Randiego

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About Randiego

  • Rank
    Junior Member
  • Birthday 10/19/1949

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    randy@americanarbortreeservice.com

Profile Information

  • Gender:
    Male
  • Location:
    Oceanside, California
  • Interests:
    1936 Plymouth P2 Tudor Touring Sedan , 1936 Pontiac Master 6 Coupe, 1977 & 73 Fiat 124 Spiders, 1960 Ford F100, 1978 Triumph 750 Bonneville, 1968 & 72 Honda Trail 90s, Starflight Ultra Light, 72 Simplicity 4041 Power Max Tractor 1938 El Monte walk behind garden tractor, 1956 17' Mahogany cuddy cabin cruiser (restored) with 1958 Mercury 48 HP (restored) Outboard

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  • Biography
    I have been in and around automobiles all my life. Starting with my brothers Model A Ford in 1957, progressing through various cars through my youth (Oh but to have some of the cars back!) I had a 36 Pontiac Business Coupe that only had 11K miles on it and a 50 Mercury coupe, a 49 Packard 2Dr. Fastback, 55 Ford Crown Vic., Plymouth Furry, 55 Chevy, 4 (bought 3 for less than a hundred dollars!)57 Chevy coupes, 70 Pontiac Bonneville, 1960 MGA (Migrated to California in that car). I purchased a 77 FIat Spider new (when I was working for a dealership here in San Diego) Recently, I just sold a 1972 Chevrolet Caprice Coupe with 25K original miles. IT was a pristine car that showed like NEW! It now resides in Qutar purchased by an emir three years ago. I am now involved with FIAT 124 Spiders. My daily driver is a 78 and I am restoring a 73 with a race motor. I restored 2 Triumph Bonneville Motorcycles. I kept the 78 (better road bike) and ride it through the San Diego back country. I am undertaking rebuilding a Starflight Ultralight that I inherited from my brother. In general, I love all around mechanics and working on anything.
  1. Is that an older hydramatic? As a young lad, I worked in a transmission shop, as a R & R tech. (remove and replace). My first Dyna Flo was almost my last. I usually did not take the time to get a transmission jack as they were not that heavy and it was quicker to retrieve them this way. I was used to going under a Plymouth or a Chevy or Ford and dropping the transmission on my chest and rolling out from under the car with it. (at 19 years of age, you are invincible and much stronger than when you are older). .Well, I had not been told that the Dyna Flo was composed of a CAST IRON case and a hell of a lot heavier. I slipped the transmission off of the bell housing and WHUMP ! on to my chest immediately expelling all of the air in my lungs. I could not call out to anyone for help. All I could do was flail my legs and finally one of my fellow workers saw me, grabbed my legs and pulled me out from under that Buick with the tranny still sitting on my chest. I was blue in the face by the time that they lifted the trans off of me. An important life lesson I learned that day. Anyway, I just thought that I would share that story with you for a good chuckle. Hope that your vacation was nice and relaxing. We await to see some more magic, Roger. Randy
  2. Roger must be busy. I am awaiting the transformation of the wood parts into the bench seats for the Continental. I am wondering how he is going to get the little "springs" to fit in the frames. :-) Of course, there will not be any such items. It will be interesting to see how he attaches the leather and if there is an under-lament before the leather is attached. Roger, are you going to sew into the leather the patterns of the seats like the 1:1 Continental? Or how are you going to simulate the stitching? We are awaiting your magic. Randy
  3. Roger, Silicons hit on something that I was pondering after seeing several Continentals show up at our car club meeting here in Rancho Santa Fe, CA. One was a light blue with white interior, another was black with a black interior (both original and very well preserved). The third was a copper metallic with a copper/white interior. VERY STRIKING. IT was completely restored and was perfect. I do not know if it (the copper) was an original color selection for the mid 50's offered to the buyer. The owner of the car had stepped away and I did not get a chance to ask him. I had a 1965 Lincoln Continental 2 dr. Sedan back in the 70's that was a trade in at the local Lincoln/Mercury dealership. It had 38,000 miles on it and I paid $800.00 for the car. It was in perfect condition with the paint starting to fade. But after I buffed it out, it looked great. It was a copper/bronze metallic color with the same color scheme for the interior. No contrast so I got tired of it and sold it. Used cars were very inexpensive back then. If I had just hung onto a few of the cars that I owned...................................................:-( With a 1:12 scale, the color is a tough choice. I keep harking back to the time that I was in Jr. High. Our local doctor had purchased the Continental for his "Sunday" car for the family outings. It was a light, sky blue with a white interior. Extremely striking. Even though it was 10 years old, it still had more class going down the road that any newer car. It was timeless in design and sophistication. The