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1990 v. 1991 Reatta


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I have an opportunity to purchase either a 1990 Reatta with sunroof or a 1991 Reatta without a sunroof. The 1990 has a CD but it needs repairing. The 1991 has a working cassette player. Both have about the same mileage and are in about the same condition. The colors are different. Both are about the same price. The 1990 is located closer to my house but the 1991 can be delivered to within a short distance away (by the owner). Any thoughts or how to choose other than personal preference? Many thanks. [color:\\"green\\"] confused.gif

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You are one lucky Bastard!!! tongue.gif I am sooo jealous!!

Go for the 91. No question. Those of us with the 90's have to forever question the "disappearing brake" problem (losing without indication due to the anti-lock system). Though I love my '90 to death, should something happen to her, I'll be looking for a '91 conv. or coupe. Also, '91s have more value in the long run, and if I remember correctly, a bit more power and the ability to take the Series II 3800 engine as a replacement. Also, let me not forget the fact that it has a stronger, electronically controlled transmission.

Hope this helps.

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Nothing wrong with either year. I don't think that any single improvement on the 1991 makes them better, but all the improvements combined does. The '91 is the better choice, all things being equal.

I would also appreciate you sending me the vins, colors and options on both cars.

PS If the '91 is blue/blue and low mileage, I will hate you for buying it.

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I agree w/ consul. 1.

All are great cars but the brake issue is resolved in the 91. If not, I would rather have an 88 or 89.

Properly serviced and maintained the Brakes of earlier models will probably incur no problems other than an accumulator failure, almost certain sometime in their future. Unfortunately a small number will experience a failure with possibly no warning.

Most failures, a large majority, seem to have occured because of lack of maintenance, not flushing and ignoring warning signs such as lights coming on intermittantly. When the accumulator fails the pump runs excessively and can/will fail causing complete failure.

Test and flush!

It is true, you have normal brakes even tho the yellow light stays on(sans antilock) but if the accumulator is failing/has failed, you will not see the yellow light come on briefly when there is low pressure and the pump runs excessively. Fix the yellow light problem!

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Think it would be more accurate to say the accumulator "wears out" than "fails". Is really a sealed balloon and eventually the air (nitrogen) seeps out. The critical point seems to be about ten years.

I replaced mine last year and just checked the drop - right on 1/2" from hard pedal to full charge. All times and pumps pass the tests.

We have seen three cases reported of what seems to be a unique failure mode of the TEVES which I suspect is the result of the main valve sticking open: full force of the charge (around 2000 psi) pushing back on the brake pedal and no braking.

For this reason it is a good idea to periodically flush the brakes, particularly if the car is stored outside north of the Mason-Dixon line (large temperature swings with moisture present). This is another reason I like to run the engine cooler than factory, less under hood excursions.

Also remember to check "test 7" every time you start the car: when the key is turned on or a few seconds after starting you will feel a thump in the brake pedal. This is the main valve cycling during self-test.

If the yellow light is on it could be a large number of things but one of them is the main valve failing this test. Check your codes.

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Seeps out? Possibly/probably. I certainly don't know. Gives me a headache trying to think about it.

If it does seep out over time it would explain the different reading obtained on some tests-time to recharge-# of pumps to hard pedal-etc. Unfortunately the new accumulator 800 psi precharge is evidently an estimated figure w/ a lot of variance.

The reason I find it hard to grasp, seeping out over time, is it seems with any leak at all from the precharge through the diaphragm, when there is zero pressure resisting, that 800 or even 500 psi would expell most nitrogen almost immediately? Experts?

No more than 1/2 inch drop and rise in fluid level does seem to be a reliable indicator of a fully functional accumulator..

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