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Here's a question...

 

Did all Stude Dictators have a heat push/pull knob? the one in the museum has one.

 

Where it is on mine is a fuel pump switch. There is a slider switch below the dash that I haven't figured out yet. I think it was a replacement as it is a plastic slider switch.

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The slider switch under my fast on. 38 State Commander is for the dash lights one way and a courtesy light the other way 

my heater fan is a turn knob on the bottom side of the dash. 

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I have a slider under the dash that controls the map / courtesy light and gauge lights, center is off. My choke is to the right of the gauges while yours appears to be to the left of the steering. I also have a "The Dictator" badge directly above my gauges. I can't see that there is any badge in the pic of your dash. I am wondering if Studebaker didn't provide the coach company with a chassis complete with engine, transmission, front end and such and then it was customized into a hearse like more modern ones. 

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7 hours ago, kclark said:

Here's a question...

 

Did all Stude Dictators have a heat push/pull knob? the one in the mustalled.  Alsonum has one.

 

Where it is on mine is a fuel pump switch. There is a slider switch below the dash that I haven't figured out yet. I think it was a replacement as it is a plastic slider switch.

Heaters were an optional extra and not all cars would have had one.  Studebaker did supply them, but they were dealer Installed.  There were aftermarket ones as well.

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7 hours ago, keninman said:

I am wondering if Studebaker didis reaonable to say that Studebakert't prbased on  isvide the coach company with1927na chassis complete wchnth engine, transmission, front end and such and then it was customized into a hearse like more modern ones. 

OK, now we are going In the right direction.  Studebaker provided commercial chassis based on the Dictator, Commander and President to outside suppliers beginning In 1927.  (For Interests sake, look up "1929 Studebaker house car "on Youtube.  It Is based on a Studebaker truck chassis with a President engine)

 

The commercial chassis came with sedan bodywork back to the cowl, beefed up frame and suspension and possibly al longer wheelbase.  Unless my old eyes are deceiving me, this vehicles has a longer wheelbase than a standard Dictator sedan (112 Inches).  It also appears to have larger tires and heavier wheels.  I have seen other hearses that look like this, so I think I can say that Studebaker contracted an outside body builder to supply standard hearse bodies on all commercial chassis which were then sold through Studebaker dealers.  

 

Terry

 

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If it were my car (and I wish it was), I would:

Be very careful power washing as you are forcing water into every crack and crevice at 3000 psi. So stay away from your starter, generator, fuel pump, steering gear box, horn, etc. Otherwise you need to get the water out of each of these parts (i.e. - disassemble). Instead, I would soak with degreaser and use a hose with a small brush and you can direct water appropriately. It is slower but safer.

 

Next I would drop the oil pan and clean it out. It's a pain but you won't have to worry about all the nasty sludge that may be there. I would use any good motor oil. I like straight weight oils like SAE 30 but the multi viscosity mentioned earlier would be fine.

 

Next, I would drain the gas tank, fuel pump and carb (they should all have drain plugs - be careful, especially with carb, if they are stuck then leave them). Just use the lowest octane fuel available (87). Less ethanol is better to prevent rust in tank over time.

 

Of course check the tires, trans oil level, axle oil level, coolant, etc.

 

Then have a great time driving it.

Scott

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1 hour ago, dictator27 said:

OK, now we are going In the right direction.  Studebaker provided commercial chassis based on the Dictator, Commander and President to outside suppliers beginning In 1927.  (For Interests sake, look up "1929 Studebaker house car "on Youtube.  It Is based on a Studebaker truck chassis with a President engine)

 

The commercial chassis came with sedan bodywork back to the cowl, beefed up frame and suspension and possibly al longer wheelbase.  Unless my old eyes are deceiving me, this vehicles has a longer wheelbase than a standard Dictator sedan (112 Inches).  It also appears to have larger tires and heavier wheels.  I have seen other hearses that look like this, so I think I can say that Studebaker contracted an outside body builder to supply standard hearse bodies on all commercial chassis which were then sold through Studebaker dealers.  

