Tom Laferriere

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About Tom Laferriere

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    Senior Member
  • Birthday 01/17/1967

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    http://www.tomlaferriere.com

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  • Gender:
    Male
  • Location:
    Smithfield, RI
  • Interests:
    Cars!

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  • Biography
    Car Nut!

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  1. FS - 1941 Pacakrd 120

    I really like this car. Looks like a great driver.
  2. Series 115C. 100 bhp, 237 cu. in. L-head inline six-cylinder engine. Three-speed selective synchromesh manual transmission. Independent front coil-spring and semi-elliptic rear spring suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 115 in. Offered from a 40 year ownership Rumble seat with trunk. Used, enjoyed and maintained as needed for the past 40 years With its Fifteenth Series introduced in 1937, Packard offered its first six-cylinder car since 1927. Remarkably, the 100 horsepower 237 cubic inch L-head inline six-cylinder engine was capable of propelling the Packard Six down the highway at 100mph. Packard had entered the medium-price field in 1935 with its 120 model. Here is a six-cylinder version of what was essentially a 120. The Packard Six shared the same sheet metal and most of the mechanical components. With a 5-inch shorter wheelbase, the Packard Six has a shorter hood. The engine was basically a 120 Straight Eight less two cylinders. Less trim, and a blended interior fabric also helped differentiate it from the more powerful, larger 120. This Packard is known as the best running and driving 1937 Packard 115C Convertible Coupe on the planet by many. It is owned and cared for the last 40 years by a well known 1937 Packard enthusiast. No squeaks, rattles or shakes. Complete mechanical including recent engine rebuild, wiring harness, etc. All options, including 4.09 rear and 31” tall rear tires, artillery wheels. A true 60 MPH cruising speed with remaining power to pass, but if you are in more of a hurry, drive a Lexus. Some history and thoughts from the seller: On May 14, 1975, seller father purchased the car from Ellen Levernoch, widow of Ed Levernoch who we believe purchased the car in either late 1953 or January 1954. From 1975 to present this Packard has been known as “The Little Car” or “The Little Packard” within my family. This was because for many years, we also had a 39-120 convertible sedan which was, well, much larger. This is one of the best reasons to own/drive this car – it is not large, and does not feel large driving it. Most often driven with the top down, its really comfortable to zip around town, and park in about any space with ease. Anybody, and I mean anybody, can easily drive this car. My mother, now 80 years young, drives it as well as anyone. I have shocked many people by tossing them the keys and letting them drive the car. Many of my friends have had the car for extended periods. Its just a car, its fun, and is simple and reliable to drive. First and foremost, this is an honest car. It has never been disassembled, neglected, wrecked, burned, flooded, rusted or otherwise mistreated. Everything except the added modern accurate temperature gauge and electric fuel pump is correct and authentic. Fully optioned with banjo wheel, deluxe heater, clock, artillery wheels, etc. The engine was completely rebuilt in 2002, and the radiator recored at that time. The car does NOT overheat. I was caught in horrible traffic on a hot August afternoon for almost 2 hours this past summer, 103 in the shade. DID NOT OVERHEAT. The car is fitted with a 4.09 ratio rear end and 31” tall rear tires. This allows for an honest, comfortable highway speed of 60-65mph. This is as good as it gets in Pre-War Packards not fitted with overdrive. The car was re-sprayed in 2011 or 2012, new runningboard mats at that time. Its a good paint job, not show winning, simply shiny and respectable. Added the artillery wheels and diamondback radials at that time, and rechromed the front and rear bumpers. New wiring harness. New Bill HIrsch top in 2016, upholstery was mostly re-done at that time, everything except the seat cushions, which were done a few years before. Black inserts are modern fabric; leather or vinyl gets dangerously hot in the Dallas sun. Rumbleseat is red vinyl, neat and orderly. Go ahead, step on it when getting in/out of the rumbleseat, you’re not gonna hurt it. A rumbleseat is really just for kids anyhow. So why am I selling it? After 40 years of fun, I have another 37 convertible and I am in the mood for a different toy. Next owner…your Packard is ready. Located in Dallas, Texas and asking $64,500. More pictures at the link: http://www.tomlaferriere.com/listings/1937-packard-115c-convertible-coupe-2
  3. 1931 Ford Model A Truck

