Jump to content

Wood - Who, what, where and how much!


RoadsterRich
 Share

Recommended Posts

Back to the 1930 Chrysler 77 Roadster again, continuing in my never ending list of needs in getting the car back on the road...<P>I knew I had wood damage, but not the extent. Looks like the entire rear end wood in the car, and the door posts are going to need replaced. Termites did a neat job, most of the wood (whats left of the wood) looks really good from the outside. Touch it, and it is like paper. For the structural parts I believe I can salvage enough for patterns. The floor boards for the rumble seat section are gone, as are I believe a couple of other non support pieces. Also the wood that goes on the iron stays for the convertible top is gone. Also all of the wood for the seats, except the bottom of the rumble seat are gone. This project just keeps getting bigger.<P>Now for the real question, where would I find someone to make the wood for me? And how much should one expect to pay for the wood? Or is this something I with my somewhat limited woodworking skills can have a go at? (I have tools, table saw, router, radial arm saw, jig saw, circular saw, band saw, drill press, various planes. I am just more of a wood working tinkerer, no experience at something this complex).<P>Might there be someone nearby? I live in Melbourne, Florida, near where the space shuttle's launch at, and not too far from Orlando, home of Mickey & Minnie.<P>Thanks,<P>Rich

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bull pucky! Mickey and Minnie came from Anaheim, CA. That upstart place near Orlando ain't their home grin.gif" border="0 <P>Let me tell you from experience, woodwork is darned expensive, especially if you find a perfectionist. Sounds like you have most of the right tools. I say try a few pieces to find out if you feel comfortable with the work.<P>Ralph Harms, the fellow whose obit you may have read in the Jan-Feb AA, once told me he didn't know much about woodwork, but when I visited him a few years ago he was doing a mighty fine job on a T&C. wink.gif" border="0

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ron,<P>Nah, Minnie and Mickey were from Anaheim, but they built a liesure years home in Orlando and moved down here to be near the retiree's, besides they say Goofy felt at home here. wink.gif" border="0<P>My folks tell me the problem with my woodwork is I am a perfectionist and neither I or the wood are perfect to start with.<P>Would there be any value other than my own obessiveness with putting the pieces into CAD (Computer Aided Design) and making them available to others?<P>I will ponder doing the work myself. Even if (and it is a big if) I decide to try, I'd like to know what to expect, and who might be able to do the work, or even do the parts I cannot.<P>Thanks,<P>Rich

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rich,<P>There is a gentleman by the name of Les Stinson in Summerdale Alabama that does some beautiful work on wood. He is doing the wood on my car and I was very impressed from the woodies I saw him do. I checked references closely too. He is 50 miles from Penesocola.<BR>(334) 989-2357<P>There is also Erik Johnson at Treehouse Woods over in Cocoa Beach. That should be close enough so you could see his work.<BR>(407) 783-6781<P>There are more wood resources on the Woodie Club site. They also have a discussion forum like this one.<BR>Check them out and join at:<BR><A HREF="http://www.nationalwoodieclub.com" TARGET=_blank>National Woodie Club</A>.<P>Good Luck.<p>[ 01-22-2002: Message edited by: Bill Stoneberg ]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rich,<P>Give it a shot, yourself. If you do OK, then fine. If not, what are you out? I am doing a lot of the wood on my Town Sedan. I just got into that portion of the restoration. I planed and glued up a piece last night. There are a couple of pieces I intend to purchase, but most of it I feel I can do myself. I had some oak in my shop that I am using, but will have to purchase more. Dressed oak at Home Depot is about $6.00 per board foot. I found some rough cut oak at a local lumber yard that is $4.10 per board foot. I found another lumber yard that had it for $1.30 per board foot. That threw up a red flag! After asking a few questions, I found that it was fresh cut, unseasoned, GREEN lumber. I KNEW there had to be something going on for a price like that! Talk about twisting and warping. I think I'll go for the $4.10 stuff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think I'm with you Model A Hal! Sounds like you don't mind getting your hands dirty Rstr Rich. The way I figured it, I'll try most things once to see how I do. Since the wood was hidden (and I could take out what I attempeted and let someone else take over)I thought I would give it a try. Your experience may prove different than mine, but with no more experience that H.S. shop class I was able to pull the project off. The extra $$$'s for kiln dryed wood would be my reccommendation. Pretty tough stuff, but it proved to be more stable to work with. Getting a usable pattern also helps. I was able to piece together enough wood from the pass. side of the car and reversed it for a pattern for the other side. Also keep in mind dimensional changes in the old wood that may have take place over the years.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Roadster -<BR>If you already have the shop tools, you should try to reproduce structural wood parts. That way you can do the trial and error fitting yourself.<P>Regarding Mickey and Minnie. They are originally from Burbank, CA where Disney Studios is located: <A HREF="http://disney.go.com/StudioOperations/" TARGET=_blank>http://disney.go.com/StudioOperations/</A> <BR>The theme parks came much later when these mice and their friends were adults - so to speak. tongue.gif" border="0

