Jump to content

48 V12 Lincoln starting problem


Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

I inherited my fathers 48 Lincoln coupe with V12 and I am having troubles with getting it to start.  I remember him saying something about the fuel pump not working right.  He had changed the fuel pump and it is still doing the same thing.  I got it to start to move it to my place by taking the line off at the carb and blowing back and forth, thinking one of the check valves were stuck in the pump.  It started pumping fuel right after this.  I was thinking that the valves in the pump may have been stuck because it sat all winter and that would be the end of the problem till next year, not!  I went out the other day to start it and same problem, dump fuel in carb, runs for a few second and then dies.  I blew air through the pump from the tank side line and still no start. 

What could be going on here?   It could be dirt in the valves in the pump, but there is a inline filter just before the pump.  Thanks for your help.  

PXL_20220423_175125715.jpg

Edited by dalef62 (see edit history)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had this issue with my Lincoln and wrongly assumed that it was vapor lock. It was trash in the gas tank. It would run fine for a variable amount of time, but eventually it would die by the side of the road. I rebuilt the entire fuel system, new electric and mechanical fuel pumps, added a filter, and it still happened (hence my belief that it was heat-related). It turned out to be trash in the gas tank settling over the pickup and starving the engine for fuel. It wasn't getting to the filter because the flakes were too large--they just plugged the pick-up. Blowing back through the fuel lines would unclog it for an unknowable amount of time, but it would inevitably get plugged again.

 

If the car has been in storage for a long time, I can guarantee that the gas tank is going to need to be cleaned and sealed. Hopefully that's the problem, but any diagnostics will be difficult without a clean tank. I'd recommend starting there.

 

Hope this helps!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

I agree with Matt, you probably have debris in the tank. Try removing the copper coated steel line from the flex line and blowing towards the tank. If the pump starts delivering fuel, the problem is in the tank or the line from the tank. The inline filter could also be a part of the problem. Most of them tend to leak vacuum and the fuel pump needs to develop at least 12 inches of vacuum in order to get fuel from the tank.

 

You have a very nice Continental and if it was my car I would drop the tank and have it cleaned at a radiator shop and sealed to prevent rust. Then you can throw away your inline filter. I would also replace the steel line from the tank to the firewall as they tend to rust internally and the flex line from the steel line to the fuel pump as they deteriorate internally. If the coils have not been rebuilt by Skip Haney in Florida, I would sent them to him to be rebuilt. Then I would test drive the car to make sure it was reliable, so I could enjoy driving it. I would address any problems found.

 

I don't own a trailer and have driven my cars to all of the meets that I have attended and know guys that have driven their Ford products cross country by doing the things that I recommended here.

 

I believe that you can get the correct fuel line from Third Gen Auto   https://thirdgenauto.com/

Some radiator repair shops will service the tank for you.

 

Edited by 19tom40 (see edit history)
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The old fuel lines on these cars were ordinary steel, subject to rusting and corrosion.  i am replacing mine with a new 1/4" stainless steel line along with a new electric fuel pump to assist the engine in starting and running.  Some might say it's not the original type, but it's functionality that is the subject here and keeping things running.  Same with brake lines.  Yes cleaning out fuel tanks is important too since we can't get new replacement ones that also can be made of stainless steel. Any new stainless steel fuel tanks are just 'boxes' to hold fuel, not to mimic original tanks.  I don't like the idea of coating the inside of the fuel tank with coating material, it can in time break up and clog the system, that's what the filters are good at preventing.  But the nature of rusting steel, junk gas with ethanol that adds water to the gas is the big problem.  But remember these cars were never produced to last 100 years of which we've shown them can actually happen!   

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Properly applied tank coatings last a long time. If the surface is clean and the coating is applied in a coat thin enough to cover the tank and allowed to cure, you should have no problem with it. A common mistake is to drain the excess coating through the drain hole instead of the sending unit hole it the top of the tank. By draining the excess coating out the top of the tank, you leave the thicker coating in the area that is most exposed to air and H2O instead of the bottom where the fuel protects the tank. About 1/4 of a quart of Bill Hirsch's coating will do a 15 gal tank.

 

I coated the tank on my 40 Coupe in 1978 and it was still in good condition in 2005 when I decide to remove the dent in the bottom of the tank. The removal required heating the metal, so I had to remove the coating. After the repair, I re-coated the tank and have had not problems with the coating. That is 44 years of experience with tank coating without a problem.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...