light sky blue stuck in my memory to this day. Roger, I do not know if it is a tough decision for you. One that you have been pondering for quite some time, after spending 7-8 years on the car, paint it the color that YOU like. What ever color you choose, I am sure that you will get it right. It is nice of you to ask our opinions for feed back. I had one heck of a time picking the color for my Spider till I saw a car zzooooming by me on the freeway. I sped up and saw the Toyota badge on the trunk. Right then and there, I drove to the dealership and pinned down the color. Nautical Metallic Blue. Not an original FIAT color but striking. Now I have the car painted and with a bone colored leather interior, it is very nice. This car is a class act 1:1 or 1:12th scale. It must be very hard for you to select the color and the feedback may help. If I had to opt for a color, I would go with the grey but not so dark. Maybe a little lighter shade of Metallic Grey. And coupled with the burgundy leather interior. STRIKING ! I hope that you are able to find the metalic paint with a smaller metal flake. Do you have Testors or Tamaya available? I am sure that they are available in the hobby stores. With the hobby paint, I am sure that they have the metallic with the smaller flake in the paint for a more scale application. And a local auto paint store can take the paint and put it in an aerosol "shaker" can for you. That way, you have the comfort level of using a spray can. Just a thought. It is exciting to know that you are at this stage. The completion is just around the corner.........................................WOW. Randy
  4. Roger, I would love to see you installing the interior components once the car is painted. Please post pictures of the step by step of the re installation of the interior parts so we can get an idea as to how you re assemble the car. Man o man, that will be one intricate process with all the little screws holding the parts together. You MUST have a "shrinking" machine where you step in and step out 1:12 scale to do that job. :-) I realize that the windows and doors are not installed but still.............what a job to put all the parts in the car with the roof on. AND not to scratch the exterior finish while doing so. This we have got to see............. Randy
  5. Roger, WOW ! I hope that you can get all the interior parts in without too much difficulty. It sure is easier when you have full access. But you know what you are doing. It baffles the mind to know that this car is only 1:12. From the pictures, if the car was sitting on jack stands and posed in a garage with proper perspective, now way would anyone be the wiser to the actual size of the car due to the intricate detail. Simply amazing. How did the headliner come out. The last pic of the headliner looked pretty good. Is that the final? Guess so as the roof is now attached to the body. My nightmare would be getting over spray on the inside of the headliner. :-( I am quite sure that you are very careful with the painting. You say that you are using "rattle can" paint? No air brush? (just kidding). At our local automotive paint store, they can put your special color mix in an aerosol can. That was not available too long ago. Now for small jobs, I can get the paint in an aerosol can as it is a pain to clean up my spray gun. I have to take it all apart and clean it thoroughly or the next time I use it...................... :-( Nothing like hard encrusted paint to clog a small orifice and stop the function of an expensive gun. Roger, I am going to attempt to do the body and paint on my 36 Plymouth fenders. The body shops here are sooooo damn expensive. I decided to bite the bullet and attempt to do my fenders. The body of the car is fine. I just need to do the fenders and the bullet headlight shells. There is no rust on them but I have to strip off two bad paint jobs. The last guy didn't do that and the finish is all crazed and unsightly. Plus he didn't put the welting between the fender and the body. The headlight "bullet" shells have scratches from previous owners or mechanics that were not deft in proper opening and closing of the hoods on both sides and have scratched and dented (one shell) the shells. I think that I can do them in place with just removing the lense one the one that I have to knock out the dent and then finish sand and prep them for paint. They would be a pain to remove from the fender mounts. Those and the fenders. Probably will take me as much time to do as you have invested in the Continental. :-) Kidding. I just have a few bumps to knock out and the alignment is fine. I have a brand new high end spray gun that I bought just for this. Have you ever done any body and paint on your cars? Wish me luck Randy
  6. Roger, The hood ornament looks very good. Only your eyes will see a flaw. Once you get the part filed and final sanding and plated, the emblem will look like a million on the hood. The headliner really looks authentic Like you say, will anybody really be looking up at the headliner once the roof is attached? I cannot wait to see the car with the exterior painted and peering into the engine bay, looking at all the detailing. Very heady stuff Roger. Excellent ! !