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the continuing saga of my 1930 Chrysler 77?<P>Since Treehouse Woods is about 30 minutes from me I decided to give them a call yesterday (Wednesday 23 January 2002). I really didn?t know what I was going to ask or what to expect. I spoke with Erik Johnson, who was super nice on the phone. As luck would have it, turns out he was going to be nearby and offered to stop in and have a look at the car. I quickly cleaned up my work space so I only looked ½ the slob I am.<P>Erik arrived and looked over the car. Overall he felt the car was in very good condition, which of course was nice to hear. Looks like virtually all the wood in the rear end is going to have to go, what doesn?t have insect damage (what turns out to be beetle damage not termite damage) has water damage. And of course there is the matter of the completely missing floorboards and seats. He noticed a few things I had missed, but on the positive side some of the wood towards the front I thought would have to be replaced he felt was in good shape. The down side is, he confirmed that the body will in fact need to be removed for the needed repairs.<P>He suggested I come up to the shop and see some of their works in progress. He has a ?slot? free now, should I decide I want to use their services. There was absolutely no pressure as to whether I use them or not. All in all it was a very pleasant and very informative discussion. I certainly feel better about my investment in the car thus far, even with the looming expense of the woodwork. He indicated they could do much more than just the woodwork. Including stripping/painting the frame, body, etc, as well as minor bodywork (and all the car needs is minor). Also they could replicate something close to the original seats, and provide upholstery services. Should I want the services he seemed to think the whole lot would take 2 to 3 months.<P>Well now comes the dilemma. I really want to work on the car myself, but being that I have no one helping me out with the physical labor, I?m concerned about being able to pull the body, etc. Not to mention my own lack of expertise. Okay I guess the reality is I am overwhelmed by the task at the moment. Working on engines is one thing, but bodywork is definitely something I have no clue on. I don?t mind learning new things; I just have some serious fears of damaging or destroying something out of ignorance. Of course there also is the dollar issue. Should I have them do all of the things he said they could do, the tag would break the 5-digit figure mark (note: a little clarification; that is break as in low 5 Digits, not as in going to 6 digits!). I am perplexed as to how to even begin assessing what to do next. I really would like to do as much as I can on the car myself, then again what are my limits? Also there are time factors, sure would be nice to be driving around in the car by years end, if not late summer. But am I restoring the car if I have them do all that work? Will I be disappointed that I did not do it myself at a later date? If I do it, will I find myself the fool for not having had it done?<P>I know I am likely over thinking all of this; do most folks go through some similar concerns and over thinking with their first restoration?<P>I don?t want to loose out on the sense of accomplishment from completing the task. I also do not want to never complete the task because I take on more than I am capable of either doing, or managing by myself.<P>Thanks all for letting me ramble, as always, comments, suggestions, even criticism?s are welcome?<P>Rich<p>[ 01-24-2002: Message edited by: Roadster Rich ]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rich,<P>Not knowing any more than I do about your situation, it's hard to answer your question. If you have the money, and want it in a hurry, pay the man. If you are like me, neither rich nor retired, but want an antique car, do it yourself as you have the time and money.<P>I am doing practically every aspect of my restoration myself. It has taken two years so far and probably at least one more to go. I did not and still do not posses all of the skills necessary to do this job, but I am learning. Think of it as several small projects rather than one large one. I find that I can spend some money, buy some parts/materials, and then I have enough stuff to keep me busy for a while. By the time I have completed that project, I have saved enough money to buy the stuff for the next one, and have learned a lot in the proccess. It all comes out in the wash. <P>When I get done, will it be a professional restoration? Of course not! But it will be good enough for me, better than some I've seen, and a heck of a lot better than it was when I started.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think Model A Hal & I are pursueing our project cars in the same way. Neither one of us are rich or retired so we do all we can on our own. shocked.gif" border="0 <P>My '37 Chrysler was complete but, due to sitting for several years, corrosion in the brake and fuel systems had taken over. I have almost gotten it to the point where I can drive it this spring in spite of separated window glass and a left running board that flops in the breeze. Oh yeah, the chrome, paint and interior all need attention. frown.gif" border="0 <P>My plan is to get it to the point where I can drive safely down the road without worrying about parts falling off. When I get to that point, I will start looking at the appearance items! grin.gif" border="0

