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STuTZ693

Trailer research

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OldsmoReo: this is a great idea and item which is sure to be popular. Imagine being able to monitor tire pressure and temperature while on the road. Trailer tires are generally the number 1 problem when towing. Please keep us posted on its release.

Larry: my 05 Bonneville does not have sensors that screw onto the stem. They are the normal plastic valve caps. I am assuming that if a tire is going down the wheel will start dragging and it is sensed through the ABS system? When you put air in any of the tires or rotate them you must reset the system.

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On some of the older vehicles the AntiLock braking system was used to measure tire pressure by looking at tire rotation. My understanding was the Gov't did not think that method was accurate enough and now requires the in tire sensors.

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I also run nitrogen in my truck and trailer tires, when they get hot (when driving accross the 130 degree desert in July) they have less chance of blow outs.

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I'll put my two cents in. Buying a trailer is like building a garage for your hobby. After it's built, you always want something a little bigger.

Go for the biggest trailer you can afford. 20-22 feet, however, makes for easier driving around town.

Go for trailer tires. There are threads here that strongly make the point.

I tried to buy used, but could not find a good price. Looked around a bit and bought a new one for a very reasonable price.

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When building an enclosed trailer to haul a large brass era car with the top up, how much clearance above the height of the car is required for "bounce" of the car. This is important because the trailer will be very tall say 7' -8' high so the allowance for bounce should be enough but no more. I am thinking that about 4" to 6" would be OK but is it too much or not enough?

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We own two trailers that have been both built to handle taller trucks. One was 12" over standard the other is 18" taller. The 18" taller stands every bit of 10 ' tall. Only once did I have an issue of a vehicle touching the center mounted ceiling lamps. It did no damage other than pop a lens cover off. The main reason was I had gotten lazy in checking my tie down straps and the last 50 miles of road were the worst. Keeping your straps tight and also how you bind your vehicles will make a big difference in bounce. If you tie the body down above the springs it will minimize the bounce. If to use tire or axle points you will get more movement.

Remember not to confuse ceiling height with door opening. Most trailer builders use a pulley and cam system for the tailgate lift. This causes some loss of height right at the door. Once you are past that point the ceiling can open up a great deal. Pick a roof style that gives you all the help it can, not flat.

Work with a good trailer dealer and he can work with the design department of the builder to get just what you are looking for.

Good luck

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Thanks for those comments regarding height however I should point out that I am designing and building the trailer myself. It will be a simpler unit than what I see used in US, (I am in Australia) and the rear opening will be full height so the question stands, is 6" enough clearance for "bounce" above the highest point of the car to the underside of the roof. I am not sure about tying the body of the car down, I planned to tie the wheels down leaving the car suspended on its springs. Any experience out there with tying the body down?

Also my car has a total loss lube system so it leaks oil worse than most. I am thinking of having an open mesh section in the floor under the drip areas but don't know whether this will suck in lots of dust from the road. I can pressurise the trailer a little by using a vent up front to force air in. comments would be appreciated.

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I would keep it an enclosed trailer and put a big drip pan on the floor to catch the oil. I have on in my trailer that set up with a drip pan. A hole in the floor will let a lot of road dirt in in my opinion.

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I understand that you want to build your own, but you shouldn't discount refurbishing a used trailer. I've just finished my third rehab of a boat and two work trailers. I took them completely apart, sand blasted the smaller parts and had everything hot dip galvanized. Installed new surge brakes and lines, updated LED lighting and will never, ever, have to paint them again.

I too, think the Equal-I-Zer weight equalizing hitch is the best. After nearly dying due to the failure of a POS Chinese hitch I figured out that my life is more important than my bank balance.

If you have an insane amount of time and no dial-up, check out the trailer I built. It's for sale for the right price.:D

http://cardomain.com/ride/340096/5

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Barry,

GREAT trailer and story. Love to see it in person some time. Might have some running lights if I can find them if you still need them.

