Su8overdrive

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About Su8overdrive

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    Lifelong autoholic.

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  1. 9" x 12" color prestige catalog, "For 1938, The Packard Eight, The Packard Six." Describes bumper to bumper, wheels up engineering and all accessories, with specifications of both lines. Complete and in excellent condition, no water or other stains, no creases. But for a quarter inch wear on the NW corner of the cover, would list this as mint. $120 postpaid. Reply mike-exanimo@sbcglobal.net, or call Russ Craig, Pacific Coast Time (925) 939-6294.
  2. This is strange. What are we missing? Again, the laws of physics, automotive engineering aren't capricious.
  3. Here's something none of us can understand. We were talking about timing, noting that most immediate prewar US cars had tune up specs showing 2 to 7 degrees BTDC, other than the 260-ci ohv nine-mained Nash straight eight up to 15 degrees BTDC 1935-37, nine degrees 1938 or '39. But the point is, all in MoToR's Manual were and are Before Top Dead Center e x c e p t Chrysler products. Why would Chrysler products alone call for tuning specs of ATDC (after top dead center)? The laws of physics, those for four-stroke i.c. engines don't change. No other automaker lists anything other than BTDC. For example, according to the 1935-42 and 1935-53 MoToR's Manual, 1935-38 Plymouth 4 degrees ATDC, 1939-42 TDC; 1935-36 DeSoto Airflow Six 5 degrees ATDC, a couple less ATDC 1937-42. This ends the War II lower octane gas idea. So our question remains. In fact, all the more mysterious. Why just Chrysler of all automakers?
  4. Here's something none of us can understand. We were talking about timing, noting that most immediate prewar US cars had tune up specs showing 2 to 7 degrees BTDC, other than the 260-ci ohv nine-mained Nash straight eight up to 15 degrees BTDC 1935-37, nine degrees 1938 or '39. But the point is, all in MoToR's Manual were and are Before Top Dead Center e x c e p t Chrysler products. Why would Chrysler products alone call for tuning specs of ATDC (after top dead center)? The laws of physics, those for four-stroke i.c. engines don't change. No other automaker lists anything other than BTDC. For example, according to the 1935-42 and 1935-53 MoToR's Manual, 1935-38 Plymouth 4 degrees ATDC, 1939-42 TDC; 1935-36 DeSoto Airflow Six 5 degrees ATDC, a couple less ATDC 1937-42. This ends the War II lower octane gas idea. So our question remains. In fact, all the more mysterious. Why just Chrysler of all automakers?
  5. Autolite is better than Delco, has the edge. I've had three '40s Packards, including my present '47 senior Clipper, and any NAPA store can help. Additionally, there are Packard vendors all over the nation with all AutoLite components in stock. Cars are all about devil in the details. Always get the best, even if it seems a paltry matter. Autolite distributors are better than Delco distributors, according to aged, lifelong mechanics who were around in the day and since. Don't go slumming when you have a Packard, any Packard, junior or senior. They had the best chassis of the '40s, notwithstanding GM's slick styling, marketing, HydraMatic.
  6. Just tripped over this terrific thread, but some of you did not carefully read Rusty O'Toole's (or is it Barney Oldfield or Russell Crowe?) knowledgeable, reasoned posts, since you continued to compare much later ohv engines using vastly higher octane fuel, ignoring his facts. O'Toole's remark about Cadillacs avoided like the plague in many well off realms is true. Much of my boyhood in Myers Park section of Charlotte, NC, and the successful souls in our neighborhood, if they felt a need to put on the dog, did so with an Olds, tho' a local judge was happy with his '55 Roadmaster convertible, top never down. A friend's father was president of Harris-Teeter supermarket chain in the days before CEOs received 500-1,000 times as much as their employees, and he was happy with a well-tended late model Pontiac Catalina--- not even a Bonneville. My father drove Chryslers, and a '50s New Yorker was a better road car than a Cadillac-ack-ack-ack-ack-ack-ack (thank you, Billy Joel, Moving Out, which further sums the view of Cadillac to many folk), faster steering, better shocks and brakes, superior engine, if only other than their hemi head added to the '49 Cad engine design. The strong showing of the smaller displacement Chryslers against the Stutzes and Bentleys at LeMans O'Toole cites says much. Maurice Hendry, with an engineering background as well as being an automotive historian, writer, remarked that most dohc 420-ci Duesenberg Model Js in road trim were good for 105 mph, only 10 mph faster than a well-tuned 385-ci Chrysler Imperial. The Model J gave you, for the price of five arguably better looking Imperials, only twin cams and a cuckoo clock that flashed lights at intervals telling you to check oil, battery, and that the proprietary Bijur automatic chassis oiling system was working. As for the J's enameled and polished aluminum engine components, look at an original or faithfully restored top-line Massey Ferguson tractor of the era, when manufacturers often went all out to entice what money remained. The dohc Model J was obsolete shortly after being introduced, and it took 8 years and several iterations to dispatch but 480 of them, strictly to look at me types. Fred Duesenberg wanted to build something the size of his earlier Model A and X, but E. L. Cord insisted on an ultimate car, which is why the J advertised 265 hp since an extremely limited production Mercedes SSK advertised 250 hp, itself inflated a bit. For such ridiculous price, the J should've been impressive. Much more of interest to most of us are fine cars that fiscal mortals might own. Later, in high school in Westchester County, just up the lazy river from Manhattan, we rarely saw Cadillacs. Anyone in Dobbs Ferry or Hastings-on-the-Hudson bombing around in such would've been laughed at no end, and these were bedroom communities for Mad Men, Wall Streeters, tenured NYU and Columbia profs, theater and TV folk among others. Now Bronxville and Scarsdale, that might've been another story, but we never ventured there and even our cross country team never ran against them. Meanwhile, a refined L-head engine making smooth power through an overdrive was not a bad way to go in the day. Nor a couple times a year if you can find a break in the traffic in our overpopulated present. A years-belated thanks for this novel, refreshing thread.