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wish you the best in doing the coachwork, Years ago my dad and myself took on doing a 28 Auburn Boattail, working on it at night and the weekends it only took 3 months to make everything new from the firewall to the back bumper. We later found out this car was #7 of the frist 25 boattails made, after you have all the parts fitted in is also a good idea to put a wood preserver on it to prevent any rotting later or fungus. Other thing if you can find a sawmill that has kiln dired rough milled lumber it will reduce the cost quite a bit..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rich,<BR>Now for an opposing point of view....<BR>I am not rich or retired either but I do know when something is out of my ballpark to do. I have tried both bodywork and woodwork and have found out I can do neither well. Give me mechanicals and I am fine. Other jobs, if I want it done right, I pay.<P>Now, it depends on what kind of job you want. I didn't want to be disappointed later on or look back and say I should have done it this way or that way.<P>So I gave the car to someone who will do a good job and who is as pickey as I am. He understands that I am building a 400 point show car and is working towards that.<P>So decide what you want and decide if you can do the job. I will say to check references before leaving any car with a person who you are going to spend major money with.<P>Go look at his shop, see what kind of work he does, get references. It cant hurt.<p>[ 01-24-2002: Message edited by: Bill Stoneberg ]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the input guys. I'm not rich, and given my obsessive nature with things, I imagine I will be poor before the car is done whether I do everything myself or someone else does the work for me. I bought the car for several reasons, perhaps the most important was something for my father and I to talk about, and to the extent that he is able work on together. Due to health issues he really is more technical advisor, moral support and go-fer. I have in the past tried my hand at body work, this is something I am not particularly good at, even though I had some fantastic teachers. It must be related to my inability to be artistic, I can see things in my mind, my hands just can't seem to do them. Woodwork I am not particularly elegant at, but I can (sometimes with a second or third try mind you) make some decent functional pieces.<P>My concerns on my abilities with the car have a great deal to do with things like how the wood is attached to the steel skins, etc. And my ability, or lack thereof to do the body work justice. The car had been leaded before the 'attack' of the beetles, therefore it looks really nice, save a poor peeling paint job. The car had not been really reassembled since it was leaded and subsequently (not sure of the time differential) painted. Many of the trim piece holes have not been repunched through the leading. There is virtually no rust on the car, and the only serious signs of rust repair are in the rear end around the rumble seat area and rear wheel wells, which I am told are the common areas for these cars to rust.<P>I should point out my original intention was not at this juncture in life to create a show stopper car, I was hoping for something I could do some reliable touring in (maybe not transcontinental, maybe even only intrastate). Perhaps one day I'll want that perfect show car, but for now, I'd rather have something I can tool around in with my father, take to the local and semi local shows, and just be social and have a good time.<P>I guess in some odd sense I am restoring the car in an effort to restore something I lost sometime ago, a closeness with my father, and a chance to spend more or our remaining time together.<P>Well again I am rambling, I do appreciate all the input. I have no clue where I am heading at this juncture. I have no doubt I could eventually do the woodwork and body work, I just have doubts about what the car might look like when I am done wink.gif" border="0 I'm really not looking for the FrankenChrysler look, and I don't want good ole Walter P. visiting me at night from the grave about it either cool.gif" border="0 <P>Rich