 

Terry

 

 

Studebaker did provide chassies for Coachbuilders for Ambulances and Hearses. The Superior Coach Builders did the coach work. They later provided them to Buick, Ford and Lastly in 1939 to Cadillac.

 

Brief history is here.

 

That said, mine is slightly longer as they made 2 longer chassies. mine is 146" and the other I believe is 158". This length varies slightly from year to year.

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Oh, and don't worry about lead additives in the fuel, your car doesn't have the high compression nor high valve pressures that required the lead content, which really came later in the development of higher horsepower engines.

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4 minutes ago, Stude Light said:

If it were my car (and I wish it was), I would:

Be very careful power washing as you are forcing water into every crack and crevice at 3000 psi. So stay away from your starter, generator, fuel pump, steering gear box, horn, etc. Otherwise you need to get the water out of each of these parts (i.e. - disassemble). Instead, I would soak with degreaser and use a hose with a small brush and you can direct water appropriately. It is slower but safer.

 

Next I would drop the oil pan and clean it out. It's a pain but you won't have to worry about all the nasty sludge that may be there. I would use any good motor oil. I like straight weight oils like SAE 30 but the multi viscosity mentioned earlier would be fine.

 

Next, I would drain the gas tank, fuel pump and carb (they should all have drain plugs - be careful, especially with carb, if they are stuck then leave them). Just use the lowest octane fuel available (87). Less ethanol is better to prevent rust in tank over time.

 

Of course check the tires, trans oil level, axle oil level, coolant, etc.

 

Then have a great time driving it.

Scott

 

Some have stated in some threads that they lined their gas tank. How is this done?

 

And I'm definitely going to degrease and no pressure washing.

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To have the tank "lined". Drain the tank, remove it, take it to Gas Tank Renu (I'm pretty sure they have a national chain). They will sand blast the exterior, drill 6 one inch holes in it, sandblast the inside, put patches on the inside and solder them on from the outside releveling the holes with solder. Tell them not to repaint it. That will cost about $350. Now go find a reputable body/paint shop and have a little filler work done to level out the Renu work and have it repainted black. That's probably $500+. Reinstall.

 

This results in a beautifully restored tank that has a coating impervious to gasoline and alcohol and water that should last your lifetime.

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1 hour ago, Stude Light said:

If it were my car (and I wish it was), I would:

Be very careful power washing as you are forcing water into every crack and crevice at 3000 psi. So stay away from your starter, generator, fuel pump, steering gear box, horn, etc. Otherwise you need to get the water out of each of these parts (i.e. - disassemble). Instead, I would soak with degreaser and use a hose with a small brush and you can direct water appropriately. It is slower but safer.

 

Next I would drop the oil pan and clean it out. It's a pain but you won't have to worry about all the nasty sludge that may be there. I would use any good motor oil. I like straight weight oils like SAE 30 but the multi viscosity mentioned earlier would be fine.

 

Next, I would drain the gas tank, fuel pump and carb (they should all have drain plugs - be careful, especially with carb, if they are stuck then leave them). Just use the lowest octane fuel available (87). Less ethanol is better to prevent rust in tank over time.

 

Of course check the tires, trans oil level, axle oil level, coolant, etc.

 

Then have a great time driving it.

Scott

 

1 hour ago, kclark said:

 

Some have stated in some threads that they lined their gas tank. How is this done?

I sure wouldn't do that now. It sounds and looks like it's been regularly driven with fresh fuel and, as long as there are no leaks I wouldn't do a thing to the tank.

 

 

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I cleaned the inside the best I could with water and gravel then let it dry out. Afterwards I used a product called Red-Kote to seal the inside of the tank. Remember I bought mine to cruise around in, not restore to museum quality. If you are going to show it then I would certainly paint the outside nicely but I am not sure that sandblasting the inside is warranted.  I also added an electric fuel pump but it is usually not energized. I put it in after I vapor locked a couple of times. Since then though I have started adding about a gallon of kerosene to the tank every 5 or 10 gallons of gas and so I have not needed to use the electric pump except to refill the carb after having it off. 