  7. Roger, The problem(s) with the 3M aerosol product is that you have to have the fabric positioned EXACTLY before you press it into the headliner. Once it touches the glue, it is nigh on impossible to move it and the glue is almost instant. plus you have overspray that has to be cleaned up. I may have a solution to your adhesive. The product is called Aleene's Original Tacky Glue. It is all purpose and when applied in a thin coat it shouldn't come through the satin or fabric. It is used by crafts people gluing fabric and most everything. Since the California Air Resources Board has banned most products that have lacquers or spirits the industries have had to come up with water based products. Aleene's is a water based product and clean up is easy. Also it is not aerosol. It comes in a bottle or a tube and you can experiment with the fabric to see how it will work. If you local craft shops there do not have it, let me know. I will pick up a bottle and ship it to you. I use this product for a lot of my needs. It is used here extensively in the crafts hobbies. It is made by Duncan Enterprises here in Fresno California. I was first turned onto this product in my scale model railroad hobby. The guys used it to attach the track to the road bed without using nails (on N scale). The good thing about the glue is that if you want to remove the item or cloth, it will release without tearing up what you are gluing it to. It is water based and it should not damage your poly roof liner. With this glue, it dries clear and you have the ability to move or "position" the fabric before the glue dries. Doing a small area at a time will allow you to get good results. Email me and let me know. I will swing by the crafts store tomorrow (The 11th) and pick up a bottle or tube. Hopefully, this will solve your problem. Randy
  8. Roger, Under the magnifying glass (the forum watchers) of the public, you are producing magic. Like at a magic show, we, the audience, are always awaiting the next trick that you pull out of your hat. Those are TINY parts. Finishing the emblems for the plating company will be fun ! They are so minute, if there are any flaws, they will not be noticeable, only to you. One day, there will not be any more parts to make or parts to prep and paint. This story is an excellent diversion from our daily lives. We check in here and get our "dose" of Roger's Magic. You wow us all. Randy
  9. Roger, Cutting the lettering for the Continental is spot on. IF you were to enlarge them, they would match the 1:1 car. I do not envy you finishing them (final filing, sanding and polishing) for the plating company. I was working on a very minute turnbuckle (1:50 scale for a Military Flat Car with a WW II Sherman Tank as the payload. When I get it done, I will send you a pic). I spent 1 hour working on the tiny hooks to secure the load and spent an additional hour and a half on my hands and knees looking for the parts that I dropped (several times) :-( I am going to put down a white sheet next time I do something like this. Irritating. We are all awaiting to see how the headliner will come out. Nice to know that the weather is starting to change back to Spring time. Not there yet but coming. We here in San Diego almost washed away. More rain in Southern California that has been here since the early 90's. We broke rainfall records and we are not done with the rainy season yet. So much for living in a "desert". Always in Awe and respect for your craft, Randy
  10. This is for JPage, Going with 1:6 Scale allows you to get into more detail as the engine is larger. There is a guy, Louis Chenot who absolutely blew us all away with his 1:6 scale Duesenberg Phaeton. His engine RAN and I have attached the clip on U Tube showing it running. I live in Carlsbad but when he was here demonstrating the engine at the Joe Martin's "Craftsmanship Museum", I had the flu and was not able to attend. First Run of Lou Chenot's 1/6 scale Duesenberg engine - YouTube You can also see his car on You tube too. He completed the Duesenberg and won the "Craftsmanship of the Decade" award from the Joe Martin foundation. Joe Martin has passed but his company, Sherline tools, is still in business. With no heirs, he left a good part of it in Trust for perpetuity. The Museum houses a beautiful array of hand made model engines, airplanes, trains, boats, steam engines, etc., etc. If you are ever in So Cal, don't miss this museum. It is a living museum with craftsmen working in the back showing visitors the operation of their tooling (Lathes, milling machines, etc. etc. and they are actively working on different projects and models. Worth a visit. Louis has "lent" his Duesenberg to the museum and it is on display. He is now working on a 1:6 scale Garwood with a Liberty engine. Don't know if the engine will be running but knowing him, it probably will. So, J Page, (didn't get your name) is this engine going into a 1:6 scale automobile or truck? Or are you just doing the engine/transmission? The quality of your replication is spot on. Kudos to you. For Roger, we just got the pictures back on the Forum. They were upgrading or ? and all of the pictures were not attached and we could not see the progress for over a week. But they are back now and now we can see what you have been up to and what JPage was talking about as we could not see what he had attached. Looking forward to the next post. Randy