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rich<BR>I restore cars professionally so I thought I would give you another perspective. I always encourage my customers to get involved in the restoration of their cars to the extent that they feel comfortable. This varies from sending checks to actually looking for parts. I can't remember how many cars I have done that were started by the owner and never finished. The biggest problem with any restoration is frustation. If you can not work for DAYS on end seeing little or no progress without becoming frustrated then my advice would be pay someone to do it for you. In selecting a shop- remember to check references, and meet with the owner. You will be dealing with this person on a frequent basis so you need to find someone that you can get along with. There is not much worse than dealing with someone you don't like about something as emotional as a car. It can make you have a "bad taste" in your mouth for the car as long as you own it. Lastly, look at their work for yourself. Good references do not always a good shop make. Some people are very easy to please/fool.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can totally relate to what you are going through. The Wood on my 1912 E-M-F Demi tonneau was inthe same (or probably worse) shape. I knew that when I bought it. <P>I Would agree with the others who suggested doing the work yourself. When I started my project, someone on this forum suggested I get Don Marsh's notes on wood body restoration, which I did, and I am glad I did. Here is a link to where you can find aout about the notes and even buy them I think<BR><A HREF="http://www.antiqueautoarchive.com/" TARGET=_blank>Tips on Auto Body Wood Work by Don Marsh</A><P>With the tools you have, and time, you can do the work. <P>I know it seems like a big job. When I removed what was left of the body of my E-M-F, it was impassible to get it off without damaging it. You can read about my trials in this restoration (stil underway) on the E-M-F Homepage. Here is a URL:<BR><A HREF="http://1freespace.com/auto/jmd1" TARGET=_blank>E-M-F Homepage</A><P>If you have any questions, I wouldbe happy to help if I can.<P>I, like may other here, am an unretired, poor worker and I have three small children to raise at the same time. Not a lot of extra money for my hobbie.<P>Good luck

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rich, you are getting some extremely good responses on this thread and I think a lot of us are learning. I have gone both ways. My wife's '27 Marmon needed total restoration and we wanted it to be a top quality (400 point) car. We figured that as slow as I work and with the other priorities that we would be 80 before it was finished. It will soon be completed by a pro.<P>I have done a few motorcycles and powered bikes successfully by myself and have done most of the restoration work on our drivers - we call them drivers because that is exactly what they are - we use them on the various types of tours that AACA and some of the other clubs offer. <P>It was not until your last input that you really defined your goal and that is the very first thing you must do!! <P>If your goal is a Grand National level competitor, it is going to take a long time and money. It takes a lot less time and money if the objective is to have a driver and won't be embarrassed by being seen in public. <P>I totally agree with your sentiment about doing the work yourself. That's why I picked this hobby. I've learned an awful lot of skills that I never possessed before bending tin. A lot of cars are acquired by hobbiests that had been worked on so long that the owner finally lost interest and gave up. Try not to get into that category.<P>Now I would like to address another statement you made. You are right about the lonely feeling of working by yourself, even if your father does help some. Have you tried to contact your local AACA region? You'd be amazed at how easy it is to get a few to help. One of the funnest things is taking the body off the frame. A few six packs of cold drinks and some cold cuts, and an invitation to a "take the body off the frame" party will attract hobbiests like flies. As you get to meet the members you will also find those who have skills and experience in certain areas and will be glad to help you learn. Joining my region was one of the very best moves I made many years ago.<P>Finally one point made previously is so important that it needs repeating. After establishing your objective address each job in small chunks. I mounted an old bulb horn on the wall of my shop. Every time I finish a small chunk, I blow the horn. Sally knows I'm a happy man when I come in the house and she has heard the horn blow a couple of times.<P>Whichever approach you take, just remember that we are here and will support when we can. Best wishes. wink.gif" border="0