    Steve, you could share a link?
  4. I have enjoyed this Packard all of 2017, now its time to let it go to the next caretaker. I acquired the car from a 65 year family ownership. As the owner aged, he had power steering added so he could continue to drive and enjoy his beloved Packard. Older restoration with chips and scratches commensurate with a car thats been enjoyed and used for years. Gorgeous interior. Located in Smithfield, RI and I am asking $49,500. Tons of Pictures on the site. http://www.tomlaferriere.com/listings/1933-packard-eight-1001-sedan
  5. 1931 Ford Model A Truck

    1931 Ford Model A Pickup Chassis No. A4828484 40 bhp, 200.5 cu. in. L-head inline four-cylinder engine, three-speed manual transmission, solid front axle and live rear axle with transverse semi-elliptic leaf springs, and four-wheel mechanical drum brakes. Wheelbase: 103.5 in. Ford Motor Company entered the commercial vehicle market in 1905, with a Model C Delivery Car. It was what we would now call a panel van and had a so-called “C-cab,” for the open-front nature of its driving position. It was 1912 before a commercial car was added to the Model T catalog, but plenty of outsource firms and not a few handy owners managed to build cargo bodies, both open and closed, in the interim. A factory one-ton Model T chassis was introduced in 1917, but it was 1925 before a factory-built pickup was offered, not surprisingly of open-top design. By the time Model T production halted in 1927, the pickup model had acquired quite a following. It was natural, then, for a pickup to be included in the new Model A line in October 1927. In addition to the Open-Cab (or roadster) style of the Model T pickups, there was a Closed Cab model. They were designated 76-A and 82-A, respectively. The new Closed Cab was what we might call “phone booth” style, with angular corners and a high roof, though it retained the forward-sweeping “coupe pillar” of the passenger cars. Running changes to the chassis generally followed those of the passenger cars. When passenger Model As received a facelift for the 1930 model year, commercial styles lagged behind. It wasn’t until June of 1930 that new 76-B and 82-B pickup cabs were introduced, along with the taller radiators and higher hoods of the second generation restyle. The 82-B was given rounded corners, and the leatherette roof curved down to rain gutters atop the doors. In May 1931, the pickup beds of both 76-B and 82-B trucks was revised, wider than its predecessor and with straight sides and a full steel floor. This required narrower rear fenders. In August, the Closed Cab body was redesigned, with the roof now a single steel stamping, braced with stamped steel stiffeners in place of the wood bracing used previously. The new cabs were built by Briggs Manufacturing Company, a long-time supplier to Ford and other automakers. This handsome 82-B Closed Cab Pickup was acquired by its current owner, a prominent New England Model A collector, in September 2006. It had been restored by its previous owner to very high standards. Subsequent to that restoration, it received plaudits from the Model A Restorers Club, culminating in the Henry Ford Award, the Club’s most prestigious accolade. The current owner has maintained it fastidiously and campaigned it in AACA judging competition. It received AACA’s Grand National Senior First in 2012. Finished in Cigarette Cream, one of 38 colors offered in the commercial line, it has the standard Black-Brown artificial leather interior. Built in mid-November 1931, it has all the very late Model A features, including the indented firewall and re-designed fuel tank. Model A production tapered off at the end of 1931, although some assembly plants continued building until the Model 18 V8 and Model B four-cylinder cars made their appearance in March 1932. Commercial Model As seldom appear in the limelight, much less on the market. This late-model Closed-Cab Pickup represents a rare opportunity to acquire the best example of this very desirable model. Located in Smithfield, RI and asking $38,500 Full photos on the website: http://www.tomlaferriere.com/listings/1931-ford-model-truck
  6. 1941 Buick Roadmaster Convertible Sedan

