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I've been reading through many of the posts related to repair of various issues on this car. You guys are scarring me to death to the point I'm considering selling it while it still runs perfectly.

I think many issues are caused by leaving the car to sit for long periods of time. I actually was happy to see that my vehicle had well over a hundred thousand miles on it, meaning that I knew it had been driven often. An oxymoron to most when looking for a classic.

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

I will run it every few days no matter. Provided the weather is clear and dry.

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1 hour ago, Plumbinguy said:

I've been reading through many of the posts related to repair of various issues on this car. You guys are scarring me to death to the point I'm considering selling it while it still runs perfectly.

I think many issues are caused by leaving the car to sit for long periods of time. I actually was happy to see that my vehicle had well over a hundred thousand miles on it, meaning that I knew it had been driven often. An oxymoron to most when looking for a classic.

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Hi, as I saw your concern, I went and checked the odometer on mine. This morning 7/29/20, it reads 288,203 miles. I have owned this car since it had 88,654 miles showing. 
I love driving this car, it has been cross-country many times, the first time to TC National in Indianapolis and around the track with all the other TCs that were there, to ‘Chrysler’s at Carlisle’, several times, up to my old hometown in northern NJ, visiting friends all along the east coast, down to Florida. 
It has been to TC Nationals since 1995. I have not found a more comfortable ‘driving’ car thinking back to cars I have owned. 
Of course some of our TCs are 32 years old now, as is mine. That would be like owning a Model T Ford in the 1950s.
Maintenance is the #1 requirement in order for anything to last this long. Having had my own auto repair shop since before buying this, my 1st TC, she has had the maintenance and repairs required since I got her.
So, you owning a TC or a 30+ year old Chevy or Ford, or any old car for that matter really depends on you and your desire to own and maintain it.
 

Don't be afraid to own a TC. It is like owning any other Chrysler product that old. Just take care of it the best you can. We are here to help if and when you need it.

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Posted (edited)

Hemi once again has offered great advice and information. The only reasons to be "scared" with I see with these cars is troubleshooting the Teves ABS system, body/trim parts availability, and mechanical bits for the 16 valve turbo. The rest is pretty much standard Chrysler and generally interchanges with most 80s-90s Front Drive Chrysler products. Like any "classic" car it's very wise to go through it with a fine tooth comb to prevent any possible issues (check hoses, belts, gaskets, wiring...etc). This club has an incredible knowledge base and all the information you could want for you or the mechanic you choose to service and repair your TC. I drive my TC every weekend now that it's summer, enjoy every single mile of it. 

Edited by Matthew Cody (see edit history)
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I agree with you as well as Hemi. In respect that the trick is maintainance. But I have noticed that just about any repair under the hood requires a lot of disassembly. Over the years I've lost faith in mechanics. I could write a book on the disasters. While I am naturally mechanical, I have not worked on cars since the advent of the computer. I know you guys would walk me through just about anything, which is great to know. And tools I have more than I know what to do with, less auto specialty equipment. Anyway thanx for the imput. Looking forward to working with you guys. Just not soon I hope.

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Compared to cars of the early 70's and prior, yes, these are "complex", but about as "simple" as this era gets, too. The biggest difference is the layout and the space in which you have to work. Beyond that, it's not really any more "difficult". The good thing is that these cars are fairly low maintenance once they are sorted. Yes, little stupid things *can* take a lot of disassembly work to fix, but overall that has been the exception and not the rule. Welcome! Don't be scared! These can be great cars!

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I do love the car, the uniqueness especially. Looked a long time for one. Owned to Labarons previously , best snow cars I've owned. Don't freak this one won't see weather. Just a response to another post. Other than being good in snow, I've always hated front wheel drive. Never room to work. Serious rot was there dimise. Just kidding about getting rid of it. 

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Seeing where you live is enough information about body-rot. I lived in Jersey so I am aware how even the subframe structure would rust out and torsion bar anchors would rip out of the 50s and 60s cars I worked on. I was happy when I moved to LA and found cars there without any signs of rust after 30 and more years.

Both my 2 vehicles and my wife's Dodge Shadow are rust-free

.2A4A1AE7-247A-4585-92C9-15FE1671F53C.thumb.jpeg.5253ab2d2bed059b3f6e5b9699bdf5e4.jpeg

1994 Dodge Shadow ES w/3.0L MMC engine and 5 speed manual.

 

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1985 Plymouth Voyager w/3.0L MMC v6 & 3 speed automatic.

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Go to Vegas every year, see many older cars clean as can be. If I had the time and the resources I would go to Arizona to car hunt. Still a couple of years away from retirement. Hoping I can keep this one trouble free till I have the time to do whatever work it needs now, and will undoubtedly need by than. Everything functions properly except the abs system. Stops true and strong as is, so don't plan on dealing with that any time soon. I'm aware all the parts are available. Would like to keep original, as opposed to changing to Lebaron system.

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3 hours ago, Plumbinguy said:

Go to Vegas every year, see many older cars clean as can be. If I had the time and the resources I would go to Arizona to car hunt. 

Let me know when you are headed for Vegas again, we might be able to meet somewhere in town. I often shop in Henderson at Costco, so I make the trip several times a year.

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16 hours ago, Hemi Dude said:

 

.2A4A1AE7-247A-4585-92C9-15FE1671F53C.thumb.jpeg.5253ab2d2bed059b3f6e5b9699bdf5e4.jpeg

1994 Dodge Shadow ES w/3.0L MMC engine and 5 speed manual.

 

2D54715F-B910-4656-A2D1-7800EF15E9FF_1_101_a.thumb.jpeg.b0f290103c4a75284478a879af78247c.jpeg

1985 Plymouth Voyager w/3.0L MMC v6 & 3 speed automatic.


Not trying to hijack this thread but Hemi I absolutely love that Shadow ES-best color/engine/transmission combo. I wish I could find a 4 door ES V6 5-speed. Also that minivan brings back a lot of memories. We had a 86 Voyager LE, black with woodgrain and the 2.6 Mitsubishi engine-never had any problems out of it.

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Typically I go every August for a billiards convention. Doesn't seem as though it's going to happen this year. When we do go, I'll make a point of meeting up. Might happen in November.

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