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I often post questions here even when I think I know the answer. I find the diversity of knowledge and perspectives to be most educational and very beneficial. I plan on visiting the local region (Cape Canaveral) next month, within an hour and a half of me there are also Indian River, Space Coast and Florida Regions. Indian River is about the same distance from me meeting wise as the Cape Canaveral except to the south. I expect that it is more likely people local to me will attend the Cape Canaveral region meeting.<P>I attended a local swap meet today and spoke with a couple of people who have done early 30's Chrysler product restorations. At the moment I am back leaning towards attempting the work myself, assuming I can follow Ron's advice and locate some brains and braun for the job. I have been told that with my car the body is not tacked directly to the wood, rather it sits on the wood and then there are straps from the body that are attached to the wood. I found a few of the straps in my car on cursory look today. Perhaps this is accurate, one of my big concerns is the typically poor quality of body work I do. I had several interesting suggestions on the choice of wood to use ranging from the original Ash to Oak to kiln dried Pressure Treated lumber. Perhaps the best suggestion was to purchase the absolute cheapest kiln dried pine I can get and practice making a few of the tougher pieces out of it. Once I have perfected my techniques, then move on to the 'good' stuff.<P>I have looked the body over fairly closely, and have a general idea of how it is attached at this point. In so doing I discovered yet a few more 'interesting' repairs that were made in the past. Apparently the door posts had gone a bit soft, rather than replacing them someone welded a few pieces of metal straps between the steel posts in the car and the (excuse my lack of proper terms here) face plate that runs up the inside of the post where the door latch, striker, etc are. Looks like I'll have to do a little cutting just to get the body off. <P>I was also told that while the wood hardners and preservatives may be too late for my wood, that they may well give it the strength it needs to hold together until I can use the wood for templates. Sounds logical, though I don't know if it is accurate or not.<P>As to objectives, for now I would like to complete the project in a relatively short period of time (maybe a year?) to the point the car is driveable. In so doing I do not want to damage or do work which will prevent or make excessively expensive the task of re-restoring the car at a future date for show purposes.<P>With the help of many AACA members, WPCC members, and contacts I have made through them, I have or have located the majority of the critical parts I need. (Though if you are reading this and know where I can get seats and running boards for a 1930 Chrysler 77 Rumble Seat Roadster please contact me!) I still have a long parts list, but I am learning the 'make do' mantra.<P>As always I have digressed from the topic at hand. Suffice it to say at the moment I am leaning towards doing as much of the work as I can myself. The encouragement, and stories (both good and horror) of those here have helped tremendously.<P>Rich

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rich, <BR>It seems you have the tools to do the job. I agree with your leaning to try the woodwork yourself. I did this on a 1916 Overland 7 pass touring which was in a chicken yord when I bought it. I lived in Az at the time so brought the car from Iowa to Az. It sat there in the arid desert air for severasl months before I could start on the restoration. I found that all the wood from the seat level down was full of dry rot to the point it was possible to press an 8d finish nail completly into the wood by fingers only. The restoration went much more smoothly than I expected. You need to start at the bottom where the body frame meets the chassis frame. Before taking anything apart be sure to get good detailed photos . Take notes with dimensions before disassembly. I found that in areas where body wood supported the sheetmetal that leaving those parts a little large left room for final metal fitting. Oak or ash are the only woods I would consider. Your local hardwood suplier can supply you with seasoned s2s( surfaced 2 sides) material. You can usually sort thru the pile to select what you want.<BR>I suggest that you give it a try because of the self satisfaction of a job well done as well as the cost saving.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey Rich,<BR>I can only encourage you to attempt the woodwork yourself. You've stated that you are a bit of a perfectionist when it comes to woodworking and it sounds like you have the tools. That combination with your idea of starting with inexpensive pine before butchering expensive hardwoods sounds like a winning idea.<P>It has been mentioned to take a lot of detailed photos before you begin but let me pass on a suggestion made to me recently. If you, a relative or friend has a video camera, use it instead of still pictures. While you're shooting the video you can add audio notes that you could miss in still photos. Remember that reassembly will be several months down the road and even the best memories can fail. A simple comment like "In the lower left corner was a screw that I didn't know was there" can jog your memory. Or how about this one; "The screws and hardware were put in a Maxwell House coffee can and placed on the second shelf from the top over the workbench".<P>The other advantage to this method is you can pop the tape into the VCR right after you record it and see how it turns out. If you need more light or clearer audio notes, you can do so without delay before you rip things apart.<P>I don't know why I didn't think of this myself, but it makes good sense and I plan on using from now on.<P>Good luck....<BR> Ron

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the ever continuing saga of my car and the wood I have posted a number of pictures depicting some of the damage. I am slowly adding descriptive text to the pictures to describe what is being seen. I have no floor board, and several of the boards on the left (drivers) side of the car are missing. The missing boards can be replicated from the matching boards on the right (passenger) side of the car I believe. The single biggest issue is the board (beam?) that runs across from left to right directly in front of the Rumble Seat opening. The wood is completely gone there. Also the door posts appear a bit soft, with two (right rear post, left front post) showing signs of beetle damage. Several of the cosmetic pieces of wood for attaching the interior trim to appear to look good in the pictures but in actuality are also paper thin. The board that runs the width of the car directly behind the rumble seat, between just over the gas tank at the very back of the car is also totally rotten though it appears to be from water damage rather than from beetles. I will keep adding to the descriptions on the images so if anyone is interested do check in from time to time to see what has been updated. The url is:<P><A HREF="http://www.1930chrysler77.com/SD.ASP?D=Wood" TARGET=_blank>http://www.1930chrysler77.com/SD.ASP?D=Wood</A><P>Thanks for everyone input, I'm still soliciting opinions. Hopefully the pictures with descriptions will help.<P>Rich