Larry

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"I am thinking of having an open mesh section in the floor under the drip areas but don't know whether this will suck in lots of dust from the road. I can pressurise the trailer a little by using a vent up front to force air in"

I would think that having a hole in the floor would add a significant amount of drag ( and fuel costs) to the trailer when the rear door was up. The only alternative to that would be to make the rear door out of steel mesh. Apart from that, one of the reasons for having a closed trailer is to keep the car clean while it is being transported.

Having a hole in the floor will definitely let all the dust in that the tow car stirs up and if you ever get on any wet roads the inside of the trailer will be just as wet as the outside. JMO

David

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I would keep it an enclosed trailer and put a big drip pan on the floor to catch the oil. I have on in my trailer that set up with a drip pan. A hole in the floor will let a lot of road dirt in in my opinion.

I keep it at my shop in Redford, at 7-mile & Beech. C'mon by.

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"I would keep it an enclosed trailer and put a big drip pan on the floor to catch the oil. I have on in my trailer that set up with a drip pan. A hole in the floor will let a lot of road dirt in in my opinion."

Agreed, it was not a very good idea to leave a hole in the floor, thanks to the advice from all who responded.

Barry, Your restoration of that monster trailer made a good story. I note that it is for sale however not having a Mack or Kenworth to tow it I will stay with my little lightweight fully enclosed. All steel and axles have been ordered so work can now begin.

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Actually, it was last towed across the State of Michigan with a 1/2-ton Avalanche. Since the crash I've not been able to get back on the horse, so to speak. I drove behind it for about a half-hour and it never even wiggled.

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i am buying my first 24foot enclosed car trailer. can anyone let my know what brands are good or bad . i have read the posts and have gotten great info on size and opitions but there are so many brands and prices . i just what a safe trailer to go to meets 4 or 5 times a year.thanks for any help

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We have owned two Cargo Mates built by Forest River. They have both been good units. Having a safe trailer is more about who is pulling it and how. Maintenance is the number ONE safety requirement.

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Edited by msmazcol (see edit history)

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I had a Haulmark that I was completely satisfied with for 12 years. The only reason I traded was for more room and I wanted to try a gooseneck. Whatever brand you decide on I would stay away from Carlisle tires. This is strictly from my own experience.

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Just ordered an American Hauler Enclosed Falcon Model 22 footer with 10K rated torsion axles, radial tires, two spares, 80" rear door height, and side vents rather than roof.

Also had the factory add an electric tongue jack, winch, and D rings.

This is the first enclosed trailer I have purchased and took the advise of many of the guys that responded to the post.

I will let you all know what we think of the trailer once we get some miles on it.

I will haul our 3600 pound Stutz with a 2009 Ford F250 and will use sway and equalizer controls. The F250 has an integrated brake controller.

We will tow maybe 3 or 4 times a year.

Thanks for all of the good comments.

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Congratulations on your purchase! I'm sure you'll enjoy the trailer. Theres alot of peace of mind with an enclosed trailer. Sounds like you have a great tow vehicle also. Enjoy!

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Now that I finally got off my butt and ordered a trailer, any suggestions on how to keep it from being stolen?

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Keep it indoors. My stuff stays pristine.

You can buy block buidings for far less than they cost to build. Many people are buying industrial buildings and using them for storage. Buy more than you need, 'cause you'll fill it up. I know people that store their trailer with the car in it.

I don't think real estate is going to get a lot cheaper.

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We have a secure area when the trailer is not in use.

I was wondering more about when it is parked over night at a car show or in hotel parking lot.

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Keep it hooked to the tow vehicle with a padlock securing the hitch to the ball and the truck locked up and you will greatly reduce the chance of problems.

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Put good insurance on the trailer as well as the car inside of it. Remember people think their trailer is covered under their tow vehicle insurance policy.

It is as long as it is hooked to the tow. As soon as you unhook so does the insurance. We carry a free standing policy on the trailer.

An old bud of mine was a repo man for GMAC. There was not a car he could not open in 30 seconds. I've never forgotten that. If a pro wants it say goodbye.

IMHO

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