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engine, manifolds prep for paint


WillBilly53
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what's the best way to prepare an engine and manifolds to be painting. i've got the high temp stuff from POR 15. i think i'm alright with the manifolds, i read the long post on here about the manifolds (heating them up and such) but my main concern was the grease and surface rust.<BR>is there a solution to use like laquer thinner to clean greasey parts with?<P>also, i CANNOT get the manifolds off. the bolts are very heavily rusted. any suggestions? i've got a propane heater but it doesn't seem to be working, and i've got PB Blaster but no dice, either.<P>HELP!<P>thanks,<BR>-will e.

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I have good results by steam cleaning and then sand blast, but you gots ta seal up all the holes with duct tape.<BR> Bolts.. can you start and warm up the engine? some times that helps,also sharp rap SQUARELY on the bolt head by a hammer some times,finally to get the heat try acetlyne torch, let the rust stuff soak a week & dowse every day try Kroil.

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Guest Skyking

Will, when I clean my engines for detailing I use K-1 (kerosene). After everything is washed & dried, I go over the engine with lacquer thinner on a rag before painting. I never had any problems doing it that way...

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Guest scott mich bca # 6619

Laquer thinner or gasoline first.<P>Make sure in a well vented area. <P>Sandblasting is the best way to insure that all the paint, grease. oil and other contaminates are removed.<P>After sandblasting, the wire wheel brush, either in a floor grinder or drill smoothes out the sandblasting. Steel wool, in a few different grades next.<P>Blow dry the manifolds with compresser air.<P>Then just before you paint then, wash then with laquer thinner, allow to air dry and then blow dry again.<P>Make sure you were latex gloves when you clean them with the thinner, as you do not want the grease or oil from your fingers to ruin the cleanleness of the newly cleaned manifolds.<P>Remember a few light coats of paint are better than heavy ones. With the POR only one coat, brushed in one direction.<P>As far as removing them, I would try a torch, (carefuly), and then maybe a socket with a breaker bar.<P>Take it to a shop if you can't remove them yourself. They can start the bolts, and you can still drive home.<P>Scott Mich<BR>Assistant Director<BR>Chicagoland Chapter

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Oh, one more thing. Make sure that the epoxy primer that you will be using is compatible with the paint and clear coat (if you clear it). In some cases one type of paint will react negatively with a different type and will actually peel it up. Any body supply shop will be able to tell you about paint/primer compatibility.

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clear on engine paint?????<P>I'm sure no OEM even considered it. Hirsch enamel is at least as "fancy" as any original engine I ever saw.

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okay...<BR> a couple of things,<BR>i have no sandblaster, is por 15's metal ready okay to use? i don't really like the thought of "covering up" rust. cause in my mind it will still be there and that bugs me. does it dissolve rust or cover it up? i have a bunch of wire wheels/power drill, sander, and a dremel tool for tight spots also. i don't mind a lot of elbow grease cause i really don't have money or access to a sandblaster. but please tell me if i'm just crazy for doing this without a sandblaster.<BR>the paint i'm using is buick green from por-15. should i use the regular por 15 as a primer? and what's this clear coat?<P>and what about the engine painting kit from por 15? anybody had experience with it or heard any pros/cons?<P>thanks again,<P>will e.

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Guest Skyking

One thing I wouldn't do is sandblast an engine. That sand is very, very fine....You don't know how much is going to go inside. I wouldn't chance it.....remove any rust with a wire wheel, to me it is much safer!

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Paint it purple pearl with a clear coat if that's what you like. But from a restoration standpoint, engines were not painted that way.<P>I agree with caution about sandblasting. Get loose grunge and rust off, degrease well, and paint. Many engine paints are made to be applied directly to metal - never use an ordinary primer with engine paint, obviously, since the primer will be less durable than the color coat.

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Guest scott mich bca # 6619

When I refered to sandblasting, I was only refering to the intake and exhaust manifold.<P>Do not sandblast the block.<P>If you are rebuilding the engine, have the machine shop hot tank the block.<P>Otherwise again the wire wheel is the next best way.<P>If you can't sandblast, then the wire wheel on the drill is the next best thing.<P>90% of painting is the preparation. Yes you have to use the right paint, and put it on properly, but if you don't prepair it properly, it all is wasted.<P>I did my entire engine and manifolds, without any primer two years ago and they still look great.<P>Scott Mich

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I think your steps are correct. The epoxy primer is only a suggestion. It will help the paint stick to the block better but it's not a necessity. It will look just as good without it as Scott said. I didn't use the epoxy primer either but it's like a little insurance policy. Your steps are correct as far as I can tell. The clear coat I mentioned would add some luster/shine to the finish but then again you don't need it.<BR>Good luck!

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