in this case somebody actually did it! WHY? That's what I would love to get to the bottom of. (always history first) I heard the story of a wealthy person/family that had a coach-built town car body mounted on a Model T chassis because their chauffeur couldn't drive anything else. (wow! what devotion to your employees) Truth or urban legend, it does explain how that vehicle happened. During the depression there certainly was class envy and wealth animosity and perhaps having a Plymouth would be a way to try to connect with the masses? If it can be rooted out and documented, the story of how a Brewster body ended up on a 1932 Plymouth will be historically more interesting and illustrative of the Classic era than how a one off coach-built body ended up on a large multi cylinder chassis.
  13. Plymouth is not a name that is normally associated with the term Full Classic. There is however a single Plymouth that has been awarded this coveted designation and I am asking if anyone can assist in adding to its factual history which may or may not support its rumored history. There exists today at the Automobile Driving Museum in El Segundo, California a 1932 Plymouth PB that is carrying a Brewster town car body. It's condition is a combination of a restored exterior and largely original interior. Plymouths were recognized for durability and quality engineering (4 wheel hydraulic brakes in 1928) but never for status. The Brewster Plymouth shows serial number 1741417 and a (Briggs) Body number 537-1963. 1932 Plymouth numbers ranged from 1680001 to 1758001 and production ran from February to September of 1932, so it is likely that this car was assembled around July or August of 1932. This Plymouth has the longer 121” wheelbase that was used for Plymouth 7 passenger cars. (standard wheelbase being 112”) For 1932 Plymouth used a 4-cylinder engine of 65 horsepower and a ‘Silver Dome’ head. The cylinder head on this Brewster Plymouth has been chromed but the under hood otherwise appears stock 32 Plymouth. In 1932 Plymouth did build great cars, but the bigger question is how did this one end up with a Brewster body? 1932 was a down time in the American economy and things were especially bad at Rolls Royce of America and Brewster (which was owned by RR of America) They were assembling Phantom I’s from parts leftover in the Springfield factory and they were importing a few Phantom IIs from England. Information suggests that their main income came from repair, maintenance and refitting existing bodies to another chassis. In an effort to not have the Rolls Royce name pass through the inevitable bankruptcy, the organization was renamed the Springfield Manufacturing Corporation. John Inskip became president and by 1934 they were producing the well-known Brewster Fords with their heart shaped grilles. I am working to sort out the actual history of the Brewster-Plymouth for the museum. It was granted it’s Full Classic status in 2007. This Plymouth has been known in car circles for many years but its history seems to be based more on rumors and very little on actual documentation. Stories are that it was owned by James Melton in 1953 and later Leo Gephart when Melton’s collection was liquidated. It was subsequently offered at many an auction and sales over the years and each offering meant there was the opportunity to try to enhance its historical value with unsubstantiated tales. It is now time to add some documentation and certainty to what is currently just possibly true. Does anyone in the Classic Car world have or know any documentation or have any period photos concerning this car? I have found information related to the RRs produced at this time, but do any Brewster body records from 1932 exist anywhere? I have not been able to find a Brewster body number on the car. Are there any Brewster experts out there who can direct me where to look? It is possible that the Brewster body had been removed from an older car and remounted on the Plymouth. How might one determine this? Is it possible that during 1932 RR/Brewster was experimenting with using quality bodies on a low-priced chassis and this Plymouth is the original 'proof of concept' for what became the later Brewster-Fords? This car has been linked with Eleanor Roosevelt but again no firm documentation has yet been found. The FDR library claims no knowledge of the car. Was she the owner? Was it something she just used? In 1932 Eleanor was the wife of the Governor of New York State. By March of 1933 Eleanor was the First Lady of the United States, it does not seem likely that during this time she would need to be the owner of a Plymouth Town Car. Could it have been owned at this time by the State of New York or the Federal government? A photograph does exist of Eleanor sitting in a new 1933 Plymouth convertible coupe, but for her famous 3 week road trip in the summer of 1933, she drove a new Buick convertible. It has been insinuated that perhaps Franklin Roosevelt used the car at his Warm Springs Georgia resort. Warm Springs was a vacation type destination. It was a casual place. It is well known that FDR kept a 1932 Plymouth phaeton equipped with hand controls there and liked to drive it fast on the dirt roads of the area. The casual, recreational aspect of Warm Springs does not seem to be the setting for a formal town car. Whatever it's history, the car is a special artifact. But as the only Full Classic Plymouth it deserves to have its past based on better quality research than currently exists. If you can add to any of the above information or even point me toward an archive, please do so. If you would like to see this unusual Classic for yourself, please stop by the Automobile Driving Museum when you are in El Segundo, California.
  14. The car: 1929 Cad Town Sedan equipped with buffalo wire wheels. I have the Buffalo tool and have removed the wheels, and now I want to remove the drum & bearing. BUT HOW?Do you remove the 12 nuts that are against the drum? Are they locked studs or free turning bolts?Do you remove the 'dust cover'? Does it unscrew? And what is the little nut/stud next to it for? does it lock it somehow? I have included picturesI am starting with the fronts, but if there is anything you can tell me about what I will find on the rears I would also be grateful.
  15. The car: 1929 Cadillac Town Sedan equipped with buffalo wire wheels. I have the Buffalo tool and have removed the wheels, and now I want to remove the drum & bearing. BUT HOW?Do you remove the 12 nuts that are against the drum? Are they locked studs or free turning bolts?Do you remove the 'dust cover'? Does it unscrew? And what is the little nut/stud next to it for? does it lock it somehow? I have included picturesI am starting with the fronts, but if there is anything you can tell me about what I will find on the rears I would also be grateful.