  7. All parts cherry-picked mainly from California 1946-47 Customs Supers in the early 1970s, stored indoors since. Prompt, insured shipping. Been buying and selling Packard parts 43 years. Never an unhappy transaction. I might need you someday. Chrome bezel for instrument cluster and speedometer, excellent, includes ammeter and gas gauge but not temp & oil. Mint white lettering with brown background, all 1946-47. $145 Hood stainless side trim strips and barbs, 1942-47 seniors. Side strips are flawless, $75 each, part# 379040, left, #379041, right. Someone put a small screw through each barb, and the driver's side barb has two small holes where the brazed mounting bracket pulled loose, but some silver solder will save these, so $25 right, part# 379125, $20 left, # 379124, or $185 for the complete set. 1946-47 Custom Super interior windshield finish molding, gorgeous chrome, micro pits not worth replating. Part# 380314, $25 Interior rear ceiling dome light 1941-47, nice chrome has micro pitting not worth replating, few will notice or care. $25. Mint frosted glass. 1942 One-Eighty Clipper and 1946-47 Custom Super back of front seat cigar lighter bezel. Micro pits not worth replating. $20 1942-47 180 Clipper/Custom Super brushed aluminum with anodized gold inscribed PACKARD ashtray cover for back of front seat. Lovely. Missing handle but Y&Z and others may have this. $25. Front seat adjusting handle, escutcheon, lever & bracket assembly for all 1941-47 four doors, gorgeous chrome. $35 NOS Gates 665 fan belts for all 356 engines. Try to find these. $55. Can't upload crisp photos of the final three items below, but contact me and I'll email them to you directly. Horns, right (passenger side), 1941-47 Clippers, all. Have two, one for parts $20, the other excellent shape but missing only cover, $40. Disassembled 21st series senior speedometer/odometer, mint ivory/white lettering on brown background, perfect glass. $50 Front license plate bracket for 1941-47 Clippers. It's a gray area, legally, to drive a collector car without a front license plate in most states, tho' many of us do this. A local cop admitted he did this on his own old Corvette. Because I like the cleaner, lighter look of the prewar Clippers, i removed the heavy, bulky, clunky front license plate holder and front and rear bumper extensions from my '47 Super Clipper (a warmed over '42 One-Sixty Clipper as you know). But in case some busy body gendarme pulls you over for something else and notices your missing front license plate, now you can comply, at least long enough to have another patrolman sign off on it. $25 contact: mike-exanimo@sbcglobal.net horns right passenger side.htm speedo.htm
  8. Complete instrument clusters w/ all gauges, brown background with nice white lettering, ammeter, part #387673, gas gauge, part #387671, temperature with sending tube and bulb, #387674,oil pressure,#387672. For all 1946-47 junior and senior, $230, less than trying to find them piecemeal. Chrome bezel for instrument cluster and speedometer, excellent, includes ammeter and gas gauge but not temp & oil. Mint white lettering with brown background, all 1946-47. $145 Cover, center panel, this is the big chromed die casting for center of dash for 1941-47, part# 371539, $225. Lovely, has map light assembly with push/pull knob. Hood stainless side trim strips and barbs, 1942-47 seniors. Side strips are flawless, $75 each, part# 379040, left, #379041, right. Someone put a small screw through each barb, and the driver's side barb has two small holes where the brazed mounting bracket pulled loose, but some silver solder will save these, so $25 right, part# 379125, $20 left, # 379124, or $185 for the complete set. 1946-47 Custom Super interior windshield finish molding, gorgeous chrome, micro pits not worth replating. Part# 380314, $25 Interior rear ceiling dome light 1941-47, nice chrome has micro pitting not worth replating, few will notice or care. $25. Mint frosted glass. 1942 One-Eighty Clipper and 1946-47 Custom Super back of front seat cigar lighter bezel. Micro pits not worth replating. $20 1942-47 180 Clipper/Custom Super brushed aluminum with anodized gold inscribed PACKARD ashtray cover for back of front seat. Lovely. Missing handle but Y&Z and others may have this. $25. Front seat adjusting handle, escutcheon, lever & bracket assembly for all 1941-47 four doors, gorgeous chrome. $35 Mint top left cat whisker for 1942-47 junior Clipper, part #378860. Try and find one. $55 Complete left junior tail light for 1946-47 without turn signal. Chrome shiny for driver, replate for show. The mint glass lens alone is worth the $45 I'm asking for the entire assembly. NOS