TampaRiv

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  1. Wow, thanks for the support Ed. I was absolutely convinced some joker would chime in and tell me I'm an idiot who doesn't know what I'm doing, and tell me how to do it!
  2. Hello lads, greetings from balmy Tampa, I ordered an 8-piece set of window weatherstrips for my '63 Riv from our friends in NJ, about 92 bucks. They look OK, but came with no usable instructions. But I've done them on my '65 Skylark, so I thought it would be relatively easy and possibly enjoyable. NOT! I started with the front RH outer piece, which, is NOT a piece of rubber that would seal against the glass and keep rain out. No, it's a fuzzy strip, more like what you'd expect to be on the inside of the glass. Long story short, only 2 of the 3 holes lined up, and only the aft-most screw was possible to attach....the glass was in the way, and it was impossible to insert the supplied screws and drive them with a screwdriver. AND, it was a bitch to get the old piece of weatherstrip out, as it was stapled to the trim piece. Maddening. Next, I studied the inner front piece (which has rubber weatherstrip, ironically), and concluded that the only way to replace this piece was to have the inner door card (panel) removed. I think that removing the inner door cars requires removing the outer door skin....am I right? Plus, the weatherstrip piece is riveted to the door card bolster, and tucks in under the vent window assembly, so man-o-man, it just seems impossible short of a full-on dismantling of the doors. The rear windows seem easier, as the glass gets out of the way. My question: suppose you disassemble the doors completely, fit the new weatherstripping, put it all back together, and damn! the windows aren't lined up correctly to as to make exact contact with the weatherstripping?? Then you are again disassembling the outer door panel, messing with the window tracks to achieve proper alignment, and re-assembling again to check your work. It's insane. My conclusions are as follows: *Buick's weatherstripping engineering from the era was not too good. *Aftermarket weatherstripping is currently not that good either. *Unless you are doing a full-blown restoration, don't bother trying to replace the window weatherstripping.....even if you get it installed without hanging yourself in the garage, it isn't likely to keep water out of the doors. I have gotten into the habit of blue-taping the window openings before I wash the car to keep excess water out, and so even after I get the new pieces installed, I will still need to do that. Cheers gents, Rich in Tampa
  3. Hello guys from steamy Tampa. I re-painted my door jambs on the '63 Riv this weekend, and then today I got the passenger side door seal (weatherstrip) installed. I bought it from the guys over in NJ, and the piece seemed like first-quality, everything lined up great. Before I installed the weatherstrip, and with the jamb keeper removed, and the old crusty weatherstrip gone, the door fit great...not binding anywhere, all panel lines and margins were very good. BUT, with the new weatherstrip installed (a very nice and accurate job I might add), the door really has a hard time closing. I mean, it's like the old VWs from the 60s, which would allow the car to float! With an overly-firm close, the door will shut, and and the door fits nice with the body. MY QUESTIONS: *Can I expect the weatherstrip to ease up and settle in/compress, allowing the door to close more easily? *Has anyone done this to their cars, and did you experience the same issue? *I could adjust the striker/keeper to allow for an easier close, but then the door wouldn't sit as flush with the body as it does now. Any advice would be appreciated. It makes me wonder how tight the weatherstrip was when the cars left the factory. Cheers, Rich in Tampa
  4. Hello Gents, it's Rich here in sweltering Tampa. I was up in Columbus for a couple of months working over the summer, and now I'm back in FL, resuming work on the '63 Teal Mist. One sidetrack that occurred up in Ohio is that I "rescued" another car, a '67 Chrysler Newport Custom. I'd seen the car last year on the street, but didn't think to inquire about it. Then, this year, I saw it again, so I ended up putting a note on the car, and ultimately bought the car for just $1250. I then proceeded to recommission the old Mopar in much the same way as I did the Riviera...lots of new engine bolt-on parts, new brakes and tires etc. etc. So here are a couple of photos of the old barge. I like big boats and I cannot lie!
  5. Hello Gents, it's Rich here in sweltering Tampa. I was up in Columbus for a couple of months working over the summer, and now I'm back in FL, resuming work on the '63 Teal Mist. One sidetrack that occurred up in Ohio is that I "rescued" another car, a '67 Chrysler Newport Custom. I'd seen the car last year on the street, but didn't think to inquire about it. Then, this year, I saw it again, so I ended up putting a note on the car, and ultimately bought the car for just $1250. I then proceeded to recommission the old Mopar in much the same way as I did the Riviera...lots of new engine bolt-on parts, new brakes and tires etc. etc. So here are a couple of photos of the old barge. I like big boats and I cannot lie!
  6. Where are you at in Ohio Gary? I was just up in Columbus for a couple of months this summer, I've lived all my life up there except for the last 4 years here in Tampa. I had to leave my Riv here in FL, and wanted to keep working on it, but it didn't make sense to transport it up/back to OH. BUT, like the car-obsessed doofus that I am, I acquired a 67 Newport up there, and am now recommissioning that old boat!
