Eclector

Penrite vs Meropa (Lub164)

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I am looking to start fresh with some new trans oil in my '24 DB Roadster. I've been reading the various forum articles and a lot of folks seem to like the Meropa 1500 product that is repackaged as Lub164 as sold by Restoration Supply Co in CA. I've also read favorable comments about Penrite T-250. As far as I can tell, both products seem to be in the same viscosity range LUB164 is an ISO 1500 and Penrite is an SAE 250. Restoration Supply Co. sells both although, the Penrite product is significantly more. I don't know enough about oil specs to know if one product has a clear advantage over the other. I need someone to help me clarify the data as it pertains to these old gearboxes.  Thank you.   

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ISO 1500 is at the very viscous end of the SAE 250 viscosity band.

 

Meropa 1500 contains EP additives for hypoid gears. You don't really need them; you don't have hypoid gears. What is its API GL- rating? I can't see it. It also has anti-oxidant additives and viscosity stabilisers.

 

The Penrite T250 is a basic non-additive oil. It should be adequate with relative frequent changes but an additive oil would be more stable in viscosity with temperature and slower to oxidise, meaning it will last a lot longer than T250. I would not use it in my 1930 Dodge 8.

 

Is there any brass in the gearbox? I am thinking of bushes inside the countershaft gear, for example? If so, the Copper Strip Corrosion Test (ASTM D130) result becomes important. The Meropa 1500 has a result of 1B. A result of 1A would be better if there is copper in the gearbox.

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If you can notice the difference in a 24 dodge then you are doing well:). From what I can tell the choice between the two is probably more one of availability and personal preference than anything else - both seem to have plenty of use with no issues.  Most of our cars have lasted 90+ years probably with sub standard lube for a great period as well as poor change schedule.  With the love they get these days either of the above oils is likely to see them going for another 90+ years.

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2 hours ago, Spinneyhill said:

Spinneyhill, thanks for your comments. This is the type of info that I am looking for. I see that you have responded to many discussions on lubrication, I defer to your experience and knowledge in this area. As far as yellow metals or copper, I have no idea what might be in my stock transmission. I'm not even sure where I would go to find out. What I have been able to gather from the post history on this subject, is that a more viscous material is preferred. Some folks are using the 600 W oil marketed to the Model A crowd. I don't believe that it is a traditional 600 steam cylinder oil.  Some are mixing 1 qt of 600 W and 2 tubes of grease. I understand that this may be traditional but it may not be the best solution given today's lubricants. Another option is that Green Velvet offers both a 600 and a 1500 steam cylinder oil. In reading up about steam cylinder oil, I fail to see how it would be a better solution than the Meropa. To be honest, it all gets somewhat overwhelming. Are there other viable options or should I just say screw it and order the Meropa?

 

 

2 hours ago, Spinneyhill said:

 

 

 

ISO 1500 is at the very viscous end of the SAE 250 viscosity band.

 

Meropa 1500 contains EP additives for hypoid gears. You don't really need them; you don't have hypoid gears. What is its API GL- rating? I can't see it. It also has anti-oxidant additives and viscosity stabilisers.

 

The Penrite T250 is a basic non-additive oil. It should be adequate with relative frequent changes but an additive oil would be more stable in viscosity with temperature and slower to oxidise, meaning it will last a lot longer than T250. I would not use it in my 1930 Dodge 8.

 

Is there any brass in the gearbox? I am thinking of bushes inside the countershaft gear, for example? If so, the Copper Strip Corrosion Test (ASTM D130) result becomes important. The Meropa 1500 has a result of 1B. A result of 1A would be better if there is copper in the gearbox.

 

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Do you have an Instruction Book or Book of Information for the car? What does the cross section of the gear box show?

 

There have been a few 1924-5-6 gearbox questions here. Maybe have a look at them and see if there is any enlightenment. If nothing else, I would go for the Meropa. I think the problem with that gearbox is that there is no drive for the countershaft gear unless you engage a gear, so the oil needs to transfer angular momentum into the countershaft gear as/before you engage it.

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