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Lets see if there is someone to ID this car


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Hello to all. I'm new to this site and was hoping that someone might be able to help ID this car in an old family photo. A few of my relatives, ancestors, are in the photo. I thought the photo was very neat but the car brand eludes me. There is a name in the top of the radiator shell but I cant get a good idea of what it might say. The photo was taken on the old family farm in NE Iowa back in the mid Teens I think. Thanks for the help identifying this car. One thought was a 1911 Overland, but the Overlands I have seen pictures of used a name badge on the radiator shell not a script stamping for a name. Is my thinking correct?

post-67584-143138210531_thumb.jpg

post-67584-143138210535_thumb.jpg

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Can you read the name on the hub cap with a magnifying glass? If you can that will give you the make. Google the make and the year you think the car it is, if the car shown on Google does not look the same use a different year until you find a car the matches your photo.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I really appreciate the replys so far in regard the pictures. The pics are large in physical size but even a magnifying glass doesn't help in making a true ID possible. Why is it that all of the Overland pics I see have a radiator badge on the shell and not the script lettering? What was the survival rate of these? Decent? What were the running speeds? Would it travel at a decent rate down the road? It looks like it would ride very smoothly.

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  • 5 months later...

The car pictured is not an Overland.

1912 was the first year Overland used the oval cloisonne radiator emblem.

In 1913, the red and blue colors were reversed to the familiar arrangement that continued into the 1920's.

Prior to then, the word "Overland" did not appear on the (brass) radiator shells, but it was usually painted on each side of the hood - diagonally in the lower, front corners of the top panels.

Sheet and cast brass "Overland" radiator scripts were commonly used and may have been factory equipment. One is shown in the 1910 sales catalog.

Bill

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  • 2 weeks later...

Perry, I would have to say that the high wheeler in the corn crib in the background would have been a horse buggy.

I'm just shooting this out for an idea. Might this car have been a Mitchell? I saw an photo of a 1911 on the horseless carriage classifieds ads and the majority of the features look like they match. What are your thoughts? Did Mitchell have a script name on the radiator shell? I'm still at a loss here.

Kelly

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  • 9 years later...

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