    Goodness, I have added it. Thank you.
  7. 1941 Buick Roadmaster Convertible Sedan Chassis No. 24178041 Series 70. 320-cid, 165-bhp inline ohv eight-cylinder engine, three-speed manual transmission, coil spring independent front suspension, live rear axle with coil spring suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 126 in. Introduced in the mid-1930s as a more comfortable alternative to the open phaeton or touring car, the convertible sedan soon faded from public favor. After 1940, the model all but disappeared, except at General Motors. For 1941, The General offered them in no fewer than three marque lineups, Oldsmobile, Buick and Cadillac. Built by GM’s Fisher Body subsidiary, they were based on a common understructure but given marque-specific sheet metal where necessary to preserve corporate president Alfred Sloan’s dictum of a “car for every purse and purpose.” They were the last of this rare breed, disappearing after World War II halted production. Post-war, production centered on mass market styles to fulfill pent-up demand. Not until Kaiser and Frazer’s tentative effort in 1949 to 1951, did the convertible sedan return, reaching significant levels only with the legendary Lincoln Continentals of 1961-67. The big news at Buick in 1941 was compound carburetion. Standard on upper series and optional on Specials, it used a pair of two-barrel carburetors. The front carburetor functioned all the time, each barrel feeding four cylinders. The rear carb, with only a float system and jets, came into play during acceleration and at high speeds, when its barrels worked in parallel with those of the front carb. The system was used in 1941 and ’42 only. Production of these convertible sedans was in very small quantities. Buick alone offered them in more than one series, the 51C Super and 71C Roadmaster, both designated Convertible Phaetons. The car being offered is the 120th body built out of 326 Roadmasters for 1941, or 834 Buick Convertible Phaetons in all. Built in Buick’s plant in Southgate, California, it was purchased by the current owner from a gentleman in Iowa. Previous owners hailed from Arizona and California. The car bears a service sticker from the Los Angeles area. It received a cosmetic restoration a number of years ago and is beginning to show its age. The blue paint exhibits a good shine, and the red leather interior is in great shape. The engine compartment is nicely detailed. The engine itself was completely rebuilt by Mason Automotive in North Scituate, Rhode Island, new bearings, camshaft, rocker arms, valves and hardened valve seats for operation with today’s fuel. The Compound Carburetion components were rebuilt by Buick specialist Doug Seybold in Ohio, resulting in smooth acceleration throughout its speed range. The car handles well on wide whitewall radial tires. The odometer shows fewer than 45,000 miles, the status of which is unknown. Other equipment includes a Buick Sonomatic radio and antenna. The convertible sedan body style still has considerable cachet, and the Buick is a fine example. The Roadmaster version was, apart from the Limited Formal Sedan, the scarcest 1941 Buick. This one is bound to please a discerning new owner. Located in Smithfield, RI Did I hear that CCCA is considering Buick Roadmasters into the club?
  8. 1941 Buick Roadmaster Convertible Sedan Chassis No. 24178041 Series 70. 320-cid, 165-bhp inline ohv eight-cylinder engine, three-speed manual transmission, coil spring independent front suspension, live rear axle with coil spring suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 126 in. Introduced in the mid-1930s as a more comfortable alternative to the open phaeton or touring car, the convertible sedan soon faded from public favor. After 1940, the model all but disappeared, except at General Motors. For 1941, The General offered them in no fewer than three marque lineups, Oldsmobile, Buick and Cadillac. Built by GM’s Fisher Body subsidiary, they were based on a common understructure but given marque-specific sheet metal where necessary to preserve corporate president Alfred Sloan’s dictum of a “car for every purse and purpose.” They were the last of this rare breed, disappearing after World War II halted production. Post-war, production centered on mass market styles to fulfill pent-up demand. Not until Kaiser and Frazer’s tentative effort in 1949 to 1951, did the convertible sedan return, reaching significant levels only with the legendary Lincoln Continentals of 1961-67. The big news at Buick in 1941 was compound carburetion. Standard on upper series and optional on Specials, it used a pair of two-barrel carburetors. The front carburetor functioned all the time, each barrel feeding four cylinders. The rear carb, with only a float system and jets, came into play during acceleration and at high speeds, when its barrels worked in parallel with those of the front carb. The system was used in 1941 and ’42 only. Production of these convertible sedans was in very small quantities. Buick alone offered them in more than one series, the 51C Super and 71C Roadmaster, both designated Convertible Phaetons. The car being offered is the 120th body built out of 326 Roadmasters for 1941, or 834 Buick Convertible Phaetons in all. Built in Buick’s plant in Southgate, California, it was purchased by the current owner from a gentleman in Iowa. Previous owners hailed from Arizona and California. The car bears a service sticker from the Los Angeles area. It received a cosmetic restoration a number of years ago and is beginning to show its age. The blue paint exhibits a good shine, and the red leather interior is in great shape. The engine compartment is nicely detailed. The engine itself was completely rebuilt by Mason Automotive in North Scituate, Rhode Island, new bearings, camshaft, rocker arms, valves and hardened valve seats for operation with today’s fuel. The Compound Carburetion components were rebuilt by Buick specialist Doug Seybold in Ohio, resulting in smooth acceleration throughout its speed range. The car handles well on wide whitewall radial tires. The odometer shows fewer than 45,000 miles, the status of which is unknown. Other equipment includes a Buick Sonomatic radio and antenna. The convertible sedan body style still has considerable cachet, and the Buick is a fine example. The Roadmaster version was, apart from the Limited Formal Sedan, the scarcest 1941 Buick. This one is bound to please a discerning new owner. Located in Smithfield, RI and asking $59,500 Did I hear that CCCA is considering Buick Roadmasters into the club?
  9. 1938 Packard 1603 Super Eight Sedan