 

I also used Red-Kote on the inside of my carburetor's (yes I now have two) to seal them. You just have to be very careful not to seal any ports shut. Don't try to take the carburetor apart until talking to people here though or you will likely have a broken carb. 

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9 minutes ago, keninman said:

I cleaned the inside the best I could with water and gravel then let it dry out. Afterwards I used a product called Red-Kote to seal the inside of the tank. Remember I bought mine to cruise around in, not restore to museum quality. If you are going to show it then I would certainly paint the outside nicely but I am not sure that sandblasting the inside is warranted. 

Let me clarify. I'm not going to do shows. I will be taking it to some of our local cruise ins. It will be put into service for my funeral home and "shown" at the cruise ins. 

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I didn't give my opinion on the tank liner. I'm with Starlightcoupe, if it's working fine and not leaking, I would leave it as is. I figured the process and cost would steer you that way based on what a nice car it is already.

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The car has yet to arrive, but I've learned more information since I bought it on Monday. I learned from another forum who restored it last and that it was done in the 70's. I have very little doubt that the car is in good shape and I doubt needs anything major in the near future. We may look at a new paint job and definitely new tires. 

Edited by kclark (see edit history)

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1 hour ago, kclark said:

The car has yet to arrive, but I've learned more information since I bought it on Monday. I learned from another forum who restored it last and that it was done in the 70's. I have very little doubt that the car is not in good shape and I doubt needs anything major in the near future. We may look at a new paint job and definitely new tires. 

I bought the new tires, tubes and flaps after I ran a stick through one. That was about $570 and another $45 for a Hercules Rim tool (a must have) but at least I have good tires. I used 2 quarts of Flex Seal to stop the top from leaking like a sieve.

 

I believe my GL was repainted in the 80s and it is in dire need of a repaint. Fortunately that is what my neighbor does for a living. I plan to replace the top at the same time. I started on the undercarriage to mitigate rust and damage to the wood floor. I have the front pretty solid but I still need to address amidships and the rear. 

 

The car you have is fantastic. I wish I could afford something like it. 

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A lot of people have told me it is a great car in great condition. I believe the previous owner took good care of it and has been garage kept as it will be when I receive it. I have spent the passed couple of days making room for it in the garage.

Edited by kclark (see edit history)
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Only if my funeral home is doing the services. At least that is what I'm thinking at this point. If there is enough interest I might reconsider but there would definitely be some expense going here there and yonder.

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Can someone provide me a picture of what the serial number on a 1929 Studebaker should look like. I certainly do not see one on mine. I'm trying to get it ready to be titled.

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There are two from what I gather. One on the frame just behind the drivers side front wheel the other on the firewall. My car was titled with the one on the firewall just above the steering column though I have been told that the one on the frame is the one that was supposed to be used. 

serial number plate.jpg

20170605_230252.jpg

20170605_230259.jpg

Edited by keninman (see edit history)

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On ‎8‎/‎09‎/‎2017 at 1:03 PM, keninman said:

I don't know, I have not tried. I did buy the special wrench to unscrew them but have not tried yet. I have two missing door handles. I am using vice grips for one. Another is broken off but still works and one that is intact and works. They seem to be made out of the same die cast as the carburetor. 

 

Could it be a modified Commander GJ Six? What gets me is the tie bar with the "6" in it. Like the GL Dictator it came in both the 6 and 8 cylinder versions. 

Image result for 1929 studebaker commander six

That was my thought having read this post for the first time. Clues - the Engine number would start with GJ.... The GJ engine, which was a one year only model is just a GE with 1/8" extra stroke as far as I can see. Another clue is that it is on 19" wheels. All of the GEs were on 20s.

Edited by nzcarnerd (see edit history)

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I was wondering the same thing. The GE has the spark plugs evenly spaced in the head. The engine pictured has them unevenly spaced as in pairs?

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