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joe_padavano

Truck capacity questions

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Here's a question that's always bothered me. My tow vehicle is a 1999 Chevy K3500 crewcab dually. The GVW of this truck is 9,900 lbs. The GCVW is 17,000 lbs. So far, so good. The part that bothers me is that the single wheel version of this truck has the same GVW and GCVW as the dually. Since the dual wheels add to the empty weight of the truck, the dually actually has slightly LESS cargo and trailer capacity as compared to the single wheel truck. What am I missing here? The dually has bigger brakes than the single wheel, more leaves in the rear springs, etc, but the GVW is the same. confused.gif

Now the fact that the GVW is 9,900 lbs and not 10,001 makes me think that it was held under 10,000 lbs on purpose and that the actual GVW capability is higher. Sort of like the factory horsepower ratings in the musclecar years. Unfortunately, that doesn't do me any good.

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Joe, I was waiting for someone with intelligence to answer your question, but......???

Those manufacturers posted weight limits are to me, guidelines only. I worry more about the capacity of the tires and springs. Properly inflated and "not overloaded" tires run cool, relatively speaking. A hot day will certainly make the tires warm. I guess I'm old fashioned, but I like to eyeball things. Correct spring capacity to me means that the springs aren't straightened out past their limit.

I know, I didn't answer your question at all. Where's the experts when you need them? crazy.gif

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Towing capacity is not just based on suspension and the number of tires on the road. The combined weight of the extra tires and wheels is subtracted from the towing capacity because you are using the same engnine, transmission, cooling system, etc to do the job.

More importantly, it is not a good idea to consider the maximum towing capcaity rating the manufacturer puts on the vehicle as just a guideline. If you exceed the rated combined weight and have a serious accident, the police will determine that your vehicle was overloaded and you could suffer serious legal problems.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Mark Shaw</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Towing capacity is not just based on suspension and the number of tires on the road. The combined weight of the extra tires and wheels is subtracted from the towing capacity because you are using the same engnine, transmission, cooling system, etc to do the job.

More importantly, it is not a good idea to consider the maximum towing capcaity rating the manufacturer puts on the vehicle as just a guideline. If you exceed the rated combined weight and have a serious accident, the police will determine that your vehicle was overloaded and you could suffer serious legal problems. </div></div>

I agree with all of that, which is why I asked the question. My dually has larger brakes, greater tire load capacity, and heavier springs than the single wheel K3500, but less net cargo and towing capacity. What's the benefit of the dual wheels then? Yes, the dually is a little more stable when pulling a large horse trailer, for example, but that alone doesn't justify the added weight and expense. (OK, it does look cooler, too... grin.gif)

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Joe,

The dual wheels will only provide greater load capacity in the truck bed and better traction when hauling loads; especially on loose gravel or dirt.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Mark Shaw</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Joe,

The dual wheels will only provide greater load capacity in the truck bed and better traction when hauling loads; especially on loose gravel or dirt. </div></div>

Uh, per your first post, no they won't. Let's recap. GVW for BOTH the single wheel and dual wheel K3500 is 9,900 lbs. The extra wheels and tires, the heavier springs, and the larger brakes all result in a heavier empty weight for the dually. Since GVW is fixed, NET cargo capacity is lower with the dually. What am I missing?

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According to the Chevrolet web site, the GVW for the 2008 single rear wheel 2WD 3500 is 9,900, and the dual wheel GVW is 11,404. Are you sure that your dually's GVW is only 9,900? I've owned a few Dodge Ram 2500s, and the GVW of those were 8,800, and my uncle had a 1985 GMC dually, and the GVW of that was 10,500. Your truck should have a higher GVW.

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<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Originally Posted By: Steve Braverman</div><div class="ubbcode-body">According to the Chevrolet web site, the GVW for the 2008 single rear wheel 2WD 3500 is 9,900, and the dual wheel GVW is 11,404.</div></div>

Which is why I specifically pointed out that the truck is a <span style="text-decoration: underline">1999</span>, which for the 3500 was still the old body style. GM increased the GVW when they changed the body style in 2001.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">Are you sure that your dually's GVW is only 9,900?</div></div>

Well, please see the attached photo of the door jamb sticker from my truck. Note that the door sticker says 10,000 lbs GVW, but other documentation says 9,900. Either way, my point remains. There is no increase in either GVW or GCVW with the dual rear wheels and the increase in vehicle empty weight results in a net DECREASE in cargo and towing capacity.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">I've owned a few Dodge Ram 2500s, ...</div></div>

Which unfortunately are not 1999 Chevy trucks...

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">...and the GVW of those were 8,800, and my uncle had a 1985 GMC dually, and the GVW of that was 10,500...</div></div>

Funny, because my 86 K30 crewcab dually also had a GVW of 10,000 lbs.

<div class="ubbcode-block"><div class="ubbcode-header">Quote:</div><div class="ubbcode-body">...Your truck should have a higher GVW. </div></div>

Unfortunately NOT according to GM.

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Do you think I was overloaded than !!!!!

I like the response to DRW --- they look cool -- also extra spare tires.

When hauling my backhoe home - I blew one tire - put on the spare --- some really rough highways in southern Minnesota -- the tread came off another rear tire ripping up one of the fiberglass fenders --- so now now spare --- so I continued home with just one tire one the rear one side.

I did weight the load : Weight Chev-TLB –5th Wheel

Truck Front Axle = 3900 lb

Truck Rear Axle - 6040 lb

Trailer Axles - 17820 lb

________________________

Total Gross Weight = 27,760 lb

Having fun any way.

---------------------------

It handled fine NO white knuckle driving at all.

I've had alittle more funny feeling a couple times when pulling my 24' Haulmark with my 1921 Dort set back to far over the axles giving a little fish tail. When pulling the same trailer and load with my F150 it has been white knuckle driving.

I like the DUALLY !!! smirk.gif

John

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