    1938 Packard 1603 Super Eight Touring Sedan VIN 501-507 Engine No. A501507 130 bhp, 320 cu. in. L-head inline eight-cylinder engine, three-speed manual transmission, independent coil spring front suspension, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 127 in. By 1938, Packard’s “junior” Six and One-Twenty lines accounted for most sales; in fact the One-Twenty name was dropped as the model took up the name “Eight,” previously reserved for the least-expensive “senior” line. A full array of “senior” eight-cylinder cars remained, however, in the Super Eight series, with no fewer than 17 body styles, including four “catalog custom” styles from coachbuilders Brunn and Rollston. The Series 1603 Super Eight Touring Sedan was unique in the 1938 line. On the 127-inch wheelbase of the junior cars, it had the 320 cubic inch, 130 bhp Super Eight engine. At 4,530 pounds, it was the lightest of the Super Eight offerings and no doubt exhibited the best performance. Priced under $3,000, it was a relative bargain. This 1603 Packard Touring sedan has been in single-family ownership since the 1970s. Well-known collector Ken Stein had it restored by Eastern Coach Restoration in Sayville, Long Island, New York, winning a first Junior National AACA First prize at Jekyll Island, Georgia, in November 1979. After the Steins moved from North Carolina to Arizona in 1985, the car has been kept in climate-controlled storage since completion, but was little used. It has recently been recommissioned for the road. Invoices for this work, which ran to some $10,000, accompany the car, and show parts obtained from Max Merritt Auto in Franklin, Indiana, as well as the work performed (copies available). It now runs and drives well. Of Mr. Stein’s collection, which at one time numbered a dozen cars, this was his wife’s favorite, so was never sold. Even on close inspection it’s difficult to tell that the restoration is nearly forty years old, a testament to the quality of the work. The paint, in two shades of gray, polishes up well, and the matching cloth interior is all but unworn. In addition to a capacious luggage compartment, the car has an external trunk rack. The exterior trunk is included in the sale. In 1938, Packard used a firewall decal for vehicle numbers. These frequently do not survive, whether or not a car has been restored. This car, like many other 1938s, is titled by its engine number. A cowl-mounted plate shows delivery on August 14, 1938 by John R. Swezey of Patchogue, New York. Subsequent to the car’s AACA award, the electrical system was converted to 12 volts, and remains so today. Total production of 1938 Packard Super Eights fell short of 2,500 cars. Some years ago the total of Series 1603 Touring Sedans was estimated by Canadian registrar Arthur James at some 55 cars, of which 23 were known to survive. This one is bound to please a new owner with iconic elegance and turn-key performance. Located in Salvo, NC and asking $39,500
  10. 1927 Hudson Touring in GC on CL inVT.

    I love it!
  11. 1925 Pierce Arrow Model 33

    It did sell quickly.
  12. 1928 Cadillac 431 4-Dr Imperial Cab Sedan

    Hurry on this one!
  13. 1925 Pierce Arrow Model 33

    Off to eBay it goes. Its really a great car for a Speedster with the New York front. eBay auction link
  14. 1925 Pierce Arrow Model 33

    Engine running. IMG_4292.MOV.mov