  11. Roger, I noticed the drive belt on one of the engine pulleys. I was going to ask what material you are using to make the "V" belts on the engine? Is that a very small "O Ring" that you are using? Not that any one would know as they will be only visible from atop. But knowing you, you probably have thought this through and have come up with a solution that is applicable for the engine drive belts. I hope that you are having a "mild" winter and that Spring will be coming soon. As soon as the weather is nice, we are looking forward to seeing the polyester work on the roof. It is just amazing how you are attending to ALL the details as some are not even seen, being hidden by fender liners, bulkheads, kick panels, etc., etc. But YOU know that the details are there, and so do we (Who have been following this build for the last 7 years). The postings are a highlight when I go to your site. Always looking for what you have done next. The bumpers and the grill look amazing. It will be nice to see them assembled and installed on the car at the appropriate time. This may be a silly question but do you keep track of the hours spent working on the Continental? Do you have a log that you keep? After building the Toronado and the Avanti, I was just wondering if you logged the actual time spent at the bench. Phenomenal work as always. Randy
  12. Oh the complexity of 12 scale ! The best laid plans of mice and men............ But we have confidence in your abilities. When you get the windshield wiper assemblies figured out, that will be a major accomplishment. Looking back, the window switches and motors were a "snap" in comparison. It seems that every time that you attack a problem, two more rise to get in the way of your progress. And people wonder why it takes years to get such a model/masterpiece completed. Lots of "trial and error" before you can get on to the next item. When a 1:1 car is engineered at the factory, there is a team of designers, draftsmen, mock up groups, just to get the parts to come together. And here you are doing this by yourself. For any who wonder why this is monumental, just get any simple model kit of a car and assemble it. Even though the parts are all there, for fit and finish, it still takes a trained eye and skill to put those kits together to make them look like the picture on the box. Now step back and try to do that same model from scratch...............................you will quickly get the picture what Roger is up against. And his model is in COMPLETE detail of the real car. Unlike any kit in a box. Even the Pocher kits don't come close. We are in awe. Randy
  13. Oh the complexity of 12 scale ! The best laid plans of mice and men............ But we have confidence in your abilities. When you get the windshield wiper assemblies figured out, that will be a major accomplishment. Looking back, the window switches and motors were a "snap" in comparison. It seems that every time that you attack a problem, two more rise to get in the way of your progress. And people wonder why it takes years to get such a model/masterpiece completed. Lots of "trial and error" before you can get on to the next item. When a 1:1 car is engineered at the factory, there is a team of designers, draftsmen, mock up groups, just to get the parts to come together. And here you are doing this by yourself. For any who wonder why this is monumental, just get any simple model kit of a car and assemble it. Even though the parts are all there, for fit and finish, it still takes a trained eye and skill to put those kits together to make them look like the picture on the box. Now step back and try to do that same model from scratch...............................you will quickly get the picture what Roger is up against. And his model is in COMPLETE detail of the real car. Unlike any kit in a box. Even the Pocher kits don't come close. We are in awe. Randy
  14. Oh the complexity of 12 scale ! The best laid plans of mice and men............ But we have confidence in your abilities. When you get the windshield wiper assemblies figured out, that will be a major accomplishment. Looking back, the window switches and motors were a "snap" in comparison. It seems that every time that you attack a problem, two more rise to get in the way of your progress. And people wonder why it takes years to get such a model/masterpiece completed. Lots of "trial and error" before you can get on to the next item. When a 1:1 car is engineered at the factory, there is a team of designers, draftsmen, mock up groups, just to get the parts to come together. And here you are doing this by yourself. For any who wonder why this is monumental, just get any simple model kit of a car and assemble it. Even though the parts are all there, for fit and finish, it still takes a trained eye and skill to put those kits together to make them look like the picture on the box. Now step back and try to do that same model from scratch...............................you will quickly get the picture what Roger is up against. And his model is in COMPLETE detail of the real car. Unlike any kit in a box. Even the Pocher kits don't come close. We are in awe. Randy
  15. Roger, only a trained eye would know the difference in the size of the rear screen. in the Mark (full size), was the screen for "exit air" or for air coming into the cabin? This car was ahead of it's time ! Almost a Raymond Lowey imprint on automotive design. Very advanced for the 50's. Are you using French glove leather for the interior? I understand that they have the thinnest leather for this kind of work. Looking forward to your next post. I will be in St. Louis over Christmas and Geoff and I will be looking at your posts to see what other gem we can view of the progress. Merry Christmas to you. Randy