Gates 665 fan belts for all 356 engines. Try to find these. $55. Horns, right (passenger side), 1941-47 Clippers, all. Have two, one for parts $20, the other excellent shape but missing only cover, $40. Disassembled 21st series senior speedometer/odometer, mint ivory/white lettering on brown background, perfect glass. $50 Front license plate bracket for 1941-47 Clippers. It's a gray area, legally, to drive a collector car without a front license plate in most states, tho' many of us do this, a local cop admitted he did this on his own old Corvette. Because I like the cleaner, lighter look of the prewar Clippers, i removed the heavy, bulky, clunky front license plate holder and front and rear bumper extensions from my '47 Super Clipper (a warmed over '42 One-Sixty Clipper as you know). But in case some busy body gendarme pulls you over for something else and notices your missing front license plate, now you can comply, at least long enough to have another patrolman sign off on it. $25 All my parts were cherry-picked mainly from California 1946-47 Customs Supers in the early 1970s, stored indoors since. Prompt, insured shipping. Been buying and selling Packard parts 43 years. Never an unhappy transaction. I might need you someday. Contact: mike-exanimo@sbcglobal.net
  9. Lovely chrome. Contains complete map light push/pull knob assembly. Packard part #371539. $230. Prompt insured shipping. If sharp photo won't open, just contact me and I'll email it to you: mike-exanimo@sbcglobal.net
  10. Complete left (driver's side) tail light assembly for any junior Clipper except 1946-47 Deluxe 8 (which has turn signals); includes housing for bulb, chrome bezel shiny, minor pitting. Ok for driver, or replate with no loss of detail. Mint glass lens alone worth the $50 I'm asking for the complete assembly.
  11. Complete instrument clusters for all 21st series Packards. Brown background with sharp, crisp white lettering in all four gauges; ammeter, Packard part # 387673 , gasoline gauge, #387671, oil pressure, #387672, temperature, #387674. Temp gauges have sending unit line with bulb. All parts cherry-picked from California Packards in early '70s, garaged since then. $240 for complete cluster a far better price than trying to find all four gauges separately. Prompt, insured shipping. Been buying and selling Packard parts 43 years. Never an unhappy transaction. I might need you someday. Contact: mike-exanimo@sbcglobal.net
  12. Complete instrument clusters with ammeter, gas, temperature and oil pressure for all 21st series Packards, junior and senior. Temp gauges have sending unit with bulb. $250 complete, less than trying to find all four gauges separately. Brown background with nice white lettering on all four gauges. All my parts are from California cars cherry-picked in the early '70s, stored indoors since.
  13. Might we tender an amazingly simple solution? The CCCA should have a cordial, polite form e-response to those wanting a post-1948 car considered referring them to the Milestone Car Society, the Antique Automobile Club of America, the Rolls-Royce Owners Club, the Bentley Drivers Club, the Contemporary Historical Vehicle Society, the Buick Club of America, the Packard Club, the Nash Club, the Cadillac-LaSalle Club, the Walter P. Chrysler Club, the Mercedes Club, the Sports Car Club of America, www.nationalwoodieclub.com, www.ferrariclubofamerica.org, www.barret-jackson.com, www.classicmotorcarauctions.com, www.kruseclassics.com (because it's really all about money and that now vaunted word, classic ) and the myriad existing clubs awaiting their cars with open arms. This most polite form letter can conclude with a long list of various car clubs' websites. However, as the CCCA already does, we remind these people in our most cordial form e- or slow mail reply that they are still welcome to join us even if they don't own a CCCA car if they've an interest in CCCA cars. That's the end of it. It really is. Now can we get back to discussing CCCA cars? Haven't seen a Jensen Model H saloon in a looooong time. And wasn't it astounding the quality you got in an Auburn Twelve, especially for the money?
  14. Amen, gentlemen. Truer words regarding the Classic Car Club of America's current dilution and resulting fade do not exist. Studepeople's comments, above, say it all.
  15. Packard, Hudson, Chrysler, Ford, Nash, Studebaker, everyone but GM in those years was positive ground. Far as i've seen, Cadillac was the exception at GM, being the only division in those years to be positive ground. Wonder what the thinking at GM's other negative-ground divisions was. Anyone have a sound engineering reason? Have often wondered.