  7. Hello gents, I'm writing from Columbus instead of Tampa, as I'm up north for a couple of months visiting friends and family and working for clients up here. Columbus is a great town, and getting bigger and busier like every place else it seems. My question tonight is about Vintage Air Systems for use in the Riviera, specifically my '63. I have seen several of these units lately in a variety of cars from a '67 C10 Pickup, to today's sighting in a '67 Healey 3000. My questions are: Do they work well? Are they easy enough to install that a layman can do it? (By layman I mean a guy who has a high degree of mechanical skill and troubleshooting talent, but not a lick of AC experience). Can the original Riv ductwork and controls be adapted? Tampa is great from Nov. 1st to June 1st, but it's hotter than shit in June-Oct, so the AC is a must. I would be glad to hear your stories of the Vintage Air products, and particularly which set-up is right for the Riviera. Finally, I bought yet another car today, a 1967 Chrysler Newport 2-door hardtop. I stole the car, and it is really nice. Some sorting will need to be done of course, but that should be fun, and, there's a Mopar section to this website so hopefully those guys will be as helpful as you chaps here in the Riv section. Amazingly, the '67 Newport coupe is actually longer than the '63 Riviera....The Riv is 17 feet 3 inches (correct me if that's wrong), and the Newport comes in at an even 18 feet! It's a 2-door! Insane. Oh, and some research on the interweb told me that the slab-sided Chryslers were designed by a guy who left Ford after designing the '61 Continental. Cheers from Buckeye-land Rich
  8. Thanks Keiser for the useful info. I appreciate all the comments and the help.
  9. Thanks for the info fellas, I plan to pick the car up tomorrow morning, and take it to my buddy's shop for some cleaning and maybe try to figure out the electrical issue. My whiz-kid friend is on a motorcycle trip to the BMW gathering, so it may not be until next weekend when he can help me sort that electrical problem. But it will be fun to clean the car up and get myself familiar with it. I still can't find the camera.... Rich
  10. Can somebody tell me where the Newport Custom fits in to the Chrysler lineup in '67? I assume the Imperial was the top-dog model, and the New Yorker was below the Imperial. Was the Newport the entry car for Chrysler? What did the "Custom" designation include? Was the Newport Custom better equipped than the Monaco (which I know was a Dodge)? Just trying to educate myself about Mopars. Thanks! Rich
  11. Many thanks for your post Craig. The plan is to have the owner locate the title, then tow the car to a friend's shop here in Columbus so I can start to sort through it. I may need some stuff while I'm up here in Ohio, so I'll be sure to give you a call. Come August I will probably trailer the car down to Tampa, and will need stuff once I start working on it down there. Thanks again for the post, I really appreciate the interest and support. Rich PS, I do not have one of those infernal I-phones, and don't care if I ever do. SO, when I locate my digital camera, I'll get some photos of the car and post them. Thanks again.
  12. Hey Jack, I bought the car. The guy just couldn't keep it any more, he had some health issues. He said he had started it just last week, but there wasn't anything at the key...no crank. He had put a voltage regulator and coil on it recently, and it did start and run, but there appears to be some electrical gremlin he hasn't found yet. We agreed on $1250. The interior is quite nice, except for the driver's seat back. The body seems pretty solid, and the underside looked decent from what I could see. Floors and quarters look good, and rockers too. So, I'll tow it down to the shop this weekend and see if we can get the old 383 running. If I can find my camera I'll post some photos. Cheers, Rich
  13. Thanks Jack. I could see that the Newport would be a good complement to my Riviera...big floaty Detroit cars. I plan to leave a note on the car this evening, so I'll let you know if anything comes of it. Thanks again from Columbus, Rich (from Tampa) If olive oil comes from olives, and vegetable oil comes from vegetables, where does baby oil come from?
  14. Hello Mopar fans, I normally post with the Riviera group (I just bought a '63 Riv on March 1st, and after a 27-year dormancy, It's on the road again!). It's a "rolling restoration", and my wife and I are loving it. But I do have an affliction, so now I have my eye on a '67 Newport Custom that has been basically sitting on the street, not really moving much, and I want it. I come up from Florida to Ohio in the summers, and this red '67 Newport has been sitting on the street for at least 2 years. It changes position, and has good plates, but the tires are low and I'm thinking of leaving a note on the car to see if the owner would sell. I can't detect much (if any) rust on the body panels. One spot on the black vinyl roof is bubbling. The car is red, not sure if it's a factory color. Interior is nice. But it's just sitting on a busy street (amazing it hasn't been hit yet), and it just seems like the owner has no good place to keep it. Anyhow, the car really has my interest, so I'd ask you fellows for any advice about this model. I've owned a half-dozen A-body Darts, and my Dad had a '66 Monaco, but I have no experience with the Newport. Thanks for any help, I appreciate it!