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The saga continues. Best friends brother is Master cabinet maker as it turns out. He has the tools and knowledge to do the work it seems, and has the interest. He is going to come down and check out the car and let me know what his opinion is, but it looks promising. While I wouldn't be doing the bulk of the cutting and shaping I would still be helping out with the disassembly, reassembly and final shaping. This may well be a good comprimise... still open for opinions though... that and seats for my car!<P>Rich

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rich:<BR>Some years ago I began work on a 1925 Studebaker that had very poor wood body framing and sill plates. I measured up the frame and did a little drafting work to get an outline of what I would need. Found a area handicrafter exotic wood supplier that had 10 quarter Ash stock I could afford and then the problem I didn't expect was local wood shops that still had planers did not want to run stock harder than Pine! The Ash and Oak woods were "Too hard on the bearings in their old machines". Since it was not cosmetic and only structural, I table saw ripped it close to dimension and sanded it smooth enough with a hand held belt machine. Just line up your shops before you invest in material.<BR>Stude8

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

Well the wood saga continues...

After many false starts... and lots of not so good luck... looks like its time I do the woodwork myself.

I got an estimate from two places that do the work professionally, simply out I cannot afford them.

The master cabinet maker who was going to help took ill and was improving, so that looked promising. Unfortunately he had a heart attack recently and passed on.

This puts me back to doing the work myself. I've picked up a few more tools for the shop, and tried my hand at some pine work. So far so good. I've called the local hard wood supplier and hope to hear back on the availability of the wood I need early next week. I'm searching for ash as my first choice, we'll see what he can turn up and how much it will dent the wallet.

The pieces I made out of pine are tolerable, fortunately most of the wood work is rather basic and somewhat crude in construction. Lots of curves to cut though, guess I'd better brush up on cutting them. Bought a new band-saw, need to get it out of the crate and assembled.

Almost 2 years later and I'm finally actually starting the wood work... so back to looking for suggestions in case anyone missed the thread the first time...

Rich

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rich,

Just to give you an idea on woodwork. We had estimates ranging from $8,000 to $15,000 to hire someone to do the wood body on our woodie wagon. We bought the stuff (wood from a lumberyard and NOT a kit) ourselves and did everything for $800. Our car took a Senior at Hershey last month, and we've had many offers from people to do woodwork on their cars, so I'd say that we did okay on it.

If you don't have the equipment or the confidence and can stand to wait, is there a trade or technical school in your area? A lot of times these trade schools will take on projects like that to give the students experience in doing stuff, and the cost is very minimal in comparison. Of course if you plan on showing the car and going for the big awards, the job that they do may not be good enough, but on the other hand, you can pay someone a bundle of money and might not get any better work either.

At this point it will depend on your resources, confidence and abilities. As I've said before, we had a price of $15,000 to hire the wood body, and my father and I did a complete frame up restoration for $19,000 to include the wood (which the wood was $800). For the prices of hiring your wood done, you can throw a lot of boards out and still be way ahead, have the satisfaction of doing it yourself, and you may be able to do just as good yourself.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rich, dont know what kind of deal you get on wood but the bit of wood working that I do I buy from a local hardwood dealer. Pisgah Hardwoods, 740-758-5372. They used to have a web page may still be out there. I know they ship everywhere and compared to what Home Depot wants is about 2/3 less.

Lots of timber in this part of Ohio. They cut and dry their own wood and if you need custom thickness, size etc, they can accommodate. They have quite a variety on hand.

greg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What you will find doing wook working for the old cars, it best to find a saw mill to supply you the rough cut lumber as to apposed to dress lumber as you will be using hardly any of the finished surfaces that would be on a home depot type piece. We did a 28 Auburn for another guy years ago, in 3 mos. working on it at night and weekends coping every part, using mainly the band saw and and electric hand plane, as well as rotery rasp's for the shaping.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...